Ride cymbal placement

Rmgreg

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I recently got a Roland TD-30 and noticed the ride cymbal was in the middle between the 2 crash cymbals. I know this is all personal preference but I though the ride was generally to the right on a 3 cymbal setup. I'm relatively new to drum sets (not drums) so I don't have a preference yet. I'd prefer to start with the most common setup. I went to my first acoustic lesson and sure enough the ride was to the right. I assumed the previous owner moved the ride but the manual shows it in the middle. Any idea why this would be? Pluses/minuses?
 

bpaluzzi

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It depends on the style of music you're playing, your tom setup, and a number of other things. Many (probably most) players I've seen (outside of metal) bring the ride in tighter, as it's going to be used more than crashes.
 

Elvis

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Whenever I did a 3 cymbal setup, I would put the ride between the crashes, but biased to the left (I'm left footed).
One crash is between the rack tom and the hats, the other crash sits just outside of the ride, placed above the ride.
I generally use a lighter and smaller crash in that position, because I'm looking for a quick accent when playing the ride.
I prefer it not to mix with the sound of the ride for too long.
The other crash would be larger and heavier, so as to give me a longer and bolder accent.

Elvis
 

Elvis

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Yes, that's basically like how I setup.
If it doesn't work for you, set them up however you like.
Nice thing about a drum kit, because its made up of individual pieces, you can set it up however you like.
...btw, forgot to address your question....there is a style of playing known as "open handed" where the arms don't cross. It places the ride on the opposite side....maybe this is what you noticed?
Carter Beauford is probably still the most famous guy who plays open handed.
That's a nice little kit. :thumbup:



Elvis
 
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Rmgreg

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Yes, that's basically like how I setup.
If it doesn't work for you, set them up however you like.
Nice thing about a drum kit, because its made up of individual pieces, you can set it up however you like.
...btw, forgot to address your question....there is a style of playing known as "open handed" where the arms don't cross. It places the ride on the opposite side....maybe this is what you noticed?
That's a nice little kit. :thumbup:

Elvis
So in my pic Roland has the ride in the middle. That's how you do yours? At my lesson on a similarly equipped acoustic set the ride was to the right and the instructor acted like that's the norm
 

Elvis

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Yes, when I do a ride and 2 crashes, I setup like your Roland picture.
I think most people setup like that. Probably why your instruction manual mentioned that.
Its kind of a natural progression.
Are the hi-hats on the kit you use at your lesson on the same side as seen in your Roland picture?

Elvis
 

Rmgreg

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Yes, when I do a ride and 2 crashes, I setup like your Roland picture.
I think most people setup like that. Probably why your instruction manual mentioned that.
Its kind of a natural progression.
Are the hi-hats on the kit you use at your lesson on the same side as seen in your Roland picture?

Elvis
Yes. Hi hat to left l, 2 toms and floor Tom, crash to left crash in middle and ride to eight on the acoustic set at lessons
 

Elvis

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Yep, ok.
Some people prefer the ride all the way to the right, because it allows them to mount the cymbal in a more comfortable position.
There's no wrong or right way to setup a drum kit.
Whatever works best for you....and since you're fairly new to this, I would suggest trying things a number of different setups and see which one you like best.
Be creative! :thumbup:
Good luck.

Elvis
 

Drm1979

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On my 4 piece acoustic I put my ride between the rack and floor tom. Then one crash just to the right of it. My other crash is situated just above my rack tom between it and the hi hat. I haven't quite got it figured out on my ekit because if I move the stand out of its position inside the drum rack it bounces too much and double triggers. The drum rack on my ekit helps hold the stand more rigid and stops it from double triggering. But like the others have said in this thread try different variations and figure out what works best for you.
 

flurbs

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So in my pic Roland has the ride in the middle. That's how you do yours? At my lesson on a similarly equipped acoustic set the ride was to the right and the instructor acted like that's the norm
It's not the norm. It's the norm _for him_. It's his kit, why would he act like something was out of place?

Try yours in between. Then swap the ride and ride crash positions. You'll naturally prefer one over the other, and then THAT is the right setup _for you_.

(You're over-analysing this...)
 

Rmgreg

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It's not the norm. It's the norm _for him_. It's his kit, why would he act like something was out of place?

Try yours in between. Then swap the ride and ride crash positions. You'll naturally prefer one over the other, and then THAT is the right setup _for you_.

(You're over-analysing this...)
Gotcha! I like it where it is, but I did lower and flatten it more like his. The far right cymbal is a stretch and as often as ride is used I want it closer.
 

Whitten

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There is no norm. The only norm is to place your most played kit pieces in comfortable positions.
If I sit on my drum chair, the snare is between my legs, centred - the hi-hat slightly to my left, the ride slightly to my right. With two 'mounted' toms, the ride might have to slide further to the right to make room for tom 2.
 

richardh253

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never happier then when I took the 2d rack tom down, went back to a 4-piece and put the K 20 flat top ride back on a shell-mount L-arm where it belonged. I keep my "Left Hand" 3 rivet Zildjian on a stand to the right of it, same height and angle, over the floor tom, with crash # 2 sticking up in between. I like everything pulled in tight & close like Max Weinberg. (I know I said 4-piece, I had just added the 14x14 last year and keep the 16x16 stored away)

IMG_0269.jpg
IMG_0271.jpg
 
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poco rit.

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When i started playing, i would just mock the cymbal set up that my favorite drummer at the time set theirs up. Once you start figuring out your own sound and style, you can place cymbals wherever is best conducive to pulling off the stuff you want to play.

Fun fact tho: bass drums used to have a cymbal mount on the right side of the bass drum. That was the norm. But the norm was also a one up one down tom configuration.

My first drum teacher had a two up one down kit, and he put the ride at about 2 oclock above the 2nd tom. For that work, the ride has to be situated a little higher and slanted pretty significantly.
 


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