Re cut bearing edges vs resale value

JDA

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What you have to do is Buck the Trends...start..

CHARGING EXTRA for "bearing edges professionally done by (insert professional name here) .
That will flip the market and then, you'll hear " I ain't paying that much for those. The bearing edges haven't been done yet...." Or " Do you know the last time the edges were cut?"

:0 lol Flip the Script
 
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kb

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Every Stradivarius and Amati violin (and countless other early instruments) being played today has been altered. Principally the bass bar under the bridge, but other things as well.

None of these fine violins (or violas, celli or basses) are "factory original."

I'm not sure how this translates to drums, but I'm just a guy who plays music for a living, not a museum curator....
 

markrocks68

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I am first a player.
Second a collector.
Third a curator.
So yes it's a big deal to me.
I play ALL the kits. I gig quite a bit and I spend the time to tune them to sound good.
I try different heads combos on all the drums. Sometimes going back to old faithful Remo Coated Ambassadors but not always.
I even play the kits with the original heads and many of them still have them on there. I won't buy a set if it's been altered in any way shape or form. No matter how rare the finish.
Thats my cup of tea. Originality is everything for me. I want to go back in time. To be transported with the music on the instrument. It's really a high for me.
Drums are meant to be played. It's my job to do that and to keep them in the most excellent shape I possibly can.
And taking care of and playing these wonderful old all original instruments is my addiction.
 

ARGuy

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Every Stradivarius and Amati violin (and countless other early instruments) being played today has been altered. Principally the bass bar under the bridge, but other things as well.

None of these fine violins (or violas, celli or basses) are "factory original."

I'm not sure how this translates to drums, but I'm just a guy who plays music for a living, not a museum curator....
It doesn't translate to drums.

Not all of them are even being played - some are in the hands of museum curators.

 

ARGuy

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jptrickster

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Actually, some of them don't even get played full time.
Amazing some are still being played 300+ yrs old. What’s also amazing nobody can replicate the sound , some serious mojo magic Strad was the chosen one.
 

Tommy D

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I have recut edges on vintage round badge Gretsch kits, Ludwig's, Slingerlands, etc. All the drums had horrible edges from the factory. No where close to being level. Heck, the round badge snare I just took apart has the snare bed off center from the wires.

If you call shoddy craftsmanship "mojo", then you should look in to nice set of CB Percussion drums. They have mojo for days. I prefer drums that tune up, stay in tune and sing, sing, sing.
 

Bri6366

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I get the Caddy Green Birdland kit reference , possibly a 25k kit you don’t want to alter, it’s serious history and mojo, the drum gods would frown upon theee. On the other hand a 70’s 3 pc Ludwig kit might sell for 12-1400 , edges get re cut your going to get half that. No big loss especially if you made some music with them.
I get the Birdland kit as well. As far as the 70s Ludwigs it's more about the sound. If they sound good, don't mess with them. If recutting the edges will improve the sound then I would do it. I think you could market the kit either way as long as the edges were cut to original specs.
 

marko52

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I think it's easier to sell a kit with original edges, even if it may not sound too good. I've never turned down a kit because of the sound--there are just too many options to try to improve the sound, ie: tuning, new heads, maybe a slight leveling of the edges. On the other hand, it's harder to sell a kit with re-cut edges for full price, regardless of the sound, simply because buyers are always looking for a reason to try & talk the price down, & we've convinced each other that original bearing edges are sacrosanct. my 2c..............marko
 

shilohjim

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If you recut the edges to the original profile, how would anyone know they were altered?
 

Tommy D

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If you recut the edges to the original profile, how would anyone know they were altered?
Because they would be level and true, and the drum would sound really good.

Oh, burn...

Seriously though, a lot of vintage drums have the edges painted from the factory. I've seen silver sealer on Gretsch drums, white paint on old Ludwigs and taupe on old Slingerlands. The fresh cut edges are clean, fresh wood. No paint.
 

155

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I dont see any prob with it at all, if they arent playable what good are they? just restore them to spec and all good
 

tommykat1

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I think the bottom line is, if the edges on an original kit have been screwed up through someone's carelessness, then they need to be recut, or sanded down by a handy craftsman.

That's what I did to this horrendously abused 12" Rogers B&B tom. The edge on this particular drum from 1959 or 1960 was rounded-ish anyway, ie, not the 45 degree edge that Rogers introduced a few years later. So I did it myself, and the drum tunes up and sounds great.

After removing the hardware and reconditioning the metal pieces, I lightly sanded the bearing edges, then masked them off, as well as the paper tag, and painted with matching gray primer from a spray can.

I also wet-sanded the shell with 2000 emery cloth, then followed up with the Meguiars products shown.

To be certain I had a long lasting, gigable drum, I strengthened the uncracked B&B lugs using the method I pioneered roughly twelve years ago with Propoxy20 epoxy putty.

The result is a clean, gigable and reliable Rogers B&B tom tom.

1 Top View Before, Partial.jpg


2 Top View After, Partial.jpg


3 Bottom View, Before.jpg


4 Bottom View, After .jpg


Wet Sanding.jpg


Repair Lugs & Tool.jpg
 

TheElectricCompany

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Here's an example of someone overestimating the value of a re-edged drum. $750 for a champagne Downbeat snare is completely insane to begin with. But with re-cut edges? Maybe it's one of those "Okay, I'll sell some drums, honey" situations.

 

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