Resting your right leg between kick drum hits

Hypercaffium

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Hi,
I'm transitioning from heel down only to heel up and I've noticed that when I play heel up I can't rest my right leg between hits unless I bury the beater, which allows me to unload the weight of the leg. I'd like to learn how to do that without burying the beater all the time. I've tried to rest my right leg putting my heel back down between hits and it's definitely doable, but still a little bit tiring. Suggestions?
 

Matched Gripper

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Hi,
I'm transitioning from heel down only to heel up and I've noticed that when I play heel up I can't rest my right leg between hits unless I bury the beater, which allows me to unload the weight of the leg. I'd like to learn how to do that without burying the beater all the time. I've tried to rest my right leg putting my heel back down between hits and it's definitely doable, but still a little bit tiring. Suggestions?
Try playing with the ball of your foot about 1/3 down the pedal board from the toe stop, hold your heel low, about an inch off of the pedal board (that should help you not bury the beater), play by pivoting from the ankle rather than lifting your whole leg, and rest your heel on the pedal board when not playing.
 

Seb77

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Even with lifting your knee, which imo you need for higher volume, you can let the the beater bounce after the stroke and rest the heel. The calf muscles can be tense for the impact and then relax.
 

Hypercaffium

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Try playing with the ball of your foot about 1/3 down the pedal board from the toe stop, hold your heel low, about an inch off of the pedal board (that should help you not bury the beater), play by pivoting from the ankle rather than lifting your whole leg, and rest your heel on the pedal board when not playing.
Ok, so you're basically suggesting to:
- use the heel zone of the pedal? I'm not sure about "1/3 down the pedal board from the toe stop", I'm sorry. I usually put the ball of my foot in the middle part of the pedal.
- keep the heel low, so it doesn't need to travel that far to rest on the pedal when not playing.
- use the ankle instead of the whole leg (unless it's necessary for more volume).
thanks.

Even with lifting your knee, which imo you need for higher volume, you can let the the beater bounce after the stroke and rest the heel. The calf muscles can be tense for the impact and then relax.
Thanks.
I've tried to play thinking about this and I've found myself playing in the heel down position, but right before each note I rise the heel just a little bit and use the ankle, after that I rest the heel on the pedal. It seeems to work, it's not very natural yet but it's definitely doable.
Thanks.
 

Matched Gripper

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Ok, so you're basically suggesting to:
- use the heel zone of the pedal? I'm not sure about "1/3 down the pedal board from the toe stop", I'm sorry. I usually put the ball of my foot in the middle part of the pedal.
- keep the heel low, so it doesn't need to travel that far to rest on the pedal when not playing.
- use the ankle instead of the whole leg (unless it's necessary for more volume).
thanks.


Thanks.
I've tried to play thinking about this and I've found myself playing in the heel down position, but right before each note I rise the heel just a little bit and use the ankle, after that I rest the heel on the pedal. It seeems to work, it's not very natural yet but it's definitely doable.
Thanks.
Keeping the heel low will also help the beater rebound off the head.
 

Hop

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Try playing with the ball of your foot about 1/3 down the pedal board from the toe stop, hold your heel low, about an inch off of the pedal board (that should help you not bury the beater), play by pivoting from the ankle rather than lifting your whole leg, and rest your heel on the pedal board when not playing.
+1 on this advice.
 

Hypercaffium

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It's working, thanks.
I needed to raise the angle of the plate of my Iron Cobra and move the beater a little over 45° angle in order to have better control.
 

Hypercaffium

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This is a move that's rarely mentioned. Did the same to my JoJo Pedal (a combination of changing spring angle as well as beater angle) and it feels more powerful.
Happy to hear that. I'm a beginner, I just tried to understand what felt "wrong" and used common sense to find a solution.
I was playing with the beater angle set around 30° because I don't need too much power and I like how the shorter movement and almost flat surface of the plate allows quick and easy playing, especially when doing double strokes. The problem with this setup is that I don't have very good control of the pedal when playing with heel up AND not burying the beater. The shorter movement of the beater plus the plate angle makes the pedal not very reactive in terms of rebound, even with medium/high spring tension, at least in my experience. Different spring tensions are not very noticeable until you set the beater around 45° angle. At that point you can clearly feel the difference when playing with spring tension, because the wider movement allows the spring to work better. I must say I didn't touch the spring after rising the beater angle. It wasn't needed because just rising the beater angle added a lot of tension by itself.
I'm sure you can find good balance also working on the kick drum head tension and other factors, but like I said I'm a beginner and I'm doing my best to understand how this works.
With this new setting I can actually feel more tension under my right foot, the rebound seems better but the pedal is harder to play. I have more control especially when playing at low volume but I must say I can't do quick double strokes no more. I must re-learn how to do that I guess.
 

Seb77

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Different spring tensions are not very noticeable until you set the beater around 45° angle. At that point you can clearly feel the difference when playing with spring tension, because the wider movement allows the spring to work better.
I'd say that's because the tension increases exponentially. The spring itself should be more or less linear, but the pull from the spring lever, or whatever it is called, increases.
 

Hypercaffium

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Thanks, that's a good explaination. I'll do some other tests in the next days in order to find a good balance between power and control.
 

Pat A Flafla

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This is a move that's rarely mentioned. Did the same to my JoJo Pedal (a combination of changing spring angle as well as beater angle) and it feels more powerful.
When I was learning on an already ancient Rogers pedal, that was the adjustment that made the most difference and facilitated better doubles and triples.
 

cruddola

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Hi,
I'm transitioning from heel down only to heel up and I've noticed that when I play heel up I can't rest my right leg between hits unless I bury the beater, which allows me to unload the weight of the leg. I'd like to learn how to do that without burying the beater all the time. I've tried to rest my right leg putting my heel back down between hits and it's definitely doable, but still a little bit tiring. Suggestions?
Consider your posture and what ever is your throne. Being on that same boat over forty years ago I went to a large diameter dentist's stool. The seat pad extends almost to the back of my knees. I'm completely balanced on the back of the thighs and not the butt-cheeks. I can take my feet off the pedals without keeling forward. My feet pretty much float above the pedals and I sit much higher. I still maintain great dynamic control. I'm about 6 foot tall. My snare's top rim is about 3 to 4 inches above my lap. My rimshots are like gunshots! None of that Phil Collins low-rider crapper posture for me. Took me very little time to get accustomed to the change. I have no problem doing 6-hour practice sessions at the age of 66.
 

Hypercaffium

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Hi,
thanks for your reply.
I suffer from L5-S1 herniated disc, it doesn't give me problems because I train 3/4 times a week (calisthenics) and keep myself in shape, but when I play drums it can be problem. Due to my back problems, I guess I've set my throne just above 90° angle and started playing heel down only, which is definitely easier on the back.
After switching to heel up I needed to do everything from scratch, basically. I've found a setting that allows me to play both heel up and heel down without hurting my back. I'm still getting used to it but it's working.
I didn't touch my kit, but I rised the throne quite a bit, as well as I rised both beater angle and spring tension. The pedal is not hard to press but it's reactive enough for heel toe and other techniques, plus I can rest the ball of my foot on the pedal without having to rest on my heel (which I still do when needed).
I can now play almost everything but double strokes are still hard and inconsistent using both heel toe and slide.
 


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