Reinforcement Ring Separation on old drums Question

jazzdrummer62

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I'm looking for some advice regarding minor reinforcement ring separation from the shell on drums from the 50's and how much of a concern it should be. Also, can it be repaired and if so, or could it be better to leave as is. Any input would be appreciated. Thank You
 

CaptainCrunch

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Could you provide pics? If it's as straightforward as you describe, it should be straightforward to fix. And it should be addressed, if possible. Rerings are structural components, and their job is to keep the body of the shell from turning back into the flat ply board it once was.
 

EvEnStEvEn

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Pics of the separation gaps might help, but what I've done with old mahogany Slingerlands or Leedys is simply point the tip of a wood glue dispenser bottle right up against the rering inside the shell and follow it all the way around while gently squeezing the glue out, forcing it into the gaps in a uniform bead and wiping any excess. Of course that's the easy way to bond slight gaps. More serious separation could require removing the rings entirely to glue & re-install. I've never done that yet.
 

clowndog

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You should definitely address that. Wood appears to have dried out and shrank at some point by looking at the joint along with the separation.
 

jazzdrummer62

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Can anyone offer some guidance on how one would go about fixing ie. are there special clamps and a particular type of glue etc... Simple home fix or better to have a professional handle and does the repair effect the value of a vintage drum from the 50's ? Some times old things are better off being left alone??

If left alone and would one expect the separation to continue and get worse over time?

Thank You
 

sptucker

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I'm not a pro drum restorer, but I have done some furniture building and have rebuilt a few old kits over the years, so take this with a grain of salt...

What I do is use a very thin metal spatula to work Elmer's Wood Glue or Titebond into the separation cracks. Clamp with C-clamps tightly enough that the separation closes, using soft pine pieces between the clamp and the drum to prevent marring the drum. Wipe away any excess glue with a wet cloth or paper towel. Let it set overnight.

For me, this fix leaves no trace and has so far been permanent.

If left alone, I would not expect it to get any better over time, but it may not get any worse.
 

thejohnlec

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I did a very minor re ring repair with clamps and Titebond wood glue as stated above, and the bond was very strong.
 

CaptainCrunch

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Can anyone offer some guidance on how one would go about fixing ie. are there special clamps and a particular type of glue etc... Simple home fix or better to have a professional handle and does the repair effect the value of a vintage drum from the 50's ? Some times old things are better off being left alone??

If left alone and would one expect the separation to continue and get worse over time?

Thank You
I'm a big fan of Titebond II - it can also be thinned a little bit if that gets it further into a gap. I've used syringes, popsicle sticks, orphaned feeler gauges, whatever will fit into the crack to work in glue, then clamp (I use the giant clothespin type with rubber on the jaws, unless it needs some real force, then I'll use a bar clamp), wipe with the damp cloth, and give it a couple days. I think it says 24 hours, but I'm not one for rushing.

A repair that's clean doesn't detract from a drum's value, but generally a needed repair does.
 

gwbasley

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I'm not a pro drum restorer, but I have done some furniture building and have rebuilt a few old kits over the years, so take this with a grain of salt...

What I do is use a very thin metal spatula to work Elmer's Wood Glue or Titebond into the separation cracks. Clamp with C-clamps tightly enough that the separation closes, using soft pine pieces between the clamp and the drum to prevent marring the drum. Wipe away any excess glue with a wet cloth or paper towel. Let it set overnight.

For me, this fix leaves no trace and has so far been permanent.

If left alone, I would not expect it to get any better over time, but it may not get any worse.
I agree with you except that I would use many evenly distributed spring clamps to avoid creating "waves" in the edge after the glue sets up. The spring clamps will allow the parts to settle evenly.

Also run painter's tape under the ring to contain any runs.
 

sptucker

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I agree with you except that I would use many evenly distributed spring clamps to avoid creating "waves" in the edge after the glue sets up. The spring clamps will allow the parts to settle evenly.

Also run painter's tape under the ring to contain any runs.
There are many ways to do the clamping, all equally valid. I've been very happy with my results. As long as you place them strategically and close all the gaps, I'm not sure it matters what clamps you use. Sometimes even one is enough...

Painters tape is great for so many things!
 

SwivoNut

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I have made a number of re-ring repairs and in all cases some wood from the ring had to be removed in order for it to fit back together properly. I used a small wood file similar to a fingernail file to take down both edges of the ring. Once I was satisfied that the ring would fit properly, i glued each end with contact cement. After waiting the recommended time period, I put the ends together and secured them with c-clamps overnight. Voila - just like new.
 

Pounder

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I have repaired a re-ring and in my case it was almost completely separated. I put Elmer's wood glue between the separation, and then clamped it till dry, promptly wiping away the excess with a damp cloth. If you're concerned about the circular shell shape, you could place a rounded pieces on either side of the clamp before clamping. Additional care should be made that you simply clamp the glued parts, but without compressing this porous dry wood on either the plies of the shell or the re-ring. It should improve the sound of the drum. Those old (Slingerland?) shells sound-wise are the bee's knees! Good luck!
 

JazzDrumGuy

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No biggie there. Get a small flat screwdriver, pry it up a bit, put some wood glue in there, and clamp down. If you still have the ridges, use some wood filler....done.
 

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