Question for the pros about studio recording

rsq911

Very well Known Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
1,415
Reaction score
301
Hi everyone!

Quick question for the pro drummers, Bun E, Trey, etc... When you go in for a recording gig, how much say-so do you have in the gear choices, tuning, effects, etc...? Do you walk in to it with gear already there, or do "they" (artist/s and producer), leave it up to you?
At least for me, with symphony work, it is up to us and the conductor, and what little studio work I have done, which was with friends, was left up to my discretion.
Thanks!
 

Trey Gray

Pro
Joined
Feb 20, 2007
Messages
1,098
Reaction score
1,021
Location
South Bend, IN
If I'm a hired gun in the studio, it's all about the producer more than the artist generally. For me anyway.

If I'm producing a band I'll spend a month or 2 in pre-production getting arrangements and sounds down. Gear choices etc...I don't want the guys, especially the drummers, to feel overwhelmed by making them change every piece of gear and sound that they're used to...so we compromise.

If it's an artist and I'm picking the players, and playing as well, I generally have spent time enough with the artist to know the direction of the sound we want and what drums, amps, keys etc. we need to achieve what's in out heads.

I hope this helps...have a great weekend,
cheers and blessings, tg
 

lawsater

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
130
Reaction score
65
Location
australia
It changes with the situation you are in, if there is more time in pre - production it gives you a good feel for whats needed, other times you walk into the studio and know very little of whats ahead. In most cases for me I use my own gear so most of the time I have a few snares to change around and generally get the tuning to where I think it works, it would be very rare for someone to ask me to swap cymbals or hi hats in my experience.The producer and engineer will have a good idea of what mics to use as most of the time they will have their preferred way of doing things,familiarity with the room and console helps a lot as well.Sometimes you can spend very little time getting a sound other times you may change things around a bit and experiment a bit, one producer that I have worked with Kevin Shirley always spends the time to try different mics and positions to get what he wants he always invests the time, others will approach it differently.The other thing to consider is you are there because someone wants you there and your playing and sound is what they are after, so its something that should be a collaboration.
 

rsq911

Very well Known Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
1,415
Reaction score
301
Excellent, excellent, excellent!
 

cruddola

Very well Known Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
954
Reaction score
920
Location
usa
Relate it to residential construction. Everything rides on who's putting out the money for the production. Budget decides everything. Budget decides location. Budget decides time allotted to do the project. Budget decides who gets hired and doesn't. As for taking on a drum recording session, every producer usually has a program/work flow that works for them. Everybody is different. The vast majority know what they DON'T want. I've done sessions where they already have their cymbal recipe with the drums tuned and all I had to do was walk in the door and play to their script until they're satisfied, walk out and 30 days later I got a check in the mail. That's a track-home budget. Then there are the very generous and liberal-budgeted projects where the producer will spend the time to get what they want and even explore alternatives. Those are real fun especially when some producers have asked me what I got to add to the table. Them are far and in between so I cherish every moment. Them are Bel Aire budgets. Then there are my favorite recording sessions. The Mexicans. With those guys you are a team member and are expected to give your input. If you wanna do it differently they'll oblige, regardless of instrument you play. The producers I've worked with are stellar folks. They might not be wealthy, but they fly you in, put you up at a nice hotel even have a driver/concierge assigned to you 24/7. I've known of hired musicians to make use of their selection of 'mattress-mates'. No thanks! Do drugs, you'll be fired and never hired again. No studio will take you as the word will be put out. They have warehouses full of instruments that other studios pool out of. Everything. From Ayotte to Yamaha. Yes, even top line Sonor. They are partial to Paiste, Yamaha and Ludwig Mahogany drums. Sometimes they'll ask you what you want. The project is discussed in detail at breakfast in the studio as they have their own commercial-sized kitchens. No booze or beer except beer or wine at dinner. Some even have two-dozen bedroom suites. Those are my favorite. They like to do the whole band live. Everybody at once. Nobody does it better than the folks south of the line. So your dynamics had better be golden! Rehearsal takes place while the recorders run non-stop. Tweaking and adjustments are made. The recorders never stop. Lunch takes place and more discussions take place. Then it's laying down the music. They get exactly what they want in two takes max. 90% of the time it's the first take. You stay until the mixdown is done incase you're needed. That's where the studio's bed room suites come in handy. They're palatial. Once completed it's a celebratory party at a resort. Nobody beats their pay. It's on your seating place at the dinner table. That's Castle-building. No such animal in the States! Bottom line, you're paid to do it THEIR way.
 
Last edited:


Top