Practice Jazz.

Michielkuis

New Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2019
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Hi Guys,

I'm drumming for years now. I know most basic rock beats and technics and that. I'm looking for a way to expand my drum playing and get better. Is practicing Jazz good for your overall playing? Will it add to my arsenal? And it is beneficial for my playing?
Hope you guys can help me further.

Thanks!

Michael
 

Seb77

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 11, 2013
Messages
2,313
Reaction score
923
Location
Germany
I would actually focus on snare drum. Rudimental Solos such as Wilcoxon's "All American Drummer". Technical exercises, too, but these aren't as muscially satisfying as getting a complete piece under your belt. If you're not taking lessons already, do that. I'm saying this because in order to play jazz, you need proper technique. You don't get technque by attemtpting to play jazz by yourself. Other than technique, jazz is a great genre to dive deeper into the more intricate aspects of drumset playing. Dynamics, touch, improvising etc.
 
Last edited:

jansara

Very well Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2005
Messages
546
Reaction score
337
You don't need any special technique to play Jazz. You only need to like Jazz.

If you have a firm grasp of singles, doubles and triplets, what you create with them depends on how much Jazz you have listened to, your feel, and your own creative skill.
 

rstange1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2013
Messages
154
Reaction score
93
Location
Victoria, BC
Michielkuis, put me in the "you need proper technique" camp with Seb77 along with his comments about studying (not just practising) jazz. Want to swing a bit, sure you can figure that out yourself. Want to play serious jazz, that is serious work. Check out the playing in the video linked below. WJIII knows his rudiments, music theory, jazz history, etc., and has impeccable technique.

 
Last edited:

multijd

DFO Veteran
Joined
Dec 1, 2013
Messages
1,533
Reaction score
814
Location
Buffalo, NY
You don't need any special technique to play Jazz. You only need to like Jazz.

If you have a firm grasp of singles, doubles and triplets, what you create with them depends on how much Jazz you have listened to, your feel, and your own creative skill.
Maybe. But f you took some”jazz“ lessons with Kenny Washington, for example, or many of the other fine jazz teachers they would certainly work on rudiments and Wilcoxon.
 

GeeDeeEmm

Very well Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2018
Messages
1,455
Reaction score
1,117
Location
Arkansas
You don't need any special technique to play Jazz. You only need to like Jazz.
I get what you are saying, and there is a lot of truth in your statement. If you really love the music, you will develop a natural feel for it and devote yourself to learn it.

And that's my problem: I don't love jazz. I truly admire jazz players for their styles and techniques, and listening to a good jazz drummer makes me appreciate the music, even though I don't especially like it.

Back in the nineties, I started taking jazz lessons with a very good drummer in our area who had that special "feel," and could apply that same feel to rock ,country, blues - anything and everything he played. (The only formalized instruction that I've ever had.) I stayed with him for a couple of months and he really opened up my country/rock/pop playing by finally showing me how to use my left hand, and how to use rudiments - neither of which I'm good at, still yet. I was playing three nights a week in a club gig at that time, and I did my best to incorporate his excellent instruction to what I was doing. All of that to say that I think that instruction is vital - but to succeed in applying that instruction, it is essential that you love what you are playing.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Jayson

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2019
Messages
20
Reaction score
3
Triplet related stuff can be applied to other styles - besides jazz.
 

NYFrank

Very well Known Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2008
Messages
1,080
Reaction score
97
Location
Northeast U.S.
Legit jazz play requires significant study and different technique building.

If you have never played with a light touch before, you might be surprised at how uncomfortable it is in the beginning. You need to log time to get that comfortable.

There is also bass drum feathering, lots of snare ghosting, and lots of different independence between limbs that you will need to work out - all while keeping the cymbal work moving along.

