Queen Movie's $1 Billion in Ticket Sales Leads to Film About a Drummer

tdcrjeff

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Bryan Singer was fired partway through production on BoRhap for unprofessional behavior after doing things like not showing up to set for days in a row without warning, getting in shouting matches with the star, etc. So Dexter Fletcher was brought in to salvage it. Not officially credited, though.

If anyone’s seen Eddie the Eagle, also with Taron Edgerton, that was Fletcher, too. And the Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels connection someone mentioned above runs even deeper — that film, BoRhap, Eddie the Eagle and Rocket Man were all produced by the same guy, namely Matthew Vaughn (who directed Edgerton himself in the Kingsman movies).
Interesting, I was just going by official credits.

 

Johnny K

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Bryan Singer was fired partway through production on BoRhap for unprofessional behavior after doing things like not showing up to set for days in a row without warning, getting in shouting matches with the star, etc. So Dexter Fletcher was brought in to salvage it. Not officially credited, though.

If anyone’s seen Eddie the Eagle, also with Taron Edgerton, that was Fletcher, too. And the Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels connection someone mentioned above runs even deeper — that film, BoRhap, Eddie the Eagle and Rocket Man were all produced by the same guy, namely Matthew Vaughn (who directed Edgerton himself in the Kingsman movies).
Matthew Vaughn has had his hand in a couple of other good Brit gangster flicks. Layer Cake and Harry Brown.
 

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Daniel, Your Song and a few others from the early years were powerful compositions . Olsen was a favourite drummer of mine back then .

Beyond that I have zero interest ... maybe less .
 

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I was a big Queen fan right up until "Jazz". After that, I didn't dig their stuff or buy their records. I saw Bohemian Rhapsody, and I liked it, but it was flawed and no way deserving of all those accolades.
I don't think I will see Rocket Man. There's only a small sliver of Elton John's music that I love, and I can't stomach any movie that comes close to being a musical.
A proper movie about Keith Moon would be great, as would a movie about Tony Williams. Problem is, to do them properly, they would need to be four hours long each.
 

Vistalite Black

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I think biopics can be good if they break out of the birth-to-grave formula (which doesn't allow enough time to focus on the best parts).

The thing I liked the best about "Darkest Hour" was that it focused solely on a few days of Winston Churchill's life. Same with "My Week With Marilyn (Monroe)". There was also a pretty good Steve Jobs film built around three product release speeches he made during three different phases of his career.

Moon lived so hard that "Two Sides of the Moon" could be huge. I'd focus it on the making of his solo album. I'd start with an album release party where he'd realize how awful the album was, then recount how much fun he had making it in LA with huge stars like John Lennon, Harry Nilsson, Joe Walsh, John Sebastian, Ringo Starr, Kenney Jones, Jim Keltner, etc. I'd want it to have a real "Boogie Nights" vibe as far as the 70s clothes, cars and rooms.
 

Tigerdrummer

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I loved The Who and Keith in that era. The record store owner who sold me Live at Leeds said they sounded like Led Zepplin on it. Up to then I had only heard their studio stuff w the falsetto voices and wasn't that impressed. From then on I was hooked. Keith was this larger than life character who probably couldn't really be adequately captured. And how would you fake that playing?
 

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Take this all with a grain of salt because it’s something I read maybe 15 years ago or so, but back in the day, as I recall, a Buddy Rich biopic was in development with Benicio del Toro attached to star. Del Toro had become acquainted with Cathy Rich — or may have already been acquainted with her somehow (?). She was very supportive of his casting, though, if I’m remembering correctly. I’d still be down to see that movie.
 

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Bohemian Rhapsody did not win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Another music biopic, Green Book, did.
Correct. 2 for sound, 1 for editing, and one for acting.
That's why I replied to his post with ... "not worth it" ... if he missed that little tidbit, I really couldn't see myself expending the amount of energy necessary to educate the member. A bit much.
 

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Bohemian Rhapsody did not win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Another music biopic, Green Book, did.
When I saw Spike Lee get up in a huff and leave AW I groaned and rolled my eyes. Then I saw both Green Book + BlacKkKlansman and GB verged on not too good while BK wiped all the others off the podium with maybe the exception of The Favourite.

