Rimshots Technique

L300burn

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I've noticed a bit of soreness from my left forearm. I've been practicing a lot of rock with tons of rim shots. Is this normal or should I just relax my arm a bit more?
 

Matched Gripper

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I've noticed a bit of soreness from my left forearm. I've been practicing a lot of rock with tons of rim shots. Is this normal or should I just relax my arm a bit more?
I don’t experience pain from rimshots, but, taking a page out of the golf and tennis playbook, if your hand and grip are loose and relaxed at impact the shock of impact should terminate in the hand and not transfer to the arm. JMO!
 

toddbishop

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I've never experienced that. You can relax, it doesn't take a lot of force to do a loud rim shot-- let gravity do some of the work. Make sure you're not in a weird position to catch the RS-- like with your wrist bent.
 

Seb77

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I used to have some elbow pain after practising rimshots a lot, maybe this is related to tennis elbow. I got rid of this by paying attention to not throw the stick down (not too much at least), throwing meaning using the trizeps muscle, keep that msucle at the back of your arm as loose ass possible.

As has been mentioned, a looser grip/back fingers?) helps. Plus, let gravity do the work, meaning, drop the stick. Moeller whip technqiue helps with volume. Not sure how loud you play but maybe you should be lifting higher (medium or even large Moeller, check Dom Famularo's videos)? I get all the volume I need from the "low Moeller" though (as do many great drummers).
 

wayne

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When i started playing, rim shots were a big part of drumming, esp in Wipe Out type songs. You would play rimmers and not even know it, but it didn't matter because they fit in anyway. at least i thought they did.
Today, if i have to pick a spot for a rim shot, i,ll try to nail it, if not it sounds like you goofed it up., and you hear that dreaded "click". Years of playing i have good control but i,ll always believe that rim shots should be random but you can learn over years to place them where they are needed for effect and dynamics.
 

Christopher

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The soreness will come if you are holding on to the stick at the instant of impact. The shock is what hits you physically.

if you can, practice “letting go” the instant before contact of the rimshot. Takes some practice, but that will save your arm from the shock and allow the sound to be fuller.
 

MrDrums2112

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Pay attention to your snare drum height. As I have gotten older, it is very uncomfortable if my drums and cymbals are not positioned just right. If the snare is positioned up too high or down too low, I will feel it in my wrist and elbow. It takes some experimenting to find what will work, but it's totally worth the effort and time spent in the long run.
 

Pat A Flafla

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When I started doing multiple 3-hour hard rock gigs each week, I had very slight leg pain from rim shots, because I get thousands of perfect crushing shots in a row with totally relaxed grip, by setting my snare height so that punching my leg yields the perfect shot. It bruised at first. Now it doesn't. Wears holes in pants and shorts though.
 

Phantomlimb777

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Try not to wind up and smash into the drum so much, I like to think a little forward pressure is a good start to get yourself to see how little downward force is required to get the drum to speak.
 

Pat A Flafla

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Try not to wind up and smash into the drum so much, I like to think a little forward pressure is a good start to get yourself to see how little downward force is required to get the drum to speak.
Replace force with height and relaxed momentum. Just accelerate he weight of your arm towards the drum and let gravity do the rest.
 

Seb77

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With piano playing there is the concept of "arm weight". In terms of muscles tension this refers to dropping instead of pushing down with the triceps, for effortless volume.
Imagine your arm has fallen asleep - it is quite heavy. As an awareness exercise, rest your left arm that way, as if it were asleep, on the upper leg (when sitting), then lift it with your right hand and drop it. Both triceps and biceps of your left arm were relaxed. Now lift your left arm by itself (biceps active) and drop it the same way as before (triceps remains passive). You can also feel the back your left upper arm with your right hand doing this to make sure it is not tense. You can practice this without sticks, playing a handd rum or just on your upper leg.
With sticks, you add leverage: if you combine this passive drop with a Moeller whip motion of the hand and stick, you can get a lot of volume. Keep it slow at first.
 

multijd

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Make sure your wrist is turned in a way that you are flexing it. In other words palm down or German grip if you will. The wrist has more flexibility in this position so the “shock” of the rim shot or strong backbeat will be absorbed by the hinge (wrist) before it gets to the elbow. If you turn your thumb up (French grip) the wrist is not as flexible and more shock goes to the elbow.
 


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