Re-edging Remo acousticon drums?

ToBBa

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Hi all.
Does any of you have any experiance with cutting new bearing edges on remo drums made with acousticon?
If i have understood it correct, acousticon is wood fibres mixed with an epoxy resin wich should make it a very hard material.
can i use the normal router bit i use on regular wood shells, or will i need a special bit, like those used on acrylics? I have done edges on pretty hard/high density woods like cocobolo, purpleheart etc before with out problems.

if any of you have some experience on working with acousticon, i would love your advise! Thanks
 

xsabers

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Interesting question. Fortunately, my REMO drums have great edges. I don't know if the Acousticon can be worked like wood or not. Better to ask before trying it though.
 

xsabers

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There was a company a few years ago that was promoting removable edges but I don't think they ever got off the ground. Don't know about Keller.
 

EvEnStEvEn

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I think it would depend on which series/version/era of Acousticon you have.
My Remo Masteredge drums have the moulded bearing edges, which, according to Remos' literature can be re-shaped if needed.
I don't know if this would apply to other Acousticon versions, I suppose you could try cutting one of the resonant side edges first.
If your drums are the later series (mid 90s and beyond) shells, it should be okay, because those shells are strong and tough with sharp bearing edges, anyway.
 

1up2dn

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the shells are basically thick craft paper soaked in some kind of resin and wound tight on a mandrel...

they definitely got better/more durable in the later versions...but the fact that they eventually put a molded polymer bearing edge on those shells should give a clue as to their hardness...
 

ToBBa

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Thank you for all of your inputs! Most appreciated!
The drum in question is a Remo Mastertouch I believe. I don't own the drum.
The last 3 years or so I have been doing a lot of work for other people on their drums, this has eventually evolved into a small part time business. I mostly do reparations, modifications and restorations. I also build some snares every now and then...I very often get asked to cut toms down to make them shallower, this is also the case with this remo drum.
As the drum is to loose 1 or 2 " in depth I could always do some "practise" on the scrap, but if that don't turn out any good, like if the router tears out big chunks of "wood" it would be kind of dumb sitting there with a tom that is 2" shorter, but doesn't have a bearing edge... Don't want to go to the client and tell him that I made a Concert tom out of his drum...

Didn't know that there were different kinds of acousticon, but I'm no expert obviously on remo drums... I can remember playing, and doing a head change on a backline kit 14x3 remo piccolo snare some years ago. The shell on that drum seamed very massive and strong, just like those resin fibreboards that are used for scaffolding, formwork and stuff.

I'm not quite shure if I will accept this assignment, so some more info on acousticon and how it handles on the router table would be much appreciated.
T
 

EvEnStEvEn

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Mastertouch are the later, better, shells made in the 90s, so I think you'll be safe to modify the edges using a sharp router bit.
 

Imposing Will

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I've done it. Sharp router bit, cuts great. I sanded after, then coated with poly. Still have a snare shell, and it looks like it did when I cut it.
 

thin shell

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They are pretty much a type of Masonite so you should be able to work them with regular woodworking tools.
 

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