Recommendations for beginner song sheet music (hal leonard etc)

michaelg

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Looking for recommendations for this sort of thing


This one ok or can you think of any other good ones with a good selection on them ?

Thanks
 

cworrick

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The one BIG problem I see with books like this is by the time they go through all the hoops they need to in order to finally be published, most of the songs are outdated for their target buyers (young beginners). Looking at the titles in that book there are only 1 or two that a young beginner might have heard of. Kids today want to play what they hear on the radio NOW, not what was on the radio before they were born.

There are several web-sites that put out "sheet music" for today's music, HOWEVER, when I have looked at them they either have quite a few mistakes in them, or are written using some made up kind of notation. Research them carefully before using them with students.
 

michaelg

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Thanks Christopher

Its actually for myself and i'm not fussy about what tunes they are,,, I just want some practice on watching the bars go by in a musical setting.
 

Hop

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Well you're in the right neighborhood with the Hal Leonard stuff. Another publisher to look into is Alfred.
Since it's for you, I'd just grab some titles with songs you already know/like or always wanted to learn and go for it.

I've got a half-dozen of these kind of titles & think these are pretty good tools that are reasonably priced, and many have play-along tracks by cover bands included in the package (yea!!!... no band BS).
  • I like to refer to them when I'm having trouble figuring out what the drummer is doing/can't quite "hear" what the drum part is.
  • I also like to play the actual artist recoding and then follow along while reading (w/o playing) the transcript to help force my eyes forward/get my eye more accustomed moving on the page.
  • Also they can serve as reference if you're trying to transcribe other drum parts.... "Hmmm... how do you write this figure?" or "How do simplify this part/passage/beat that I've written out?"
 

bernard

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Thanks Christopher

Its actually for myself and i'm not fussy about what tunes they are,,, I just want some practice on watching the bars go by in a musical setting.
If you want to gain some "real world"-like experience in reading drum charts and playing along to different styles of music, I can highly recommend the Tommy Igoe Groove Essentials books and playalongs. (Haven't seen the DVDs, but I hear these are good as well.)
The Igoe drum charts shows a lot of concepts that you will actually encounter on a real gig, not at all like the note-by-note transcriptions found in magazines and most other books.
 

michaelg

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I received a Hal Leonard "first 50 songs you should play on drums" book this morning and its very good, just what i was after, to get my eyes used to moving forward on reading, Id never play a pop song like this mind.

One thing i find difficult while going thru it is having to figure out the length of a phrase (in pop for instance its usually a certain number of bars long ,typically 4 or 8).
The way this book is written, and like much sheet music, it does not make finding the form of the tune very obvious and actually makes the form hard to see , for me anyways.

When presented with a new formal sheet of music , do you usually scan over it and try to see the form first before playing it ,,,as in counting bars and looking for double bar-lines ?
 

Hop

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You're right Michael, none of these books chart the form or provide any supplemental song info (i.e. slow change blues, fast shuffle, etc... I think the exception is the Igoe material). That would be a great addition to have that kind of info. Maybe they assume the purchasers are already proficient sight readers?

Maybe you could use some different color highlighters and place a mark above the A, B, C, sections to help identify them? Or use a color to mark the length of a phrase being played over the drum part? I'd take that book and copy a few pages and then play around with ways to mark it up till you hit on something that works for you.
Or even type up and print out a basic form chart outlined in this thread: https://www.drumforum.org/threads/counting-bars-in-charts-help.154823/#post-1704290
 

michaelg

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Thanks Hop, I've started doing something like that.
For example was just examining the drum music sheet for "Beat it" by Micky Jackson.

If i count the bars in each section before attempting to sight read it and write a big 16 (bars) next to the verse and big 8(bars) next to the chorus, i can instantly begin to hear the form as the song plays.

But when reading the sheet music alone as written, its almost like they are disguising the form.

Still its a cool book, just reading over songs i know and seeing how the different patterns and fills i know so well are notated.
Lots of tunes i don't know as well so plenty to work with.
 

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