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Plexiglas/ acrylic “cymbal shield” discs ??

BBeyer

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I’ve seen these things popping up on stage here and there, and actually performed on a kit at a showcase that had them set up.
The guys in my Cars tribute band have expressed concerns over my cymbal volume, and the bleed Into the vocal mics.
I refuse to play being a plexiglas wall.. so I suggested these clear discs. Nobody really knows much about them but the little research I did came up with some positive feedback, so the band ordered 4 of them.
We’re trying them out in the rehearsal room (just two of them) and just for now we have messed around with a few tunes but spent most of the time just setting up gear.. next week we will have our bassist and will probably be able to see if these things help at all.

Does anyone on the forum use them? Pros/cons?
I like how they almost disappear on stage. I saw the band “Failure” perform at a small club recently and didn’t even notice they were there at first
 

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bassanddrum84

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Maybe it’s just me but I refuse to use any deflection as a drummer. They didn’t tel bonham, moon, Dave grohl, etc what happen to bands just being bands. It’s music it’s loud
 

BBeyer

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Maybe it’s just me but I refuse to use any deflection as a drummer. They didn’t tel bonham, moon, Dave grohl, etc what happen to bands just being bands. It’s music it’s loud
I agree with you, I don’t know what happened with bands just playing on stage and dealing with it… But I saw these clear discs as a nice compromise that I could actually deal with, when people ask me to not be as loud. I think part of my problem is we are all on in ears and I don’t have enough of my kit miked to know how hard I’m actually hitting my cymbals. My biggest annoyance with using I EM’s is that I could never hear myself well enough
 
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Buffalo_drummer

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I play a club that has a backline kit that has these. Its a PITA because they are clamped to the cymbal stands making adjusting them to your liking challenging. According to my bandmates they say it does cut down on the volume going to them on stage. I certainly wouldn't use them regularly on all gigs.

I know some touring bands use them and if I had a tech that wanted to set them up every show, I'm all for it.
 

Tornado

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Most people say these don't do much. But if you only need a little help, maybe they're right for you.

I agree with you, I don’t know what happened the bands just playing on stage and dealing with it… But I saw these clear discs as a nice compromise that I could actually deal with, when people ask me to not be as loud. I think part of my problem is we are all on any years and I don’t have enough of my kit miked to know how hard I’m actually hitting my symbols. My biggest annoyance with using I EM’s is that I could never hear myself well enough


You should be able to get a pretty good in ear picture with a kick mic and an overhead. Make sure your mics are loud enough in your mix or turn down other stuff. I tend to play to the volume my ears tell me is correct, so making myself louder is a good way to keep my playing softer.

If you've got the capability, pan things left and right so that you can hear yourself over the other things in your mix. I've found that everything coming through both ears makes everything hard to hear.
 

bassanddrum84

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I agree with you, I don’t know what happened the bands just playing on stage and dealing with it… But I saw these clear discs as a nice compromise that I could actually deal with, when people ask me to not be as loud. I think part of my problem is we are all on any years and I don’t have enough of my kit miked to know how hard I’m actually hitting my symbols. My biggest annoyance with using I EM’s is that I could never hear myself well enough
If I run in small bars I use a kick mic and a large diaphragm over head. I find the over head amazing for in ears specially because I can hear my cymbals super clear. Outside I mic everything including an over head.
 

CC Cirillo

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Those discs certainly appear to be another”possible “ sonic solution, and sorry I have no personal experience.

I’ve never used any plexi but would not blink if it got the job done.

I’m going to sway this in another direction and mean no disrespect. I have always viewed it as my job to make the volume work properly be in on stage or in the studio. This has not been easy for me, but I think it’s one of those things I feel is my responsibility to get a handle on. I’ve struggled, but made inroads. Playing small stages or places with funky acoustics or trying to self-regulate in a studio—I felt I had no choice. I’m not on arena stages where my bandmates are 30 feet away.

I’ve made inroads and have gotten nothing but positive feedback from my bandmates. On stage one can look like one is a heavy hitter without actually hitting heavy.

It might mean I don’t hit as hard or I use thinner cymbals.

This may not work for you or apply to you and your musical situations. Just my personal journey. Many rivers still to cross.

There is a story told of John Bonham—no idea if it is true—that he is recording and the engineer comes out and is moving a mic away from a cymbal and Bonham asks him why. The engineer says the cymbal is too loud in the mix. Bonham responds that he just won’t hit it as hard.
 

Erik

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It also seems like these would have to be handled very carefully. Acrylic seems to scratch easily
 

bpaluzzi

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If you’re on a very small stage, these can help keep cymbals out of the vocal mics. On bigger stages, the cymbal sound isn’t really directional by the time the sound reaches the vocal mics. Even on medium sized stages, there’s as much sound bouncing off the ceiling as there as directly coming off the cymbals. But if you’re in a place where the vocalist is RIGHT in front of the drums, they can help.
 

BBeyer

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It also seems like these would have to be handled very carefully. Acrylic seems to scratch easily
Yeah. I found that they fit in a cymbal bag, and i can separate them with pieces of cardboard to avoid scratches. We will see
 

goodcat1337

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I've only really seen them used in churches, I think they're called baffles. But yeah, they're used for keeping cymbals out of the mics.
 

drumflyer

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I asked about these a few weeks ago on this forum. I have 2 and will be using them for the first time this weekend. I’ll let you know what the sound guy says after Sunday.
Went to see Randall King last weekend and his drummer had them set up. Not a small stage. Supposed to cut the high frequency sound and the lingering ring from the cymbals from going through the vocal mics on stage.
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tnsquint1

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We use them occasionally in our rental stock. They certainly help in situations where you are on tighter stages, or with artists that have lots of downstage vocal mics or artists that don’t sing particularly loud.
 

equipmentdork

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I used them recently at a New York City club, and, while it looked like a salad bar, the singers said it was much easier on the ears. But these were the club's(City Winery Loft) and I would not consider buying them.



Dan
 

tnsquint1

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Ugh I’d just play quieter.
And that is certainly appropriate in some scenarios, however, in a pro level pop, rock, Latin, gospel, country or similar situations, it’s important that the performance be as energetic as expected. Sure, a talented musician can generate energy at any level, but we are not talking about that. The acrylic discs are a nice solution when necessary.
 

drumflyer

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They worked! No bleed thru of the highs and sustained ring to the vocal mics from the cymbals.
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glynch

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I play mostly medium sized venues and I don't run overheads. I actually rely on the vocal mic bleed through to make sure my cymbals are coming through out front. Luckily no one in the bands I've played in over the last 30 years seemed to mind. Even if they did I mean they are just vocalists so who cares right? :D
 


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