Regarding snare issue.

Chinmay147

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Hello everybody. My friend tried to tune my snare fat. So he tightened the resonant head super tightly and followed some dude's instructions on YouTube for the batter head. Few days passed and my place gets dusty, thus same guy told me that he'd open up the snare to clean it from inside. Whilst opening both the heads two tension rods each from too and bottom came out really tight,with some thread wear on both. I didn't understand as I'm new to drumming and this guy teaches me. Afterwards he assembled the snare and now it sounds aweful. Now I sheeet scared as I don't know what is to be done. I live in a remote area so there's no one who knows drumming or anything related to it besides him. I'm having two questions, 1) Is the tension rod or its female part damaged? If yes does it mean that my snare is damaged now ? 2) Can I get the snare to sound good by getting it tuned by some expert ? Please help guys. Also how can I attach a video of the same so that I can show you how does it sound now.
 

Drm1979

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Ok first im not sure if your snare is damaged or not without seeing it, so my first question is do the tensions rods go into the lugs and stay or do they just fall out. If they actually stay in and hold their tuning then you might be ok. Second since your new at this and still learning how to tune your drums I would advise going on YouTube yourself and look up snare tuning tutorial videos. There are tons out there that can show you the basics of how to tune and you can achieve the sound you want. If the lugs, or tension rods are damaged you can go online and order the parts that need to be replaced. Drum factory direct is a great website to use for this. There is also a parts section on drums for sale. Just type either of these into a search and the websites should come up.
 

Chinmay147

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Hello thanks for the speedy response. I didn't do it because I started drumming only few months ago. He's been playing for a long time. The snare has 8 tension rods, 6 on each side go inside smoothly. The other 2 on both sides are a bit hard to screw into initially but when the get inside by a thread or two it's a bit smoother although not as much compared to other six. Secondly how do I check if they're holding the tuning? Should I make a marking on the chrome ring and the tension rod and play for a while and then check if the marking matches or not? Or is there any other way to do it? Also how can I share a video here ,when I try to upload a MP4 it says format not supported. Pls help
 

Seb77

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I've seen brass swivel nuts/receivers lose their threadings through high tension. You'll see some little brass pieces come out, and the t-rod doesn't tighten anymore. If there's a just a resistance against the t-rod, tuning gets more difficult, but as long as you feel the t-rod getting tighter upon turning, it's still ok.
 

Chinmay147

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I've seen brass swivel nuts/receivers lose their threadings through high tension. You'll see some little brass pieces come out, and the t-rod doesn't tighten anymore. If there's a just a resistance against the t-rod, tuning gets more difficult, but as long as you feel the t-rod getting tighter upon turning, it's still ok.
It isn't as tight and I'm facing resistance only for the 2 rods that came out tighter than the rest. I made a marking on the rod and matching marking on the chrome ring and played for like 10 minutes with hard hitting. The rods haven't changed their position as of now. Issue when opened up, the engaging side of the snare wire was in place (since factory) he loosened the other end of the snare wire. Now after assembling, with or without snare wire engaged a lot of humming is heard post striking. Also the snare wire sound is heard along with the humm. It isn't as clean as it used to before. With the snare wire disengaged sometimes I hear a sound like that of the wire partially engaged. This also wasn't the case before. Could it be the problem with how he assembled the whole thing?
 

Rock Salad

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Use a link to youtube or soundcloud or the like to share your recording.
You can get great help here, but also a wide variety of suggestions to choose from.
 

SpinaDude

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As far as damage for your actual drum shell goes, my first question is what kind of drum is it? Metal, or wood? Cheap or expensive? I've heard you can knock a shell out of round or crack the finish by over-tensioning. It's never happened to me, but I've heard it's possible.

Are the snare wired not lined up properly on the head? If they are stretched to the point that they are touching the shell, that can create unwanted hums, tones or ringing.
 

SpinaDude

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Also, I highly recommend these guys for tuning and drum property videos.



