Recommended Ride Cymbal for Small Jazz Kit?

Seb77

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 11, 2013
Messages
2,178
Reaction score
795
Location
Germany
I agree just a regular old ride cymbal sound makes most sense to me if you're starting out playing jazz. I don't know where the idea comes form that you should get a specialty cymbal (heavy hats, dry ride etc.) to learn with, not what I would recommend. Get a good all-round sound that you can use and sound good on in many contexts and that inspires you when you play it. As good an instrument as you can afford that fits most styles.
An all-purpose ride should have both a clear stick and a good long-decay wash that connects the beats even at slow tempos. Not to high, not too low. For jazz, it's most important that it's not too loud, espeically if you plan to play in a small group and in a small room. I would say 20" A a round 1800-2000g would be a great start.Smaller if you like a compact kit, i.e. if your space is confined.
 

D. B. Cooper

DFO Veteran
Joined
Oct 18, 2009
Messages
2,325
Reaction score
764
Another option, which may not be a popular one around here, is to get a big, super thin, Turkish pie.

Look through this list:

Or better yet, search Masterwork:

There's super light, interesting cymbals in any size you'd need.
If I could only have one cymbal, I'd want it to be really interesting. Dark and shankable.

Get a standard 20".

Or go crazy and get a 23" or a 26"!
Why not?

I mean, it's not the most versatile option out there, but when you need a heavier ride, they are incredibly cheap right now, too.

You could order a brand new Zildjian A 20".

Or

You could get a thin Masterwork for jazz at those crazy prices and then a 20" K Heavy or regular Ride for a crazy cheap and then have two cymbals that do their task better than the Vanilla A, which wouldn't do either extremely well, anyways


Just an idea.
 

jansara

Very well Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2005
Messages
540
Reaction score
325
Forget about dry, wet, damp, rivets, sizzle, wash, clicks, dark, bright, hard, soft, well-done, over-easy, rare, big, small and all other rampant forms of OCD commonly encountered in the art. Get a decent used ride cymbal inside your budget and learn how to play, first. Knowing how to play Jazz is more about your abilities than it is about your gear.
 

JimmySticks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
374
Reaction score
329
Location
Queens NY
I had an Agop Xist dark/dry 19" ride, and I just never got used to it or liked it's sound. It really sounded like any anonymous piece of sheet metal would. It was as dry as burned toast with no butter. It had no sustain or wash whatsoever, so as soon as I left the ride to do a fill, there was this immediate and complete lack of any cymbal sound, which to me, left a big hole in my sound. So I would stay away from the these dark/dry cymbals for awhile, especially if this is your first and only cymbal. There just not very versatile.

Sorry to add to your confusion, but welcome to the wonderful world of, "The Perfect Ride Cymbal"! :icon_lol:
 

JimmySticks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
374
Reaction score
329
Location
Queens NY
Forget about dry, wet, damp, rivets, sizzle, wash, clicks, dark, bright, hard, soft, well-done, over-easy, rare, big, small and all other rampant forms of OCD commonly encountered in the art. Get a decent used ride cymbal inside your budget and learn how to play, first. Knowing how to play Jazz is more about your abilities than it is about your gear.
We posted at the same time, and my post below yours sort of mirrors what you are saying.

Get a decent used A Zildjian which you can find pretty easily at your price range. They are very versatile and can do it all. I don't think you'll be sorry.
 

Elvis

The King of Rock'n'Roll
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
12,887
Reaction score
1,350
Location
Poulsbo, Wa.
ZENDRUMS,

This might work for ya....https://reverb.com/item/23046497-sabian-20-ride

Included in the seller's description of the cymbal is this passage...This is an older Sabian 20" Ride Cymbal. It has a moderate amount of stick marks, fingerprints and discoloration. It shows no Key holing dents, dings or cracks. It delivers a mellow medium bright tone. It's a fairly quiet cymbal perfect for smaller venues or the studio.

I believe the logo on the underside of the cymbal denotes it as an "AA" (Sabian's version of an A.Zildjian).
A good "all-around cymbal", as some have mentioned.
Good luck.


Elvis
 

zendrums

Member
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
10
Reaction score
4
The feedback here is incredible. So helpful and so many ideas! I have an opportunity to get either of these 2 cymbals for the same price:
Is the A Zildjian the absolute way to go for jazz?
 

Elvis

The King of Rock'n'Roll
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
12,887
Reaction score
1,350
Location
Poulsbo, Wa.
...absolutely....do the A and realize that this is the sound that permeates a lot more Jazz than some are willing to admit to.
 

