Repairing die cast hoops

mark2456

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I have a Yamaha maple custom absolute 10” tom. I believe that the die cast hoops are made from aluminum. The bottom hoop won’t lay flat. Are die cast hoops like these repairable? If so has anyone had experience on how?
 

DrFrankCoco

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I have a Yamaha maple custom absolute 10” tom. I believe that the die cast hoops are made from aluminum. The bottom hoop won’t lay flat. Are die cast hoops like these repairable? If so has anyone had experience on how?
I have a 50' ludwig snare with nob hoops. Brass is soft. I'd like to do the same adjustment. Clamps, hammers and a machinist stone perfectly flat surface seems to be the way to go. I have asked people who work with metal and havnt found a answer. Aluminum is relatively malleable. Metal has "memory", always wants to go back to where is was. Lmk.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Get a rubber mallet and put something underneath the rim and start tapping. I've done it with regular Hoops, not diecast, but the same principle.
 

1988fxlr

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I would try bolting it to a board with the lug holes at the low points screwed to a piece of scrap wood and the high points floating free. Then tighten the bolts at the high lug holes incrementally until a straight edge sits flush. It might spring back a bit and need another round on the board but the important thing is to bend it slowly. If you shock it, you will crack it
 

Tommy D

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I would try bolting it to a board with the lug holes at the low points screwed to a piece of scrap wood and the high points floating free. Then tighten the bolts at the high lug holes incrementally until a straight edge sits flush. It might spring back a bit and need another round on the board but the important thing is to bend it slowly. If you shock it, you will crack it
I was going to suggest this method as well.
 

1988fxlr

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I was going to suggest this method as well.
I’ve never tried it on a hoop, but I’ve watched it done to straighten out a warped cast rocker cover for a harley. Worked fine
 
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ThomasL

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At least with out-of-round cast zinc hoops, you definitely have to compress them past round. Have never tried it with aluminum, though. Take it a little at a time.
 

DBT

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I would try bolting it to a board with the lug holes at the low points screwed to a piece of scrap wood and the high points floating free. Then tighten the bolts at the high lug holes incrementally until a straight edge sits flush. It might spring back a bit and need another round on the board but the important thing is to bend it slowly. If you shock it, you will crack it
I’m going to try it . Both my 12” hoops are in round and the chrome is in really good condition but they aren’t sitting flat on granite . Not bad but I suspect it’s because they were torqued down tight to the bearing edges that weren’t true and sitting in that attic all those years . I’ll let you know how it works out .
 


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