Practicing Jazz with a terrible drumset

wflkurt

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I like the comment about the angle of the stick. I was watching a video of Art Blakey and it looked like he was holding the stick almost vertically while playing the snare.
As much as I would love to be a better traditional grip player, I just can't do nearly the things I can with matched. I have very little problem playing things quiet using matched so as much as I love and respect Steve Smith, I don't agree that playing traditional allows you to play quieter. I really just think traditional looks cool and I love the history of it. Usually after a few minutes of fooling with it, I usually switch back as I sound so much better playing matched. I will say that I think I can swish the circles using brushes better when I play traditional. That feels more comfortable. It always feels like my ring finger gets in the way of the bounce when I try playing triplets with traditional grip.
 

Tornado

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Steve Smith is correct that traditional grip puts your hand underneath the stick supporting the weight of the stick. This can help for sure. But rotate your matched grip into French. Oh, look, same thing! The angle isn't the same, but then there's the traditional playes who angle the snare making the angle of the stick much less of a factor. And it's fine. People just learn how to make the sounds they need to make with whatever techniques they use.
 

Deafmoon

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I fail to see how the quality of the drums makes a difference if you don’t have independence?
 

Elvis

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I like the comment about the angle of the stick. I was watching a video of Art Blakey and it looked like he was holding the stick almost vertically while playing the snare.
I tend to do that too (holding the stick almost vertically).
For me, its a very natural position when playing traditional grip...and yes, it does seem to affect the sound of the snare drum.

Elvis
 

Scott K Fish

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I'm not sure what style, actually, I'm very new to the genre; still researching.

My drum sizes are:
  • 22"x16" Bass Drum, 10"x8" & 12"x9" Toms & 16"x16" Floor Toms and 6.5"x14" Snare Drum
The head for the snare is a year old while the tom heads are six months old (I replaced them).

The sticks I use are discards from my drum teacher. They're Vic Firth "Rock Maple American Custom SD4 Combo".
I still have a 9x13 Ludwig tom with its original 1972 heads.
 

nanashi

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The trick to soft playing is not grip, drumheads, drum size, sticks, etc. It has to do with control. I would suggest practicing with just the snare drum so you can focus on the feel, going through the rudiments and also reading snare drum solos and etudes, paying attention to dynamics, because you should be able move through the different dynamics as needed. It will also help your articulation. Same with bass drum. Practice playing soft and also moving through the different dynamics. again, It's about control, not speed. Reading simple SD rhythms on the bass drum is an excellent way to develop control.
Find a spring tension that works for you. Also, don't concern your self with labels ( jazz drummer etc.). learn to play the instrument, which includes all styles.

As a side note, every one talks about the bop kit as if it became popular so that players could play softer. Back in the day a lot of those players lived in NYC at some point. They transported their gear to the gig via taxi and subway and when they got home they probably lived in 1,2,3 story walk ups. Musical concerns were an after thought.
 


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