Please recommend a definitive record from the classic jazz drummers?

David M Scott

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Actually, the drummer on the "Straight Ahead" album was Harold Jones, not Rufus, and it was 1968. Rufus was only with Basie for a short time and I don't believe he ever made an album with the band.
Dang.. your right it was Harold.. well Kudos to Harold .. he’s on my list !
 

Morello Man

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No one has mentioned Rufus Speedy Jones and the 1966 Basie album “Straight Ahead” which incidentally was arranged by Sammy Nestico. I’m 80 and have been a Jazz lover since a teenager
and I think it’s the greatest Big Band Jazz album ever recorded.
Rufus is all over the numbers and his work on Magic Flea at 300 bpm + is mind blowing. While I grew up with Krupa and Rich I’d vote for Rufus. And who couldn’t be impressed by Joe Morello King of the “odd time signature” His work on that single ride cymbal was amazing... like his wrists were on rubber balls !
just sayin...
Joe Morello - Dave Brubeck Quartet Live In Zurich 1964
 

DrummerJustLikeDad

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Drumline in the Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging
Joe Morello - Dave Brubeck Quartet Live In Zurich 1964
Obscure choice, but one worth checking out!

 

Elvis

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Speaking of Joe Morello, check out The Marian McPartland Trio Live at the Hickory House.
Morello shows off some exquisite brush technique on that album.

 

David M Scott

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Speaking of Joe Morello, check out The Marian McPartland Trio Live at the Hickory House.
Morello shows off some exquisite brush technique on that album.

Great stuff. When I first took some drum lessons in the mid 50s
the instructor was an Brit and he said we had to learn to master the brushes first. it’s amazing today how w many drummers don’t play brushes or if the do they use the matched grip and basically beat them like sticks.. no sweeping left hand as provided by the traditional opposed grip. I attended a Jazz night put on by our local University who’ve had a music degree program for 100 plus years and 50 years for Jazz. The drummer used brushes like a weapon. I was surprised as the Jazz program director was a Jazz studio musician before teaching.
it’s interesting to note that Jeff Hamilton has a YouTube video on brushes. I really like Jeff as he’s like a blast from the past in his overall style.His work with Diana Krall is great. I play brushes more than sticks for Jazz and use it for all music genre’. I’m a great fan of Bossa and one of the vocalists and guitarists I work with do a bang up job. I often use brushes rather than sticks as they provide a subtleness especially with a singer. I just use my left hand like I would with a stick on the rim. Joe is one of my all time favorites
bar non.
 

Elvis

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Yeah, that whole album is a treasure. Didn't even knew it existed until about 20 years ago and I was floored to find out that was Joe Morello playing behind her. Never knew he could swizzle the brushes like that.
Rick Considine's two-part brush technique videos some of the best stuff I've seen on the subject. I implore anyone interested in brushes, to give it a viewing.
You'll very likely learn something.
...you also brought up Diana Krall...
Jeff Hamilton gets a lot of accolades for his performances backing her, and deservedly so, but when it comes to Diana Krall, I prefer Billy Drummond as her drummer.
The guy is talented beyond belief.

Elvis
 

David M Scott

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Yeah, that whole album is a treasure. Didn't even knew it existed until about 20 years ago and I was floored to find out that was Joe Morello playing behind her. Never knew he could swizzle the brushes like that.
Rick Considine's two-part brush technique videos some of the best stuff I've seen on the subject. I implore anyone interested in brushes, to give it a viewing.
You'll very likely learn something.
...you also brought up Diana Krall...
Jeff Hamilton gets a lot of accolades for his performances backing her, and deservedly so, but when it comes to Diana Krall, I prefer Billy Drummond as her drummer.
The guy is talented beyond belief.

Elvis
I’ll take a look at Billy.
if you’ve never seen crazy brush work look on YouTube Benny Goodman 1937. the number is a real uptempo called “I’ve got a Heartfull of Music” Krupa is full bore. Note the wasn’t a Bass. Electric Bass guitars hadn’t been invented of if so in their infancy. Stand up Bass players were hard to find as most were in symphony orchestras and used bows to play.
 

