Recommend me a Zildjian China

CAMDRUMS

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I have been trying to find a light Zildjian China or swish that is similar to my favorite Paiste T20 prototype China which is light and mellow. So far the Zildjians I have come across are all heavy and too harsh or too gongy. I recently got to play a Sabian HHX Chinese 18” and really liked it. Can anyone recommend me a Zildjian. Similar to this Sabina?
 

mass_marauder

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IMO, Zildjian doesn’t really make a China that fits that description. I never truly loved a China cymbal until I got a Meinl Byzance 18” extra dry China. Check it out. It’s soft and mellow and trashy. If it has to be zildjian, sorry I can’t help.
 

JDA

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I have been trying to find a light Zildjian China or swish that is similar to my favorite Paiste T20 prototype China which is light and mellow. So far the Zildjians I have come across are all heavy and too harsh or too gongy.
plain 20" Avedis Swish but a quick look on ebay are all from the Japan sellers and are triple average price. Search for one. 20" plain swish (not Knocker

.
 
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drummingbulldog

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I have a 14" K Mini China that's awesome. It's light & beautiful. It cuts more like a razor instead of a chainsaw. You can play it in quiet spots.
 

John DeChristopher

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Zildjian 20” Oriental China Classic. They were discontinued many years ago. Once in a while one will show up on EBay, it took me 2 years to find one. Then one day I saw it on Reverb and got it in a New York second!!
Highly recommended
Good suggestion. Also the 19" K Hybrid chinas are pretty trashy. At least, they used to be.
 

Dumpy

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Please note the following: there has not been a forever China in my collection. I only like them AFTER I get rid of them.

Every Zildjian china I have ever had was nothing but cut. I foolishly sold an original engraved Paiste Signature china. After realizing how great it truly was on recordings, I can’t find one that doesn’t cost a Zillion dollars. It cut when it needed to, but I could play jazz if I were so inclined. But Zildjian Chinas? Maybe a larger K?
 

Dumpy

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Dave Mattacks looks like he's using a 20" Oriental. Those cymbals are pretty aggressive in person, but sound nice at a distance + under mics
Which is why I stopped trusting my ears from behind the kit when it comes to Chinas. I used a cosmetically modified Zildjian Oriental (don’t ask how my buddy added patina) and hated the sound from behind the kit. Out front, it added great accents.
 

philmets

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Older Zildjian A 20” China Boy Low, beautiful sounding cymbal, love mine.
 

charlesm

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Almost every Zildjian china I've ever played has had a quality of making me feel it would sound so much better if it were at least 100g lighter. Too much clang and not enough trash.

They just tend to make them too damned heavy. That said, there ARE the occasional gems out there.

I have a 19" K Custom Dark China that sounds pretty nice for a Z china. It has a good mix of attack, trash and airiness. Not too gongy. It's more "kooosh" than "clang."

As with so many things about Zildjian, imo, that are missing from their catalog, the solutions seem simple and obvious...and yet, bafflingly, they will not address them.

One such issue IS that of offering a great-sounding china; it's gotta be on the THIN side, but I sometimes feel that Zildjian is afraid of the idea of things that are fundamentally thin. Wary of breakage and warranty returns. Well, that can be addressed to some degree with the right marketing and informational language.

However, to start, for example, just bring out 20" and 22" chinas in the K Custom Dark line and keep them thin. Maybe do the same in the Special Dry line...and not the ones with all the holes, just traditional china designs.

Such cymbals are almost guaranteed to sound great and would probably sell well, since it's a gigantic hole in Zildjian's catalog that's been there for years...CONSISTENTLY good-sounding, musical chinas. Not just chinas for metal thrashers.

It's just waiting there on a silver platter for them to manufacture--and yet, I don't think they will. Too much "safe" thinking. Maybe one day.
 

Redfern

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As far as an accent piece goes, especially in that vein of a China, swish, oriental, et. al., aside from its name, the Zildjian Crash of Doom can be crashed, accented with and even ridden on to a certain extent...the larger you go the more Cush it has...20”, 22” and the elusive 24” “CoD” have been soft yet powerful pieces in my experience.
 

bassanddrum84

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I love the zildjian 19” ultra hammered also love the oriental 18” but my favorite is a 18” paiste rude. And I love zildjian but to me that paiste just has a great sound.
 
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hsosdrum

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For accents I use a 17" K China Boy that's on the thin side (979g) and is pretty mellow sounding. I got it in the mid-'80s and had the shop install 6 rivets, which mellowed it out even more. It's a total keeper. For riding I have a 22" Swish Knocker, but it's late-'90s vintage and on the heavy side (2422g), so it clangs a bit more than I'd prefer. If I can find a more recent one that's between 2100g and 2200g and has a more explosive-sounding crash I'll grab it.

I think Zildjian's still bruised from all the returns they had to eat in the early '70s, when idiots who don't know the proper way to hit a cymbal* were breaking thinner cymbals by the thousands. That's why they added metal to every model starting in the mid-'70s (I think it was then — John DeChristopher can verify exactly when they started making everything too friggin' heavy).

*To be fair to said idiots, in 1974 our band got a guitar player who played through a full Marshall stack, prompting the keyboard and bass players to likewise acquire louder amplification. In the months following that I broke two 18" crashes, a 20" crash and a 14" top hi-hat cymbal. After we started mic-ing the drums at every gig I never broke another cymbal (and haven't to this day).
 


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