Pro-Mark Sticks

lrod1707

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I've wanted to try the Ahead's many times but I can't swallow spending $30 on a pair of sticks. I know they last longer but I'm afraid I won't like them and they end up in the stick box with $30 down the drain. Maybe one day I'll reconsider! Now for the OP they seem like a good idea because of the fact that they should last longer. I personally don't break sticks but it seems to be an issue for him (and many others i'm sure). I usually don't let the stick get to a breaking point. When I start feeling that hollow feeling when I strike it, they go in the trash and they get replaced.
 

dale w miller

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c'mon, that's just a silly statement. It really depends on the type of music you're playing etc etc....I've had a pair of wood sticks last me 3 arena shows playing very incorrectly and with bad technique and I've had a wood stick break when I'm playing softly on a snare drum to warm up...it's different for everyone, and so is wood....but one thing has always been consistent, my horrible technique...hopefully I can keep working on that though...just my 2 cents!

cheers and blessing Trey
What does an arena show have anything to do with it?
 

lrod1707

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This might come as a news flash to some folks, but metal is harder than wood. If you hit rim shots, all the time and you hit the edges of cymbals, you will eventually break a stick. It might take you a few years even, but all wooden sticks will break eventually. I don't care what technique you use.
Yes, as you state "eventually". Problem is that the OP states that he's breaking them in 2 hours. I think he faces a different dilemma than most others do.
 

EvEnStEvEn

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I think ProMarks indeed have above average longevity, but has anyone noticed their American Hickory 7a Millennium II model is shorter than other brands' 7a model?
 

lrod1707

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but has anyone noticed their American Hickory 7a Millennium II model is shorter than other brands' 7a model?
I think that happens with other brands too. We were just discussing that on another thread yesterday. I think it's gotten to the point that their are so many size/style offerings that the manufactures are just using the size numbering system as an average and no longer as a specific. And I don't know if you've noticed this about Pro Mark: They are the only ones that don't disclose the diameter under the specifications of the sticks. They also don't specify a length, instead they list a size range. If you look at the regular hickory 5A on their website, it shows no diameter listed and the length is shown 15" to 16". It's kind of like if they do it on purpose as to invalidate whatever size/weight complaint you might have about the stick that you just bought, LOL! Clever!
 

SpinaDude

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I don't think it's a silly statement at all. Nor was it a cheap shot at the OP who may very well be a fine player. Even Jojo Mayer in his DVD, Secret Weapons for the Modern Drummer, said he used to break sticks all the time before he got his technique down. Now he rarely, if ever, breaks sticks.

The rigors of arena drumming vs practicing in the bedroom/ playing at a local club is hardly a fair comparison. I know Todd Suchermann breaks a fair amount of sticks, but like you said, he plays mostly arenas, and uses maple drum sticks, which will break sooner than they chip.
Hi guys. I'm the OP. Just saving you the trouble of scrolling back.

No offense taken, at all. The advice is all appreciated.

I don't play everyday. I have no aspirations of being a pro, or even really doing little club gigs. I just play at home for me when the mood takes me. They can be every couple of days, or it can be every couple of months. It depends on where my creative energy takes me. When I'm writing a lot, despite having music of some kind pumping the whole time, I usually have very little focus to grab my sticks. This is just a round about explanation of be explaining that my playing time is very inconsistent. I went for 2 hours straight yesterday playing nearly all hard rock without any kind of warm-up. Is that a good idea? NO! Lol But it's what I do and how the mood takes me.

As for my technique, I dunno. Some things I can do very well. Others, I forever struggle with. Again, because I'm inconsistent. This leads to an uneven flow when moving around the kit because, as far as I'm concerned, I'm not building any muscle memory. Therefore, I'm obviously not refining my technique. Instead I'm often relearning constantly instead of refining.

I know my grip is good and so is my attack. I very rarely drop a stick, and my hands don't cramp. I do tend to tense up, I believe because of the lack of refinement, but I can usually work it right out and relax while keeping the groove. I hit very hard. Not out of intention, it's just how I've always played. I had a lot of issues to work through as a kid and something as primal as beating a drum helped me work through a lot of aggression. I never unlearned that hard hitting. That gets back to my attack, despite me laying into whatever I hit, I get beautiful sounds out of my drums. I rarely choke anything by how I strike it. I also hang my cymbals horizontally and really enjoy the sound and feel of catching splashes and crashes on the edge. That used to chew my sticks up quite a bit, but not so much anymore. I wasn't sure if that was due to me hitting softer as I age or if the stick "formula" had been refined.

I've always been a stick breaker, so I never put a ton of thought into it. I just accepted it for what it was. I've only ever broken one cymbal, and that was an OLD cheaper 14" thin crash.