Elvis

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Those old guys back in the stand-up days were masters, to be certain.
Tiny Brown, who played with Slim Gaillard in the 40's surprised me a couple of times and Benny Spieler's work with the Miles Davis / Tadd Dameron Group in Paris in 1949 is superb as well.
I read somewhere that Spieler actually considered himself a classical musician first and played Jazz as a "Fun sideline"....although his list of credits might suggest otherwise.


Elvis
 

hawker

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Notes And Tones is a great book. I recommend to everyone to read it. I also love the story about how Art B had to get Art T's drums back from a loan shark. I think Wynton Marsallis told that story on Ken Burn's Jazz.
As I've mentioned elsewhere...big A.T. fan here. But I'm guessing these kinds of stories (I've heard others) may indicate A: Art wasn't good with money or B: Art had some bad habits? I've always wondered because on some videos he looks unwell and at times rushes badly? However in his latest or maybe his last video, he looks looks great. Gone too soon, he had a lot of playing left in him.
 
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In regard to Hawkers post.

I'm going to say this as gently as I can, because I hate talking about it. I don't know about AT's personal habits early in his life. Lots of the musicians from uptown (Sugar Hill) in NYC developed bad habits, heroin was as accessible as a gallon of milk. Why you could get it on every corner there, and not elsewhere is a different (yet more important) discussion. However, during the (much later) years that I knew him, AT was straight as an arrow. Sure he drank, but that was it! (I don't know anything about gambling and loan sharks though.)

BUT...

As wonderful as a drummer (and bandleader) as Blakey was, his word, and his memories are NOT to be trusted. He played fast and loose with the truth (and the money,) never letting the truth get in the way of a good story, and was a lifelong addict, and everyone knew it. I have also been told by musicians who were recorded "Jazz Messengers," that Blakey (to put it lightly) "wasn't the nicest guy in the world," nor "the most responsible either." One musician told me, "Blakey made Miles look like The Pope." Love his drumming, but (in my opinion) you might want to find other "role model."

This is a touchy subject because Blakey gave a lot of guys their first "big break" by hiring them for the Messengers. He also provided a lot of work to a lot of musicians. So no one wants to publicly disparage him.

On a related note, it is also true that for a while whenever you hired Philly Joe for a record date, you wanted to have another drummer "on standby" in case Philly Joe didn't show. And that "standby" drummer was VERY OFTEN Art Taylor. So that might show how responsible A.T. was for much of his life as well.

Therefore, I will believe what I saw with my own eyes with A.T. And heavily discount Blakey's words. Simply put, if you were going to let either one hold your wallet while you went on stage, for me it would have been Art Taylor EVERY time and twice on Sunday!!!!!

Sorry if I disparaged anyone's hero,
MSG
 
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JimmySticks

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Stan Levey, This Time the Drum's On Me; Loving it!
I mentioned Stan earlier on in this thread because he always seems to get forgotten in the conversation of the greats, and he was one of the greats. Glad he has at least one other fan! :icon_lol:

His book was a great read as well. What an interesting guy he was.
 

Johnny K

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On a related note, it is also true that for a while whenever you hired Philly Joe for a record date, you wanted to have another drummer "on standby" in case Philly Joe didn't show. And that "standby" drummer was VERY OFTEN Art Taylor. So that might show how responsible A.T. was for much of his life as well.

Therefore, I will believe what I saw with my own eyes with A.T. And heavily discount Blakey's words. Simply put, if you were going to let either one hold your wallet while you went on stage, for me it would have been Art Taylor EVERY time and twice on Sunday!!!!!

Sorry if I disparaged anyone's hero,
MSG
I've heard those stories about Philly Jo.

You didnt. Im old enough to know that you should never meet your heroes. The content is what counts. Could care less about anyone's personal life. Lord know's I am no angel, but I am very good at my profession.
 

Elvis

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Drums: Buddy Rich
Trumpet: Thad Jones
Trumpet: Joe Newman
Tenor Saxophone: Ben Webster
Tenor Saxophone: Frank Wess
Piano: Oscar Peterson
Guitar: Freddie Green
Bass Guitar: Ray Brown

1955 Verve Label Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.
 

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