And, yes, lots and lots of listening.
 

dingaling

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2018
Messages
146
Reaction score
115
Location
NYC
I totally disagree. You don’t need to like jazz to start learning jazz. I’d go so far as to say most people don’t. Reason being is like a game, video or other game. Unless you are familiar with it, it’s not instantaneous fun. It’s more confusing. But start with one record over 6 month. Listen to it once a day. On your commute to work or school. Then once you become familiar with the sound, get another record and do it with that.
Over time your ear and brain will become accustomed to the sounds and you will gain a little interest. Then you’ll naturally start asking questions like how and why did the drummer do that. Then you’re hooked. And that’s that.
Don’t buy jazz drum books. And don’t do anything until you’ve had 6-9 months of listening like above.
I used to teach drumming. This is one of the only ways to get familiar with jazz which is not a “popular”‘or radio music. And it works.
Also stick to one record for 6 months. It’s hard but do it. Miles Davis “milestones” seems like the best choice to me but it can be anything.
Also pick up the Miles Davis auto bio. It’s an amazing read of you like music or not.
 

hardbat

Very well Known Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
1,156
Reaction score
481
Location
Sacramento CA, USA
Everyone is different. I was raised on rock, but fell in love with jazz the very first time I heard it.
 

Seb77

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 11, 2013
Messages
2,313
Reaction score
923
Location
Germany
You don’t need to like jazz to start learning jazz.
Why would you do it then? If you like it, fine, I’m a jazz lover myself, but if you don’t? I like the idea of listening to one record a lot, but it should be one you like.
 

dingaling

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2018
Messages
146
Reaction score
115
Location
NYC
Why would you do it then? If you like it, fine, I’m a jazz lover myself, but if you don’t? I like the idea of listening to one record a lot, but it should be one you like.
Good question. Music is a language.
So best example is this. Let’s say you speak only English, and you heard someone speaking French. It wouldn’t be any fun to listen to French if you didn’t understand it.
It would sound like noise and weird sounds. Not a coherent language to discuss politics, art and life in.
Sure, you could say I don’t want to learn French, doesn’t sound good to me. And fine. But if your mind was curious, you might think, what do those sounds meanWhat is that person trying to say?
So you take some online French lessons, then buy a book, then maybe private lessons, then watch tv shows in French and transcribe French kids books to start into English.
A couple years go by and you now speak entry level fluent French. Which opens up a world of people, discussions, and thoughts you might of never encountered if you didn’t learn French.
Now you are bi lingual. You’ve went on some trips to France and being in a different environment and speaking with people who grew up with a different culture and language make you think about life differently.

All that said, do what you want to do. Life is short and limited. If leaning a new language doesn’t appeal to you, then don’t do it.
But if your idol is let’s say Vinnie Colaiuta or Dave Weckle, and they spoke French, there might be something to it and I’d say it’s a good idea maybe to spend some time learning French...
 

ggmerino

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
91
Reaction score
34
Location
United States
Hi Guys,

I'm drumming for years now. I know most basic rock beats and technics and that. I'm looking for a way to expand my drum playing and get better. Is practicing Jazz good for your overall playing? Will it add to my arsenal? And it is beneficial for my playing?
Hope you guys can help me further.

Thanks!

Michael
Yes- I think playing jazz will make a big difference in your rock playing and playing in general- particular left hand independence. It did for me. And you never know, you might start loving jazz and jazz drumming. I did. Also, latin, afro-latin, latin/jazz and New Orleans rhythms can have a huge impact on your rock playing.
 

MntnMan62

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2011
Messages
437
Reaction score
421
Location
North New Jersey
Practicing and playing jazz can definitely expand and enhance your overall technique and playing. It can give you a facility and fluidity that you may not have already having just played rock. If you listen to John Bonham, you can hear the jazz influence in his playing. I mean, listen to his ghost notes and how slick he was. He wasn't all about mean chops and hard hitting. There was subtlety to his playing and I believe that was his jazz based influence. Another rock drummer influence by jazz was Aynsley Dunbar. I am a huge fan of his playing with Zappa. If he didn't have the jazz influence he likely would not have been in The Mothers. I also agree that practicing on just the snare and working on snare drum technique can be very helpful. When I was in college I took classical snare drum as an elective (my major was pre-law) and I found it really helped my overall playing and chops. Frankly, playing anything that falls outside of your comfort zone can have a positive impact on your technique and style. Go for it.
 

Latest posts



Top