So is my technique flawed? I would imagine. Again we come back to consistency being the issue. As for whether or not I'm a good drummer...well...tough one to answer. I'm not awful, but I've had days where I had to walk away after 10 minutes or the kit would have wound up in a fire-pit. Just misfiring on every cylinder. I'm as good as what I have a feel for. I have none for jazz at all. I respect it, but I can't do it. And even when I had the meager ability for it back in the day, I didn't enjoy it. My own shortcoming, but one I've grown to accept. Country, no desire. Haven't tried anything latin, but it never really spoke to me. Some of the newer gospel stuff I hear I find incredibly intriguing. The energy really grabs me. But I don't have the chops for so much of it. I think I'm as good as my connection to the music I'm playing. I can really nail the sheeet out of something I love. When I'm really connected to it, if it has a part I can't quite handle (or calls for a double bass) I can usually fudge it or add something new to make it my own. There's no audience, so I'm not letting anyone down. I know my limitations. In the end, as long as I'm happy and reeaaallly sweaty when I'm done, it was a good day behind the kit.

In the end, really no offense taken. I wasn't under attack in any way.
 
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SpinaDude

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FWIW, this is a pic of the other stick I was using yesterday. The splintering is from the rimshots. I don't know if that lends you guys any insight into what my technical flaw(s) could be.
stick.jpg
 
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JDA

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Problems in your ears.. :D
It's a musical (somewhat) melodic instrument (think violin) not a Punching bag (ha!

You have to hear the drums a erm... different way... lol
looks like you
re chopping blocks on the chain gang;
Look at the drums as a more melodic instrument. Try.
Dynamic melodic musical event instead of war (lol!!
Those sticks look like Frankfurt or London after WWII .

Remember you're playing 'notes' not leveling mountains (ha! lol
Do what you want :)
 
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SpinaDude

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Problems in your ears.. :D
It's a musical (somewhat) melodic instrument (think violin) not a Punching bag (ha!

You have to hear the drums a erm... different way... lol
looks like you
re chopping blocks on the chain gang;
Look at the drums as a more melodic instrument. Try.
Dynamic melodic musical event instead of war (lol!!
Those sticks look like Frankfurt or London after WWII .

Remember you're playing 'notes' not leveling mountains (ha! lol
Do what you want :)
I have leveled the occasional mountain.
 
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lrod1707

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Just have fun and play! I'm a hobby drummer as well and unless we wanna become pros, it's about having fun. As long as you have the money to buy new sticks, who cares, Lol!! Enjoy the playing.
 

CherryClassic

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I normally use the Oak series ProMarks. The wood comes from Japan I think. The label on the stick is Shira Kashi Oak, apparently a harder oak than some of the other brands. Because I play the older Country music I use cross stick style probably 75% of the time. In combination with a maple wood Grove Wedge mounted on my snare and the Oak sticks I can get a nice woody like sound which I like much better than metal rim.

I use three different sizes, depending on the band I'm playing with, the location, type song or just how I feel for that gig. LOL
All wood tip sticks:
PW7AW for lower volume venues or finesse playing
PW727W a slightly larger stick and my normal go to stick
707 Ed Shaughnesy series, ball tip when I need that extra edge of a bigger/heavier stick and it's great for long smooth buzz rolls and it also brings out the robust tones from the toms better than the lighter sticks

I don't feel Oak is as responsive as some of the other wood sticks but they tend to stay straighter and seem to last for ever. I believe all stick companies have trouble with consistencies. Last year the Promark Oaks were much lighter in color which made them lighter in weight and less dense in quality. And they didn't sound like the harder darker colored wood. One reason I like to buy from a dealer, to be able to hand pick.

sherm
 

MidiFinger

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I used to play with 747's but I've been working out and those just don't do it for me any more... I have switched to the ProMark 2S Tommy Aldridge Shira Okashi Oak sticks... wow, love em... the are a bit longer and quite a bit heavier and I can really blast the drums with them.
 

lrod1707

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I used to play with 747's but I've been working out and those just don't do it for me any more... I have switched to the ProMark 2S Tommy Aldridge Shira Okashi Oak sticks... wow, love em... the are a bit longer and quite a bit heavier and I can really blast the drums with them.
My go to many years ago were the 747's. Then I switched to regular 5A's till now that my hands hurt and need something thicker like a 5B. I'd like to try the Oaks but I'm afraid that a harder wood is harder on the hands. More vibration!
 

High on Stress

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My go to many years ago were the 747's. Then I switched to regular 5A's till now that my hands hurt and need something thicker like a 5B. I'd like to try the Oaks but I'm afraid that a harder wood is harder on the hands. More vibration!
I find the oak sticks to be fatiguing on my hands. I've only tried one pair (ProMark oak 2Bs) but that was my experience. I now use that pair on the practice pad only. There seems to be a happy medium somewhere between the stick being soft enough to absorb some of the shock instead of your hands and having it be stiff enough to be durable and draw a good tone out of the drums and cymbals. I think for many of us that ends up being hickory but there is always a tradeoff somewhere.
 

SpinaDude

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I used to play with 747's but I've been working out and those just don't do it for me any more... I have switched to the ProMark 2S Tommy Aldridge Shira Okashi Oak sticks... wow, love em... the are a bit longer and quite a bit heavier and I can really blast the drums with them.
I'll have to check those out. I prefer a heavy stick as well. I like the resistance f a heavier stick. Vic Firth and Zildjian sticks always feel airy to me.
 


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