Elvis

The King of Rock'n'Roll
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
12,887
Reaction score
1,350
Location
Poulsbo, Wa.
Pretty tubby for a flat. I bet it'll blend in real nice with some of your K's, though.
 

Tama CW

DFO Veteran
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Messages
2,080
Reaction score
1,203
Location
SE Connecticut
The feedback here is incredible. So helpful and so many ideas! I have an opportunity to get either of these 2 cymbals for the same price:
Is the A Zildjian the absolute way to go for jazz?
Sure, but don't pay over $150 for that 50's or 60's A's. I sold several this year in the 1780-2100 gm range for $75-$135 depending on condition, weight, and sound. $80-$120 is quite achievable. But that 20" HHX will probably be multiples of that.
 

zendrums

Member
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
10
Reaction score
4
I sold several this year in the 1780-2100 gm range for $75-$135 depending on condition, weight, and sound.
I have been looking all around for 50's or 60's A's at approximately 2000 grams with a video/audio sample. I am trying to find warm and not bright as advised here. Can't seem to find!
 

Seb77

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 11, 2013
Messages
2,178
Reaction score
795
Location
Germany
I have been looking all around for 50's or 60's A's at approximately 2000 grams with a video/audio sample. I am trying to find warm and not bright as advised here. Can't seem to find!
A good A to my ear is both warm and bright. They all differ somewhat, and people like different things about them. If you see one that's reasonably cheap and looks nice, it's not much of a risk even without soundfile. Keep it a while and get to know it. I did this once and got a cymbal I wouldn't have picked by sound at the time, but later on found very useful.
Wasn't there a link to an early Sabian above? That one would qualify imo. Descriptions can also be telling, this one was referred to as "quiet", which might be just what you want.
 

JimmySticks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
374
Reaction score
329
Location
Queens NY
If this is going to be your only ride for awhile, than find an A, pretty much any A. It's just really versatile and can handle all styles of music pretty handily. I say that because while your playing jazz now, you may want to do some rock, funk, or blues to change things up. A flat ride or a strictly dark dry ride isn't versatile enough IMHO to do that.

And take it from guys here, this will not be your last and final ride. It's likely only the beginning of long winding road to ride cymbal nirvana.:)
 

AZsabianprez

Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
5
Reaction score
3
Hello Community,

I am a new drummer and am looking to learn jazz drumming. I am in the process of piecing together a small kit. I have a 5"x12" snare and 7"x18" bass (TAMA Club-Jam Mini) and just picked up used Sabian HHX 13" Groove Hi-Hats.

I am looking for recommendations for a ride cymbal. Since my drums are small and my hi-hats are small, I was leaning toward a 20" or 21" ride rather than a 22"--I was thinking the 20" or 21" ride might match the volume of the smaller drums and hi-hats.

With jazz in mind, would a Sabian HHX Groove 21" Ride be a good fit? I was reading up that some consider it to be more suitable for funk than jazz. I am also considering a Sabian HHX Legacy 20" Ride. I am trying to spend ~$175 which will likely be hard to find.
Hi Zendrum. We’re working on a new program where you tell us what type of sound you’re looking for and we send you a few from which to choose.
We’ll pick the cymbals that are closest to the sound you want and maybe throw in something that most people wouldn’t have thought of and let you try them at home. We won’t be sending cymbals that you can readily find at a store. These are cymbals that will expand your voice and, hopefully, match the sound in your head. We’ll figure out the details over the next few days and have it on our site soon.
 

Slingwig26

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2015
Messages
53
Reaction score
20
Location
massachusetts
Hello Community,

I am a new drummer and am looking to learn jazz drumming. I am in the process of piecing together a small kit. I have a 5"x12" snare and 7"x18" bass (TAMA Club-Jam Mini) and just picked up used Sabian HHX 13" Groove Hi-Hats.

I am looking for recommendations for a ride cymbal. Since my drums are small and my hi-hats are small, I was leaning toward a 20" or 21" ride rather than a 22"--I was thinking the 20" or 21" ride might match the volume of the smaller drums and hi-hats.

With jazz in mind, would a Sabian HHX Groove 21" Ride be a good fit? I was reading up that some consider it to be more suitable for funk than jazz. I am also considering a Sabian HHX Legacy 20" Ride. I am trying to spend ~$175 which will likely be hard to find.
An old 19” Paiste Fo602 Medium Ride. Great bell , silvery wash with a pronounced ping on shoulder, and beautiful crashyness.
or.....whatever sounds good to you. Trial and error.
 

Latest posts



Top