Poll: Are you a Buddy Rich fan? Yes or No

Are you a fan of Buddy Rich?


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JDA

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There's also something in that Bus tape that I've heard no one mention- not sure but it sounds like "I'm busting my...trying to do someone a favor" and " you've had a few nights off"..

Makes it sound that gig that erupted in between sets on the bus... was a private gig..off the schedule... possible the guys in the band thought they could lay back..
There's some context to that blow up that's missing.

Listen to how Buddy words that...

I'm not positive that was a public performance...could have been Bud doing a Favor private party concert (for someone)...a not on-schedule- gig... may go a way to explaining the band guys laying back etc
 
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Matched Gripper

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How can you claim to be a drummer and not be a Buddy Rich fan? Was there ever a drummer with a greater command of the instrument?
I'm glad you asked!

I have had the privilege of seeing Buddy play live on 2 occasions. I've also had the privilege of seeing some other "pretty good" drummers of different genres play live, such as:

Tony Williams
Peter Erskine
Vinnie Colaiuta
Billy Cobham
Steve Gadd
Terry Bossio
Ari Hoenig
Jack Dejohnette
Nomar Negroni
Ed Thigpen
Guy Viveros
Duffy Jackson
John Bonham
Todd Sucherman
Virgil Donati

I'm probably forgetting a few. Granted some of these I saw in clinics and master classes. But, I will just say that, in my opinion, none of them were more the master of their instruments within their respective genres than Buddy was of his instrument and his genre, if as much. Experiencing Buddy Rich live was witnessing a force of nature. I've said this before, I think of Buddy Rich as the ultimate drumset virtuoso, on the level of virtuosos like Vladamir Horowitz, Yitzak Perlman, Charlie Parker, Harry James, Ray Brown, etc. Again, JMO! And he was self taught, didn't read rhythm or know music theory according to Don Menza.
 
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JDA

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JDA

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In a traditional sense you have a point; he didn't do "loose" too well.. imo..
he didn't do "implied" wasn't big on "shading" just my opinion which doesn't add up to beans..
may have lacked " color"....etc

(So as a drummer we each reserve the right to analyse fully (as a personal opinion...) nobody walks on water) etc
Nobody walks on water I think we can all agree on that one.

Scott : ) :!!
let me amend that. He may have done "implied" (leading to cross-rhythm) but it was brutal LOL !
unsubtle..guess that's "Big Band" altho Mel Lewis and others could have another opinion..
 

JDA

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Richie Cole
he recently moved to the town next to me ( I could literally walk there) Have not seen him have not seen him sit in hang with any local (big ones not me) But I'd like to run into him..He moved back to be close with his daughter which is like Irwin Pa. (??!.. but haven't heard of him playing.
 

JimmySticks

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Great players? Good but not great.

Likely they needed a job. And were sorry they took that one.
Read post #149, dcrigger.

He lists a slew of players that went onto great careers after there start with Buddy Rich. So I don’t think they were ever sorry for taking a job with him.
 

jansara

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Acknowledged. However, at the time, they still likely needed the job.
Starting out, everybody needed a job. Wynton Marsalis played clubs, dances, proms, top 40 covers. So did Elvin Jones. Buddy's band was a hell of a move up from the Bar Mitzvah scene for guys coming out of the Berklees and Juilliards. They jumped at the chance.
 

BennyK

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Starting out, everybody needed a job. Wynton Marsalis played clubs, dances, proms, top 40 covers. So did Elvin Jones. Buddy's band was a hell of a move up from the Bar Mitzvah scene for guys coming out of the Berklees and Juilliards. They jumped at the chance.

Well said . The grocery store never refused my money because I earned it playing bad country and western .
 

dcrigger

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Acknowledged. However, at the time, they still likely needed the job.
I get that some (and it would seem likely you) don't see or agree with the amount of attention the drum community and the world at large heaps on the legacy of Buddy Rich. And I can see how that might seem like some wrong that needs righting. That undue attention to Buddy is attention better given to others.

I get it. I personally feel that Don Ellis' albums, particularly "Don Ellis at Filmore" was more significant than the music of Miles from that same period, namely "Bitches Brew" (which the censor probably mangled) in the formation of fusion. I can even make some really sound arguments for this. And I might actually be right.

But all of my arguments don't require dismissing "how the field of music actually works" in order to make them.

Your argument above attempts exactly that.

Whether you believe it's historical attention was justified or not, the attention paid to the Rich band during those years and how being associated with benefitted it's players needs no justification... it is just well documented historical fact. This was indeed... a coveted gig.

This was not a gig anyone landed because "they were looking for a gig". This was a gig, you were invited - with the right recommendations - to "try out" for. Then if you cut the mustard, you were invited to stay - for as long as you continued to cut the mustard.

Not liking it or not caring for it stylistically is really no excuse for any musician to fail to acknowledge the expertise required... from every chair. Buddy's band was typically Tower of Power tight with a book of charts numbering 100's - with dozens of charts in rotation at any given time.

To put any gig at this level in terms of the players there "needing the job" is pretty much absurd.

Was it the end goal of all of it's players - of course not. As the exhaustive list I posted above showed. No - it was a showcase gig. A gig most players would do for free if they were able to land it. Just because of the legitimacy it stamped on their resume.
 

DrummerJustLikeDad

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The muppets is a prime example of who he was. He couldn't even let a puppet on a comedy show win.
I remember as a 9-year-old being disappointed that Rita Moreno didn’t show much respect for Animal either.

I’m sure these were writers’ room decisions, of course, playing for where the comedy would best play to a guest star’s perceived persona. John Cleese’s appearance basically featured him in his irascible Basil Fawlty character.

 


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