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Recordings using less muffled/processed sounds?

Seb77

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We all know countless examples of muffled low snares, as well as high ringy sounds. Any recordings that come to mind using a more open low sound?

I noticed I tend to listen to my drums on their own and often clean up sounds more than necessary using muffling, or eq when recording, while a dirtier drumsound might create a richer texture within the band sound.
More generally, I guess I would like to learn more about how drum sounds work in context, how much rawness, dirt you can get away with. I don't necessarily mean extremely honky or extreme sounds, just with more length/tail and overtones, ideally before compression or reverb.This might include more roomy recordings as well.
I think Jim Keltner has used sounds like that, albums/tracks you would recommend? Any other examples that come to mind, or maybe somehing you recorded yourself that you feel worked well in that respect?
 

Whitten

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Most studio drummers start with a more live snare and tom sound than you would think.
Once you add guitars, walls of keyboards etc any rattle or ring on a drum gets sucked away. If you start with the 'perfect' sounding drum it will sound tiny by the time the record is finished.
I learnt this salutory lesson when working with Jerry Marotta once.
He set up his drums with everything alive, albeit emperor heads on toms. It sounded like a rampant monster in the room. I thought to myself - this sounds awful. But when the record came out it sounded amazing! I learnt my lesson.
 

bellbrass

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Most studio drummers start with a more live snare and tom sound than you would think.
Once you add guitars, walls of keyboards etc any rattle or ring on a drum gets sucked away. If you start with the 'perfect' sounding drum it will sound tiny by the time the record is finished.
I learnt this salutory lesson when working with Jerry Marotta once.
He set up his drums with everything alive, albeit emperor heads on toms. It sounded like a rampant monster in the room. I thought to myself - this sounds awful. But when the record came out it sounded amazing! I learnt my lesson.
I had always wondered if that happened in a "real" studio (state of the art, pro studio). I know it happens live, for sure. I've had brass snares that ring and honk on stage be reduced to thudding dead drums once the sound got into the PA and past the sound guy.
 

Whitten

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It's all about context.
I don't personally like honking, ringing snares. Best thing is to start with a ringing snare drum and back it off with adjustable muffling (moon gel, snare weight, gaffe) working with the producer and engineer as a team.
Resonating drums can really mess up live sound (at a gig), so I tend to dampen more on stage than I do in the studio.

In the studio my toms ring every time I hit the kick and snare. It can get very annoying, so I automate a volume dip and bring them back up when I'm actually playing the toms.
 

Tubwompus

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Most studio drummers start with a more live snare and tom sound than you would think.
Once you add guitars, walls of keyboards etc any rattle or ring on a drum gets sucked away. If you start with the 'perfect' sounding drum it will sound tiny by the time the record is finished.
I learnt this salutory lesson when working with Jerry Marotta once.
He set up his drums with everything alive, albeit emperor heads on toms. It sounded like a rampant monster in the room. I thought to myself - this sounds awful. But when the record came out it sounded amazing! I learnt my lesson.
THIS^^^
 

1988fxlr

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Big low open tom sounds are kind of a hallmark of 90’s alternative and pop punk bands as opposed to the thuddier 80’s sound. Check out Longview by Green Day for a good example.
 
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swayed1

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Sometimes the ringy snare is exactly what is needed. Matt Cameron used a 7" Keplinger pipe snare on several songs on Superunknown and I can't imagine it without the big RING. This album has some of the best drum sounds I've ever heard.

 

Seb77

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Most studio drummers start with a more live snare and tom sound than you would think.
Once you add guitars, walls of keyboards etc any rattle or ring on a drum gets sucked away. If you start with the 'perfect' sounding drum it will sound tiny by the time the record is finished.
That's what I mean. Would be great to hear more examples. Drums only tracks would be great, too.
Not thinking of tracks that end up sounding particularly ringy, detuned or otherwise whacky, just big and rich. Not tiny, as Whitten puts it.
What I don't know is how much eq typically applied to even natural sounding mixes, I suspect quite a lot. I guess what I'm looking for is a less pre eq'ed, pre gated drum sound acoustically, maybe even with quite a bit of processing afterwards.
 

DavedrumsTX

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We all know countless examples of muffled low snares, as well as high ringy sounds. Any recordings that come to mind using a more open low sound?

I noticed I tend to listen to my drums on their own and often clean up sounds more than necessary using muffling, or eq when recording, while a dirtier drumsound might create a richer texture within the band sound.
More generally, I guess I would like to learn more about how drum sounds work in context, how much rawness, dirt you can get away with. I don't necessarily mean extremely honky or extreme sounds, just with more length/tail and overtones, ideally before compression or reverb.This might include more roomy recordings as well.
I think Jim Keltner has used sounds like that, albums/tracks you would recommend? Any other examples that come to mind, or maybe somehing you recorded yourself that you feel worked well in that respect?
When I first started recording in the mid 70s, I made the mistake of trying to replicate the sound of the drums on records in the way that I tune my drums. The more I started to record, the more I started focusing on tuning drums extremely well. Once I learned how to tune drums very well, I found it easier for engineers to get the right sound. Occasionally I will throw a Moongel on something that’s A little hot, but I find tuning, Mic selection, pre amp selection and Mic placement and room sound make a huge difference. Long story short I use very little muffling
 

Tornado

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Sometimes the ringy snare is exactly what is needed. Matt Cameron used a 7" Keplinger pipe snare on several songs on Superunknown and I can't imagine it without the big RING. This album has some of the best drum sounds I've ever heard.


Funny, I was just listening to Fell On Black Days yesterday and really appreciating how natural the drums sounded. Which may not be all that natural when it's all said and done, but they did a great job of letting the end result sound like great drums really sound, IMO.
 

Vicey

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When I was in junior high percussion I remember hating that snare sound. Now I love it.
I've always loved this snare sound. It's the first one I remember consciously trying to recreate through head selection, tuning, and playing.
 

Whitten

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EQ isn't going to make a bad snare sound good, or remove completely a lot of ring or honk. EQ is a sweetener, or slightly corrective. These days a lot of producers will just layer in one or two snare samples to mask a bad snare.
Since the 1990's it's been hard to determine what a natural sound on a record is, with widespread sample enhancement.
 

tnsquint1

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EQ isn't going to make a bad snare sound good, or remove completely a lot of ring or honk. EQ is a sweetener, or slightly corrective. These days a lot of producers will just layer in one or two snare samples to mask a bad snare.
Since the 1990's it's been hard to determine what a natural sound on a record is, with widespread sample enhancement.
That is truth right there!
 


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