A Moon biopic would be very interesting in these Times with the stench of self destruction rampant. Russell Brand or maybe Sasha Baron Cohen for lead.
 

bongomania

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When I saw Spike Lee get up in a huff and leave AW I groaned and rolled my eyes. Then I saw both Green Book + BlacKkKlansman and GB verged on not too good while BK wiped all the others off the podium with maybe the exception of The Favourite.
Bear in mind, he wasn't huffy because his film didn't win, or because he thought GB wasn't well made. He was mad because the writer of GB significantly changed the true story into one that promotes regressive/demeaning racial tropes.
A Moon biopic would be very interesting in these Times with the stench of self destruction rampant. Russell Brand or maybe Sasha Baron Cohen for lead.
Sascha would devour that role.
 

Hobbs

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Bear in mind, he wasn't huffy because his film didn't win, or because he thought GB wasn't well made. He was mad because the writer of GB significantly changed the true story into one that promotes regressive/demeaning racial tropes.

Sascha would devour that role.
You're too smart for this forum. Go away!

[cue laugh track]

However, GB wasn't well made. That's my onion and I'm sticking it to yuh.
 

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The Keith Moon biopic has been bouncing around for at least twenty-five years now. For a time Mike Myers was attached (remember him?), and rumor has it that Jason Schwartzman (who unlike Myers, is actually a drummer and physically resembles Moon) was interested, though not officially. Given that the gestation period from first pitch to opening can range between five and ten years, and that
no one has yet green-lighted the idea - despite the evidential success of BR and RM - should give one an inkling as to how unlikely the prospect of a Moon biopic is.

Why is because there is no "movie" in Moon's life story, at least not enough story from which to fashion a compelling, three-act structure. Moon's story is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time drumming style who finagles his way into emergent rock band that becomes successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs prescribed to keep him from drinking. Whatever conflict there may have been in Moon's personal or professional life was likely within himself, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: he's fun, except when he isn't; he's crazy, and sometimes he's even crazier.

Still, if one were to to attempt to bring Moon's story to the local multiplex, they would be wise to end it right where it ended for Moon, for the epilogue that follows - Moon is soon replaced and the band continues on - only underscores the fundamental truth that Moon was essentially a footnote in the much larger story of The Who, the sixties youth revolution, and the excesses of the seventies.
 

Vistalite Black

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The Keith Moon biopic has been bouncing around for at least twenty-five years now. For a time Mike Myers was attached (remember him?), and rumor has it that Jason Schwartzman (who unlike Myers, is actually a drummer and physically resembles Moon) was interested, though not officially. Given that the gestation period from first pitch to opening can range between five and ten years, and that
no one has yet green-lighted the idea - despite the evidential success of BR and RM - should give one an inkling as to how unlikely the prospect of a Moon biopic is.

Why is because there is no "movie" in Moon's life story, at least not enough story from which to fashion a compelling, three-act structure. Moon's story is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time drumming style who finagles his way into emergent rock band that becomes successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs prescribed to keep him from drinking. Whatever conflict there may have been in Moon's personal or professional life was likely within himself, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: he's fun, except when he isn't; he's crazy, and sometimes he's even crazier.

Still, if one were to to attempt to bring Moon's story to the local multiplex, they would be wise to end it right where it ended for Moon, for the epilogue that follows - Moon is soon replaced and the band continues on - only underscores the fundamental truth that Moon was essentially a footnote in the much larger story of The Who, the sixties youth revolution, and the excesses of the seventies.
Couple of things:

THE DOORS is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time VOCAL style who finagles his way into emergent rock band that becomes successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs. Whatever conflict there may have been in JIM MORRISON's personal or professional life was likely within himself, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: he's fun, except when he isn't; he's crazy, and sometimes he's even crazier.

A STAR IS BORN, which earned seven Oscar nominations in its 2018 version, is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time VOCAL style who finagles his way into emergent rock band that becomes successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs prescribed to keep him from and drinking. Whatever conflict there may have been in BRADLEY COOPER's personal or professional life was likely within himself, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: he's fun, except when he isn't; he's crazy, and sometimes he's even crazier.

SWEET DREAM is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time VOCAL style who finagles her way into emergent rock band that becomes becoming successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs prescribed to keep him from drinking. her plane crashed into a Tennessee field. Whatever conflict there may have been in Clines's personal or professional life was likely within herselfs, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: She's fun, except when he isn't; She's crazy, and sometimes she's even crazier -- and that's why she sang CRAZY so well. .
 

kallen49

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The Keith Moon biopic has been bouncing around for at least twenty-five years now. For a time Mike Myers was attached (remember him?), and rumor has it that Jason Schwartzman (who unlike Myers, is actually a drummer and physically resembles Moon) was interested, though not officially. Given that the gestation period from first pitch to opening can range between five and ten years, and that
no one has yet green-lighted the idea - despite the evidential success of BR and RM - should give one an inkling as to how unlikely the prospect of a Moon biopic is.

