Re cut bearing edges vs resale value

jptrickster

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I always laugh at that cliche sales pitch ‘one of my best snares’ Yeah , liked it so much I sold it lol!!

In reality It probably does sound better than new with the Precision tune up, Ludwig edges late 60’s early 70’s were an atrocities. If you compare early 60’s edges with late 60’s you’ll see what I mean and you probably all ready know that but the new guy might not. Pre serial ( pre Ringo) 60’s toms sing in comparison.

At least and at best he had the work done by a reputable pro shop, that definetly helps. Remember Nodar’s edges?!
 

TheElectricCompany

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I always laugh at that cliche sales pitch ‘one of my best snares’ Yeah , liked it so much I sold it lol!!

In reality It probably does sound better than new with the Precision tune up, Ludwig edges late 60’s early 70’s were an atrocities. If you compare early 60’s edges with late 60’s you’ll see what I mean and you probably all ready know that but the new guy might not. Pre serial ( pre Ringo) 60’s toms sing in comparison.

At least and at best he had the work done by a reputable pro shop, that definetly helps. Remember Nodar’s edges?!
Who is Nodar?
 

jptrickster

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Oh man he must be before your time, I assumed everyone knew Nodar. Ok now I know I'm old.
He worked in NYC out of Modern Drum shop and had his own shop as well.
Was the go to guy for vintage cymbal and drum repars........not always the best lol
 

clowndog

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Someone asked about what the value implication is. I'll put myself out there having resold hundreds of vintage snares, many for pro drummers. A very rough approach for me is expect 50% value hit for a refinished drum and 30% hit for refinished edges. Now, there are many variables and each situation is unique, but I would be confident recommending this a rough starting point to assess.
 

DolFan54

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It depends on the drum and if it has collectibility value. I have a WMP Ludwig Pioneer that wobbled so badly on a flat surface that I had the edges cut and now it tunes up great. If it were a 20’s Ludwig in peacock pearl I’d leave the edges alone and probably flip it.

Just remember once you cut the edges the drum will never be original again.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I'm more of a "buy the barn find and try to restore as much as you can and still have an incredible and playable drum" versus the "buy a mint drum and be careful playing, scratching or bumping it" kind of guy........a rat rod Ferrari is still a Ferrari!

Relic outlaw jazz drummer here!
 

DanC

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Guitars can be refretted, have the pickups changed, bridge replaced, and have the finish half worn off, but the guit-players will still drool over an old Strat and pay $20,000 for it.

Horn players will look at a tarnished old sax that has been revalved etc, and shell out $8-10k for it (or so I've been told by horn players I trust).

I've heard that old Hammond B3's can bring money that could be a down payment on a house (anyone know if this is true?), even if well worn, even if refinished.

Drums are in a different category from other instruments. We like them to look sharp, and collectors value originality above all else. There is not much on a drum that will alter it's sound in a big way, except for bearing edges. Do this on a vintage drum, and it's value is seriously compromised. And excellent vintage drums bring a fraction of what those guitars will bring. Why? Maybe we don't respect our instrument in the same way, or maybe drummers are just cheap...

Also, a new drumset will depreciate significantly from it's new cost in most cases. I don't think this is the case with guitars, which is another indicator of how differently they are valued in the marketplace.
 

JDA

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I have two WFL. 6.5 6 luggers. One remains in it's bone stock everything but heads condition.
The other was modded by the drum Doctors in LA. (cool right? ) Allen screws, edges, tiny tweaks all over it.

last night I played one right after the other.

The original one is soft. Now both are tuned the same..

What I think bearing edge recut does is... it takes away the soft wood- which over time happens to any drum (right? 'specially at the edge right?)

And exposes fresh hard wood.
So that's a- difference.
Takes away the feathery gathered over time and replaces it with a hard re-start
(I know makes no sense lol) hard to describe..
But could be seen as a re-start re-birth. If you have another 40 years around..
 
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JazzDrumGuy

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I refinished a vintage Ludwig "jazzette" kit last year. The PO (prior owner!) had the edges done in a sharp dual 45 degree angle, not even recut to factory specs. They sound amazing. Yes, they also were rewrapped in chrome plastic & the white inside sanded down and veneered, so a "player" kit on many levels, but they are open, vintage, warm and have great tone! I did my best to restore them to factory look both inside & out, but I kept the edges because 1) I don't have tools to recut, and 2) did I mention they sound great!

I also redid a 20's solid shell Ludwig snare last year. I didn't want to redo the edges but took it to a local drum craftsman who pointed out the shell didn't sit flat and the edges were clearly uneven. I didn't hesitate to get them redone (perfectly) with the exact same profile as before, and he also waxed them. The drum is pure wood tone and no regrets there.......that drum also was a barn find and I refinished it as it has a birdseye maple outer veneer, found vintage parts (and aged some of my own new parts) and it is a nearly 100 year old vintage item that is fully functional and I'd gig anywhere.
 

bkny110

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There's no violinist afraid that their 40 million dollar violin will be unwanted after it's worked on to make it sound and play better. They're just very careful to go to the right shop.
Apples and Oranges
 

tkillian

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I recently sent out my Ludwig Coliseum to Precision Drum Company to get it rewrapped in BDP.

They said the edges were out of whack and do I want them recut...fixed.

I said NO....because the drum sounds great as it is.

They said....well, that's all that matters is if you like the sound.

Now THAT is my kind of company! I will always send my stuff to precision drum company.

THe drum sounds great (to me anyway)....even with weird edges. And its a joy to play.


 


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