Repairing a Crack Myself?

Sinclair

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This must have been covered already but I'll go ahead and post anyway.

I've come across a really nice 20" Trans Stamp in the 1800 gram range with the unmistakable TS sheen. It's gorgeous.
It also has a not so gorgeous crack from a factory rivet hole that runs along a lath line in a few directions. (see pictures)
Fortunately I think it's close enough to the edge that it should be easy to notch out entirely, solving the problem while loosing one of the eight rivets in the process.

I think this will actually free up the cymbal to vibrate more as the crack seems to be stunting the sustain some. A notch about the size of half a 50 cent piece (google it kids) will surly add to the character, sound and vibe of the cymbal, thereby acting as a chick magnet (Taylor Hawkins told me they can't resist a cracked out ride cymbal) during set breaks at sleazy bars I frequent that may never materialize again due to the lockdown. I was so close to scoring too. Damn Covid19. I would have settles for a Covid22 or even28. OK a divorced Covid35 ..with 2 kids, come on! why even play the drums?!

Anyway my question is what tool do I need to cut the notch out, or should I just take it to Pro Drum or Heather Stein?
Thanks in advance.
 

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JDA

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or Jake The Fuser- it's fusion (not welding -he doesn't 'add' anything- he fuses back together-what it- already there)
Jake Winebrenner
but it's trip sending it back and forth but all good reports and I think those cracks are ...Right up his Alley
 
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AustinFitz

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I used a dremel tool with a small cutting disc, and a little round grinding stone bit on these 2 "repairs". In my opinion they came out great! The little 12" splash did eventually crack again which I expected, but the 16" Paper Thin Crash has held up great! It's been played daily for a couple of years now, and sounds surprisingly nice!

Here's a terrible "before" picture. Only one I have.
Screenshot_2020-06-20-22-41-12(1)-01.jpeg


And then after a little cutting, grinding, and filing.
0531181642_HDR.jpg


0531181229a_HDR.jpg


0531181230_HDR.jpg
 

JDA

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Yea shipping the cymbal out pia <-80$-> both ways
Because he could do that; doesn't have to be in the center'
Could also have the cracks dremel out; would barely notice it was repaired instead
 

Elvis

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This must have been covered already but I'll go ahead and post anyway.

I've come across a really nice 20" Trans Stamp in the 1800 gram range with the unmistakable TS sheen. It's gorgeous.
It also has a not so gorgeous crack from a factory rivet hole that runs along a lath line in a few directions. (see pictures)
Fortunately I think it's close enough to the edge that it should be easy to notch out entirely, solving the problem while loosing one of the eight rivets in the process.

I think this will actually free up the cymbal to vibrate more as the crack seems to be stunting the sustain some. A notch about the size of half a 50 cent piece (google it kids) will surly add to the character, sound and vibe of the cymbal, thereby acting as a chick magnet (Taylor Hawkins told me they can't resist a cracked out ride cymbal) during set breaks at sleazy bars I frequent that may never materialize again due to the lockdown. I was so close to scoring too. Damn Covid19. I would have settles for a Covid22 or even28. OK a divorced Covid35 ..with 2 kids, come on! why even play the drums?!

Anyway my question is what tool do I need to cut the notch out, or should I just take it to Pro Drum or Heather Stein?
Thanks in advance.
Welcome to the wonderful world of Metal Working! :hello2: (how do we not have the dancing banana? Everyone has the dancing banana!)
Ideally, I'd take a Plasma Cutter to it (I know, sounds scary, but its actually a lot of fun and easy to use), but ALL of this really depends on how "handy" you are.
Still figuring out how to change that pesky light bulb that no longer works?....then take this cymbal to Heather Stein.
You've recently built yourself a new deck, repleat with a nice roof to cover you from the hot sun while you sip on a Bud pondering siding options for the garage upgrade you're about to tackle?....go ahead and fix the cymbal.

A powered coping saw with a metal blade (or one of those "cuts all" blade...what we used to call a "Remington Rod Saw", once upon a time)...or possibly a band saw with a metal blade, will get you the basic shape.
A drill press will help you with the corners.
Finally, a Dremel with a sander to change the sharp edges and corners into nice round radius's, to keep this from happening again.
Also, a pair of scissors, a pen and a piece of paper, to trace your cut line on, then cut it out of the paper, lay the paper over the area you want to cut out, and transfer the shape to the cymbal with a felt pen.

SO, the first thing you need to figure out is if you're capable of doing this in the first place....your biggest hint will the apprehension you feel about doing the project yourself.
If its enough to have you second guessing yourself, then just give it to a 'smith and let them do the job the right way, the first time.

Elvis
 
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Sinclair

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Thanks for the detailed response Elvis. Very helpful. I dont own any of those tools so I've got some thinking to do.
 
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Jordan Blue

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Ok, I'll just say it. IMO, there really is no such thing as 'repairing' a cracked cymbal. Yes, you can do whatever or cut whatever out to make the cymbal 'playable' (if that's what you want to call it). But it will never ever sound the same before you cracked it. Yes, I realize there will be probably be hundreds of you who'll disagree with me.
 
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I would try to drill two or three holes at the end of the cracks as a first try. Finding the true end involves some guesswork, having a good light source and moving the cymbal below it. What looks like the end of the crack at a first glance might be a few millimeters before the actual end. I've had a similar crack once and the cymbal was pretty dead. After drilling, the metal from both sides of the crack no longer rubbed against each other and the cymbal was back to more or less normal sounding. Especially with rivets, you might not notice a difference when playing it.
If that doesn't give you the desired result, you can still cut out a part of the cymbal later.
 

"poppies"

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Ok, I'll just say it. IMO, there really is no such thing as 'repairing' a cracked cymbal. Yes, you can do whatever or cut whatever out to make the cymbal 'playable' (if that's what you want to call it). But it will never ever sound the same before you cracked it. Yes, I realize there will be probably be hundreds of you who'll disagree with me.
It's true, one can't "repair" a cymbal in the sense of getting back to the original sound, but a repair can make a cymbal sustainably playable. Additionally, almost every single notched-out cymbal I've played has sounded great; the notch seems to add subtle frequency dissonances that add nice character.
 

Drumbumcrumb

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I’d try to just drill out the crack-ends. Failing that, a Dremel will get you where you need to go. Sounds like you can do all the surgery from the edge?
 

JDA

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from the rivet hole- Three little openings..removing the cracks...preserve-ing the integrity of the edge..TPC can do it..
It'll be considered air-conditioned hotel-motel LA Sunset-Strip style.
shorted-out neon vacancy sign flicker...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


"Strictly Commercial...."
 
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Sinclair

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Yes...Happy Fathers Day to all you guys with....ummm with....with...KIDS yeah that's what they're called...right! I have one myself...he's around here somewhere...what honey? he moved out last year...oh ok.

I'm already in consortium with Heather Stein about this. She's a full grown woman but I still trust her.
BTW I'd like to apologize for my earlier poor taste pandemic sexist humor about women and Covid. I know how sensitive you ladies can get about that sheeet.

Thanks again for all your input. Especially joe who can't remember if he's even a Dad or not. Keep ya posted.
 
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Sinclair

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Update:
Picked up the TS from Heather Stein today. 34 grams lighter. She saved the cut out and the original rivet for me which will be in the for sale section tomorrow for $95. She did an absolutely stellar job and her fee was beyond reasonable.
She told me she's starting back up working from blanks and has quite a few orders for new cymbals. She's also doing mods which not everybody does.
Here's some pictures for you guys that don't read too good.
 

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