 

Chinmay147

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As far as damage for your actual drum shell goes, my first question is what kind of drum is it? Metal, or wood? Cheap or expensive? I've heard you can knock a shell out of round or crack the finish by over-tensioning. It's never happened to me, but I've heard it's possible.

Are the snare wired not lined up properly on the head? If they are stretched to the point that they are touching the shell, that can create unwanted hums, tones or ringing.
It's my first kit. It's Natal Arcadia birch kit. Not so expensive. I got it for like 600$ along with hardware.
 

Chinmay147

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I've seen brass swivel nuts/receivers lose their threadings through high tension. You'll see some little brass pieces come out, and the t-rod doesn't tighten anymore. If there's a just a resistance against the t-rod, tuning gets more difficult, but as long as you feel the t-rod getting tighter upon turning, it's still ok.

That's how bad it sounds
 

Chinmay147

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As far as damage for your actual drum shell goes, my first question is what kind of drum is it? Metal, or wood? Cheap or expensive? I've heard you can knock a shell out of round or crack the finish by over-tensioning. It's never happened to me, but I've heard it's possible.

Are the snare wired not lined up properly on the head? If they are stretched to the point that they are touching the shell, that can create unwanted hums, tones or ringing.

That's how bad it sounds
 

Chinmay147

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Ok first im not sure if your snare is damaged or not without seeing it, so my first question is do the tensions rods go into the lugs and stay or do they just fall out. If they actually stay in and hold their tuning then you might be ok. Second since your new at this and still learning how to tune your drums I would advise going on YouTube yourself and look up snare tuning tutorial videos. There are tons out there that can show you the basics of how to tune and you can achieve the sound you want. If the lugs, or tension rods are damaged you can go online and order the parts that need to be replaced. Drum factory direct is a great website to use for this. There is also a parts section on drums for sale. Just type either of these into a search and the websites should come up.
 

Vicey

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SpinaDude's recommendations are solid. From your description of your problem, the person who tuned your drum may have used a non-standard tuning protocol, of which there are several roaming the internet these days. By non-standard, I mean a systematic uneven tensioning of the rods, perhaps leaving some rods practically de-tuned while the opposite lug is cranked up to compensate. This would explain why you're having problems with two lugs.

I'd suggest detuning everything and starting over, resonant head first. Try to get all of your tension rods even by judging the pitch at each point (as the videos will show). Start with fairly high tension on the resonant head and a bit lower on the batter head. You can experiment from there to see what works with your taste and your drum.

I have tried several non-standard, uneven snare drum tunings on my snares, and I've always gone back to even tuning. Especially with an eight-lug snare, even tensioning is certainly something that you want to learn first before messing around with other stuff. And, as I hope you haven't just experienced, radically uneven tunings can damage your drum.
 

Chinmay147

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SpinaDude's recommendations are solid. From your description of your problem, the person who tuned your drum may have used a non-standard tuning protocol, of which there are several roaming the internet these days. By non-standard, I mean a systematic uneven tensioning of the rods, perhaps leaving some rods practically de-tuned while the opposite lug is cranked up to compensate. This would explain why you're having problems with two lugs.

I'd suggest detuning everything and starting over, resonant head first. Try to get all of your tension rods even by judging the pitch at each point (as the videos will show). Start with fairly high tension on the resonant head and a bit lower on the batter head. You can experiment from there to see what works with your taste and your drum.

I have tried several non-standard, uneven snare drum tunings on my snares, and I've always gone back to even tuning. Especially with an eight-lug snare, even tensioning is certainly something that you want to learn first before messing around with other stuff. And, as I hope you haven't just experienced, radically uneven tunings can damage your drum.
Thanks for your help. I'm just a beginner so don't know much about it. See this is how bad it sounds.

 

SpinaDude

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SpinaDude's recommendations are solid. From your description of your problem, the person who tuned your drum may have used a non-standard tuning protocol, of which there are several roaming the internet these days. By non-standard, I mean a systematic uneven tensioning of the rods, perhaps leaving some rods practically de-tuned while the opposite lug is cranked up to compensate. This would explain why you're having problems with two lugs.

