Right side ride?.

wayne

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Growing up a ride cymbal was a ride, and you put it where you wanted it. What is the reason some refer to rides as left or right side?...don't get it.
 

Seb77

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There's a tradition with bebop and post-bop drummers to use two crash rides. Oftentimes the right one is more of a ride, and the left is a (slightly) more of a crash. The latter often goes on the left for some reason. You're right, it could be the other way round as well, didn't Ringo use a setup like that?
 

JDA

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some refer to rides as left or right side?...don't get it.
better or another, word for the left would be alternate.
You're having two "shade" of "ride" to use at differing times throughout a tune.

Or you can use or 'be' the Tony/Buddy (minus the swish) and others approach of majority one-ride throughout
~~~
It's a harmonic thing you may want the option to shade the sub-tonic harmonic section of a tune with a lighter ride then back when the tune reverts back to the tonic. It's ride cymbals following complimenting the chord structures and the harmonic structure of the song. It's a vision of accompanying. In the case of some drummers not needed or wanted.
 
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Bongo Brad

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Right side would be the main ride spot for most drummers. Left side ride is the alternative voice.
 

multijd

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Theres a different physical sensation playing to the right or to the left. I want a cymbal that compliments how I move on that side of my body. First and foremost is hearing what you want. If you can hear it you can play it.
 

wayne

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Appreciate the imput a lot, but being old school, there were crash and ride cymbals, that's it. Moving forward I get the crash/ride and the ride/crash and from there, the cymbal industry took off and left me in the dust..I still play as a right handed drummer, ride on the right, crash or 2 on the left, or one on the right, maybe one on each side...then there's the middle, forgot that one...thx again
 

Old Drummer

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being old school, there were crash and ride cymbals, that's it.
You didn't attend the old school I went to. In mine, your second cymbal, usually on the left, was also a ride, although there was the thinking that it was a little easier to crash.
 

Seb77

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You didn't attend the old school I went to. In mine, your second cymbal, usually on the left, was also a ride, although there was the thinking that it was a little easier to crash.
Was going to say something similar. When I started out, indeed it was the 80s, and crash and ride types were very separated. There were a few crash rides around, but in general they didn't do anything well and seemed more like economic choices for beginners.
As I mentioned above, the two (or more) ride concept is a bebop jazz one and started in the 1940s, maybe early 50s. I didn't get that concept until after I bought my second dedicated crash cymbal. Fortunately it was somewhat useable as a ride so when I learned that having two rides might be more important (for jazz) than two crashes*, I was able to adjust without having to get another cymbal. Except for some 16" and smaller dedciated crashes, all my cymbals since then had to be able to serve as a ride as well, even though they were labeled crash.
*Interestingly, Roy Haynes, one of the remaining bebop-era drummers, does use one ride and two crashes.
 

Old Drummer

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Was going to say something similar. When I started out, indeed it was the 80s, and crash and ride types were very separated. There were a few crash rides around, but in general they didn't do anything well and seemed more like economic choices for beginners.
As I mentioned above, the two (or more) ride concept is a bebop jazz one and started in the 1940s, maybe early 50s. I didn't get that concept until after I bought my second dedicated crash cymbal. Fortunately it was somewhat useable as a ride so when I learned that having two rides might be more important (for jazz) than two crashes*, I was able to adjust without having to get another cymbal. Except for some 16" and smaller dedciated crashes, all my cymbals since then had to be able to serve as a ride as well, even though they were labeled crash.
*Interestingly, Roy Haynes, one of the remaining bebop-era drummers, does use one ride and two crashes.
We're all shaped by our era and circumstances, but coming up as I did during the 60s in a provincial and vaguely jazz-oriented milieu, I didn't even know that crash cymbals existed. I certainly didn't know any drummer who had them. (Remember, this was before the internet. If it wasn't on "The Ed Sullivan Show," we weren't aware of it.) Zenstat has pointed out the impoverishment of my background by posting catalogs of the time and before listing crash cymbals for sale, but I was unaware of them. For me, it wasn't until circa 1970 when rock drummers started setting up a bunch of cymbals seemingly to crash that I noticed the dedicated crash cymbals, which by the 1980s were everywhere.

To this day I can barely bring myself to buy a cymbal only to crash it. That just seems a waste of money to me. I compromised once an bought a used Sabian B8 crash and now have a K Zildjian crash I got in a trade, but this is as far as I've gone toward the crash-buying frenzy. On the flip side, it bothers me not in the least if a cymbal is labeled "crash." If it serves as a ride too (at least sometimes) I don't care what the label says.

But I'm a product of my past, and my biases aren't necessarily correct. I was though serious about writing that it depends on which old school you attended. There were different ones.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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I know this has been mentioned before but I will repeat this because I really get it . Mel Lewis was quoted as saying every Cymbal in his set up was a ride and every cymbal including hihats was a ride . He said you needed the ride cymbals not the crash cymbals because you and your audience could get tired of the same ride sound for whole songs . He mentioned that even though his cymbals were dark they each had pitches and he had certain cymbals he played behind certain instruments .

For my Big Band I use two rides and a crash that also can be played as a light ride . The cymbals are all darker cymbals .
 

wayne

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That's what im trying to get across here. These old timers grew up with limited choices. Did Buddy and Gene have options?
 

TrickRoll

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I’d guess Buddy and Gene had some input regarding the design of AZ cymbals.

However, even my later K’s were just cymbals - no markings to indicate they were anything particular.

They were what you made them. But they came from a time of less specialized gear.

We have a lot of options today that didn’t exist in the past.
 

cashmanbashman

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Appreciate the imput a lot, but being old school, there were crash and ride cymbals, that's it. Moving forward I get the crash/ride and the ride/crash and from there, the cymbal industry took off and left me in the dust..I still play as a right handed drummer, ride on the right, crash or 2 on the left, or one on the right, maybe one on each side...then there's the middle, forgot that one...thx again
I showed a picture of my large kit to a non musician once. He said holy(CENSORED) how do you know which one to hit at what time? I started to try explaining when I realized I have no good explanation. That’s the answer, there’s no real good explanation.
 


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