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Ride wash

bonefamily

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More of a general question - would a smaller diameter ride cymbal of the same make/model have less wash than that of a larger diameter? Lets say a 20" vs. 22/24" of the same make. I'm thinking larger/heavier has more moving mass so more wash? It's very likely I'm thinking wrong. (of course we know that the same size will also still vary in weight from one to another, but would be relatively close.)
 

Seb77

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I found that with larger rides, when you play louder, the wash stays more in control. Decay would be longer, though. Lower pitched, too, which might make them appear softer. A 20" will develop more wash when hit harder, at a higher pitch, so it might seem louder.
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

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Of course, much of this will depend on factors such as weight, lathing style, and general shape. But I find that (all else equal), the bigger diameter tends to have more sustain. Just think of the physics of it. When a big cymbal gets going, there’s just more bronze to resonate. Still it comes down the specific cymbal, and remember there are always to tame a cymbal down with tape.
 

1988fxlr

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Larger and heavier has the potential for more wash if struck hard enough, but smaller and thinner will make more wash for a given velocity. A light tap on a thin 12” will bring out the wash of that cymbal, whereas a light hit on a heavy 24” will just make a clean stick sound because you aren’t hitting it hard enough to make it vibrate fully.

In general thin equals wash to me, size has less to do with it. Riding on a thin crash cymbal will give you all wash, whereas heavy rides will give all stick unless you get them moving
 

TMDRUMS

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More of a general question - would a smaller diameter ride cymbal of the same make/model have less wash than that of a larger diameter? Lets say a 20" vs. 22/24" of the same make. I'm thinking larger/heavier has more moving mass so more wash? It's very likely I'm thinking wrong. (of course we know that the same size will also still vary in weight from one to another, but would be relatively close.)
For me, I believe the more "wash" a ride cymbal produces is not only based on diameter of cymbal but weight (thickness) as well. Thinner and larger diameter rides IMOP produce a ton of wash.
 

Thumper

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For me, I believe the more "wash" a ride cymbal produces is not only based on diameter of cymbal but weight (thickness) as well. Thinner and larger diameter rides IMOP produce a ton of wash.

Agree; part of the reason I never use my 22" K light.
 

jtpaistegeist

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Generally yes. Although the profile, hammering, lathing, etc have much to do with the feel and dryness. For example, I have Turk style unlathed thin cymbals that have more stick definition than some heavier, larger models.

I can definitely play quicker/cleaner/clearer patterns with a 22" standard light jazz ride ~2400g, than the 20" ~1900g counterpart. There can be a point of diminishing returns though.. a 26" paper thin can get lost, as some VERY dark rides, such as a 22" at 1800g. (just my personal experience)
 

bonefamily

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Thanks for the replies - understood. Certainly physics plays a strong role. Get the larger/heavier mass moving and wants to keep going, while smaller/lighter mass might have more wash will decay quicker - one suited better for quicker riding patterns and one more suited for more intermittent patterns.
 


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