Quality Lauan Shells???

Quality Asian Firewood...Yay or Nay?


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Trilock_Gurtu

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Chris said:
My first set was "Norma".
Second set was "Majestic".
Each set was made from the same luan wood.
Beginner grade cheap drumsets.They served their purpose.
Personally, I wouldn't waste my money.
Once you've upgraded to a quality professional grade drumset,how could you go backwards?
Keep in mind these beginner drumsets have no resale value.
Nah.

How is scoring a awesome sounding vintage kit, with a unique and rare wrap, for a couple of hundred bucks a "waste of money".

I'll tell you what a waste of money is. When I bought my custom DW kit years ago. I special ordered it, waited nine months, paid $8000.00, only to have it sound average...worse yet, generic. THAT'S a waste of money. I learned that eye/ear lesson many years ago. I ended up selling it six months later, for less, of course. You certainly don't make money on used DW gear, but I've double/tripled my money on vintage MIJ kits.

I've had all types of "pro kits"...btw, what is "pro"? Is pro something you've paid a lot for? Nah, that's marketing. You've heard from numerous of pros on here that have tracked with MIJ kits, I have myself, a lot. A engineer I work with asks for my vintage Stewart kit all the time, over my high end Sonor's (he actually prefers my Tear Drop kit over the newer, super expensive ones), my B/B Tama kit, etc etc. "Pro" is what the microphone likes...not what you get suckered into paying.

My first kit was a MIJ Pearl kit...I remember hating it at the time, but it's what my Mom got, so I dealt with it, until I got a "better" kit. I look back now and wished I still had that kit, not so much for sentimental reasons, but sound reasons. It had a SOUND...not some generic, paint by numbers deal.

To each their own, but maybe try listening back, with fresh ears :/
 

Elvis

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^^^+ a million ^^^, and why I have nothing to do with DW. Most vanilla sounding drums I've ever played.
I dig what you're saying about your MIJ's sound, too.
Currently, my Ludwig's are bagged up and stacked in the corner, while I enjoy my 60's Ideal kit.
Sounds great!



Elvis
 

funkypoodle

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Bruzzi said:
Hi,
two years ago I could get some oversea pallets for free... made from luan.
So I removed all the nails and build a drum set to test if this wood sounds good...
The set sounds really good.








I also got some vintage drums made from luan here, some (old Tamas) sound good, other luan shells are badly made and sound terrible.
Seems it depends on the quality of the shell not which wood is used.

Cheers
Bruzzi
Diese sind wunderschn, Bruzzi! I would love to hear them! Please share a video of them if possible! Funny, I'm not usually a fan of black nickel or gold hardware, but it looks amazing on this kit. The "imperfections" in the wood (like under the badge on the snare) and the finish on the stave shells remind me of the beautiful rustic antique furniture I grew up around. Erstaunliche handwerkskunst.
 

Rich K.

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Trilock_Gurtu said:
Interesting thread to pop back up. Lot's of varied thoughts, onions on the subject.

Mine is simple: I use what the situation calls for. I don't care about name brands, looks, anything, expect for the sound outcome. I've had a slightly out of round, crappy edges, MIJ snare track amazing under a mic, and a brand new DW exotic kit sound less then exceptional. It happens.

Problem is, people tend to vote with their biases; by looks, or it's made in a certain country, a favorite drummer plays it, etc etc. I personally quit that way of thinking when I was 19, thanks to an experienced recording engineer, having me LISTEN...playing varies tracks with amazing sounding drums; "that one is a late 60's Pearl stencil kit"..."that's a 70's Yamaha, it's bass drum is out of round to", "this one is a mixture of old Japanese drums, no badges", etc.

Of course he tracked with higher end drums, and they sounded awesome, in general...but the moral of the story is clear: ears, not eyes.

I have many MIA, MIE, and MIJ kits. I have favorites from each, but they all have pros/cons. However, MIJ/Luan kits have had a very bad rap (historically) for a long time, typically by rich hobbyists that need to justify why they blew four mortgage payments on a kit. Hey, to each their own, but don't act like Purdie wouldn't still sound like Purdie on a 70's Pearl wood/fiberglass set. Pleeeeeeease.
'60s MIJ drums usually get a bad rap because structurally they didn't hold up for gigging. And most of them were replaced with all different better made sets that rarely cost 4 mortgage payments.
My Mica set sucked...was happy to have anything else.
 

Trilock_Gurtu

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Rich K. said:
Interesting thread to pop back up. Lot's of varied thoughts, onions on the subject.

Mine is simple: I use what the situation calls for. I don't care about name brands, looks, anything, expect for the sound outcome. I've had a slightly out of round, crappy edges, MIJ snare track amazing under a mic, and a brand new DW exotic kit sound less then exceptional. It happens.

Problem is, people tend to vote with their biases; by looks, or it's made in a certain country, a favorite drummer plays it, etc etc. I personally quit that way of thinking when I was 19, thanks to an experienced recording engineer, having me LISTEN...playing varies tracks with amazing sounding drums; "that one is a late 60's Pearl stencil kit"..."that's a 70's Yamaha, it's bass drum is out of round to", "this one is a mixture of old Japanese drums, no badges", etc.

Of course he tracked with higher end drums, and they sounded awesome, in general...but the moral of the story is clear: ears, not eyes.

I have many MIA, MIE, and MIJ kits. I have favorites from each, but they all have pros/cons. However, MIJ/Luan kits have had a very bad rap (historically) for a long time, typically by rich hobbyists that need to justify why they blew four mortgage payments on a kit. Hey, to each their own, but don't act like Purdie wouldn't still sound like Purdie on a 70's Pearl wood/fiberglass set. Pleeeeeeease.
'60s MIJ drums usually get a bad rap because structurally they didn't hold up for gigging. And most of them were replaced with all different better made sets that rarely cost 4 mortgage payments.
My Mica set sucked...was happy to have anything else.
I've toured A LOT with my varies MIJ set's, never had an issue. I know many others that have as well. Maybe often its the drummer, and not the drums.
 

Big Beat

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The problem with old MIJ drums are due to a simple paradox: those beginner drums are NOT for beginners. A beginner, who hasn't yet even learned to play, much less to maintain a drum set, simply cannot be expected to get the best out of a cheap set that inevitably has - or is prone to develop - some issues. A pro drummer would know how to tune and maintain them and wouldn't have any problem with an MIJ set once it's properly sorted. A beginner wouldn't know how to deal with these issues, which would result in frustration and a conviction that all MIJ drums are crap. Today's beginner drums are good right out of the box and don't usually develop issues unless seriously abused, so this is not really obvious anymore.
 

Elvis

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Two schools of thought on that...

One says, make it easy for the student so they can concentrate on the concept of maintaining and tuning a set of drums, while giving them a (fairly) easily attainable feeling of accomplishment.

The other says, make it somewhat cantankerous, so the student has to learn, from the get-go, not only how to maintain and tune their drums, but experience and solve some of the problems they may encounter while doing so.

One, not necessarily any better than the other, just two different ways of training.



Elvis
 

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