I'd suggest detuning everything and starting over, resonant head first. Try to get all of your tension rods even by judging the pitch at each point (as the videos will show). Start with fairly high tension on the resonant head and a bit lower on the batter head. You can experiment from there to see what works with your taste and your drum.

I have tried several non-standard, uneven snare drum tunings on my snares, and I've always gone back to even tuning. Especially with an eight-lug snare, even tensioning is certainly something that you want to learn first before messing around with other stuff. And, as I hope you haven't just experienced, radically uneven tunings can damage your drum.
Yes. Take it down to the bones. Take the snared off completely. Take both heads off. Check your bearing edges. Are they smooth and even? No chunks taken out? If you're good there, you should be able to get a descent sound out of it.

Seat the snare side head. Does it sit smooth and even without having to wedge it on? If so, that's great. Unlikely the shell is warped or out of round...unless the shell us undersize, but I wouldn't go there yet. Once you get the snare side even, put the snares on and keep them even too. remember to compensate as you tighten the strainer and engage the wires. This can require fine tweaking back and forth. Again, make sure the metal ends that touch the snare wire are not resting on the bearing edge. Then work on the batter side. Again for for even. Get to a medium tuning then you can work your way back to a fat snare sound.

Keep in mind, these are very basic instructions. Any of the videos I posted above give you much more depth.

I wouldn't worry about a rod or two having tight threads. Sometimes you just need to break it in.

In the end, if you're still getting a lot of unwanted ring or overtones, these can help a lot.

Or this... https://www.sweetwater.com/store/de...nare-drum-auto-tone-snare-drum-topper-14-inch (This one is kind of a major cheat, but it helps until you get it dialed in, and will at least kill initial frustrations.)

Let us know if any of this helps. Sorry your videos are not posting.
 

Rock Salad

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Everything is too loose, at least the batter and wires are. Go slow as possible and take it up bit by bit. Think nice, tight timbale sound on the snare side. Watch some youtube if you are unsure about pitches in tune (with each other) or not.
Then the batter, which is more personal preference than the others. Last the wires, loose them all the way off the head and hear the thump of your drum. Then bring them back on till the thump goes away, then back it off to let the thump back in to taste.
I'm not sure I would remove the snare side head as it has been cranked on there and may not seat again if removed.

p.s. you can do this! it is confusing and frustrating but rewarding in the end
 

Chinmay147

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Everything is too loose, at least the batter and wires are. Go slow as possible and take it up bit by bit. Think nice, tight timbale sound on the snare side. Watch some youtube if you are unsure about pitches in tune (with each other) or not.
Then the batter, which is more personal preference than the others. Last the wires, loose them all the way off the head and hear the thump of your drum. Then bring them back on till the thump goes away, then back it off to let the thump back in to taste.
I'm not sure I would remove the snare side head as it has been cranked on there and may not seat again if removed.
Thanks for your help. The resonant side bearing edges are uneven since factory. I bought thsi kit only 4 months ago in a brand new condition. The resonant side bearing edges are 45 degrees on some portions, flat on others. But when the kit was delivered the snare sounded pretty nice. This happened after the f*** up. Did you watch the video? I shared in the thread above
 

Rock Salad

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I did. Maybe don't take that head off since you have already inspected it. Snare side will have different surfaces because of the snare beds.
Try bringing the batter head up some, then the wires. Play with it, see what things do.
 

SpinaDude

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I just saw the video. I agree with Rock Salad about everything being too loose. I would still strip it down, but I get crazy with stuff like that, so take my advice as far as that goes with a pinch of salt and stick with your comfort level.

One other thing to note...you have UT Remo heads on there. These are cheaper heads than what you get in the US and often used by manufacturers on entry level and intermediate kits. In my experience, they are flat and dead sounding. So keep that in mind when bringing it up to tune.
 


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