Why is because there is no "movie" in Moon's life story, at least not enough story from which to fashion a compelling, three-act structure. Moon's story is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time drumming style who finagles his way into emergent rock band that becomes successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs prescribed to keep him from drinking. Whatever conflict there may have been in Moon's personal or professional life was likely within himself, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: he's fun, except when he isn't; he's crazy, and sometimes he's even crazier.

Still, if one were to to attempt to bring Moon's story to the local multiplex, they would be wise to end it right where it ended for Moon, for the epilogue that follows - Moon is soon replaced and the band continues on - only underscores the fundamental truth that Moon was essentially a footnote in the much larger story of The Who, the sixties youth revolution, and the excesses of the seventies.
Well, the dear boy did run over his own bodyguard and kill him...there is a story...and if you read Daltry’s recent bio there are a lot more details of Keith’s angst, including his torment over marriage breakup. Always acting the part of “Moon the loon” was a heavy burden. Too bad he died before he got old enough to find some balance.
Having been a fan of the Who for 50 years and seen Keith play a couple of times I would suggest to get an idea of what made Keith famous (and why I loved him), watch the Who live at Isle of Wight from 1970.
 

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Couple of things:

THE DOORS is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time VOCAL style who finagles his way into emergent rock band that becomes successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs. Whatever conflict there may have been in JIM MORRISON's personal or professional life was likely within himself, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: he's fun, except when he isn't; he's crazy, and sometimes he's even crazier.

A STAR IS BORN, which earned seven Oscar nominations in its 2018 version, is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time VOCAL style who finagles his way into emergent rock band that becomes successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs prescribed to keep him from and drinking. Whatever conflict there may have been in BRADLEY COOPER's personal or professional life was likely within himself, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: he's fun, except when he isn't; he's crazy, and sometimes he's even crazier.

SWEET DREAM is about a kid with an unconventional-for-the-time VOCAL style who finagles her way into emergent rock band that becomes becoming successful, and then spends the next several years cultivating a persona for erratic and oftentimes irrational behavior before overdosing on drugs prescribed to keep him from drinking. her plane crashed into a Tennessee field. Whatever conflict there may have been in Clines's personal or professional life was likely within herselfs, which is the most difficult type of conflict to portray on screen: She's fun, except when he isn't; She's crazy, and sometimes she's even crazier -- and that's why she sang CRAZY so well. .
Well, the dear boy did run over his own bodyguard and kill him...there is a story...and if you read Daltry’s recent bio there are a lot more details of Keith’s angst, including his torment over marriage breakup. Always acting the part of “Moon the loon” was a heavy burden. Too bad he died before he got old enough to find some balance.
Having been a fan of the Who for 50 years and seen Keith play a couple of times I would suggest to get an idea of what made Keith famous (and why I loved him), watch the Who live at Isle of Wight from 1970.

I'll do my best to be both brief and as respectful as I can, but your responses clearly show that you both completely missed my point (I won't get into the liberties taken with what I had said). The plot of a feature film must contain an event that so upsets the balance of the main character's life that they are left with no other choice but to take action in an attempt to restore balance. What follows - the plot - are their attempts to regain balance as they come up against the same forces that had caused the imbalance.

No one really knows why Moon behaved as he did, and for all we know, he might have remained "Moon the Loon" had he not OD'd. The life of Keith Moon doesn't have an event that set him off on a quest, and while some filmmakers might try to get around this obstacle by inserting invented characters and events - as Oliver Stone did with the little surreal snippets of Native American and occult mysticism in The Doors to explain why Morrison was so determined and charismatic, and yet so utterly selfish and self-destructive - accidentally killing a chauffeur, or the lingering unhappiness over a divorce, or dressing up like an SS officer and giving a Nazi salute while standing up in an open car as it cruises the main drag of a prominently-Jewish neighborhood are at best anecdotal scenes that might define a character but do not further a plot; they're just things that happened for unconnected reasons. In life, things may seem to happen one after the other, but in movies, one thing happens because of the other. Biopics - especially ones about contemporary figures - are hard to pull off because writers have to find ways to present unrelated events in a way that makes them seem related without making the story incredulous, and if there was sufficient plasticity in Moon's life story to do such, someone would've done it already.
 

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