Ringo Starr

Velociamator

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Maybe it just happened so fast in his case. Once he joined them it was kinda busy until they stopped in 1970. Even when they had time off after all he was a BEATLE. I don't think anyone but Elvis, Sinatra or Michael Jackson after Thriller knows what that's like. Maybe the band didn't want to jinx the formula by a certain point too? Whatever they did it was a high quality. They were really the only band he's ever been in as the drummer because what he did fit their style magnificently. The jazz snobs make jokes but he had his own unique thing & replicating it is very difficult. The execution & the feel are very different for a regular trained drummer. That's my take anyways...
Yes, but looking at Gene Krupa, who also had few days or nights off after 1935, never stopped listening, learning, evaluating, strengthening the less dominant hand, bringing younger drummers along (Louie B. is the prime example)...I guess it is just all about the attitude of a musician...
 

Velociamator

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Don't make a big deal out of the lefty playing righty thing. That just made his fills a little different. Also his right hand on the hats was "wicked." I'll say again what I said in another thread. Before Ringo, the rock drum back beat was the tat-tat..........tat as in "Walk Don't Run." Then the killer bass drum.......boom..........boom-boom as in "Be My Baby" and "Ragdoll." Hi-hats were played with tight eight-notes. Suddenly Ringo is bashing the hats and using the double bass drum beat at a faster speed. It was exciting. People screamed, guys grew their hair and free love sprouted. Laugh! Well, the pill had a lot to do with the later. There is an important history that he made at the time. Ace
Well,yeah, OK, but when you talk about speed and footwork, how was what Ringo did different from what you hear on "I Hear You Knockin'" by Little Richard (was that Earl Palmer?).
 

drummingbulldog

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Yes, but looking at Gene Krupa, who also had few days or nights off after 1935, never stopped listening, learning, evaluating, strengthening the less dominant hand, bringing younger drummers along (Louie B. is the prime example)...I guess it is just all about the attitude of a musician...
Your comparing Ringo to Krupa. Krupa was a master drummer who already had lessons & knew how to practice. Maybe Ringo didn't give a damn. He rocked & grooved. He was the perfect drummer for the band he was in. When that band ceased, he did other stuff. Ringo was a song drummer. A band drummer. I think what he lacks in technique he made up for with original parts. His attitude was great & was probably the only thing that kept the Beatles together as long as they were.
 

K.O.

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Well,yeah, OK, but when you talk about speed and footwork, how was what Ringo did different from what you hear on "I Hear You Knockin'" by Little Richard (was that Earl Palmer?).
"I Hear You Knockin' " was originally by Smiley Lewis (later covered by Dave Edmunds) and is in 6/8 or has a triplet feel anyway . I think you mean "Keep a Knockin'" a song that Bonham ripped off, excuse me, paid tribute to, for the intro to "Rock and Roll". Both songs may well have been played by Earl Palmer (I don't know, but it's certainly possible). "Lucille" was another Little Richard song that pushed the straight eighths feel.



 

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I’m a lefty who plays a righty kit. I play ball right handed too. But I write with my left hand and hold my fork with my left. But only about a year ago did I realize that most right handed people hold their fork with their right, but switch when it’s time to cut, fork goes to the left, steak knife in the right. I keep my fork in the left hand and cut with the right hand. But I’m not ambidextrous; if I try to write with my right, total scribble. And I always felt more natural keeping time with my right hand and putting my right foot down on 1 so who knows?
I m the same as you.
Someone once told me I’m Bidextrous
( a person who varies )
Ambidextrous is a person with equal facility with both hands and arms
Some useless trivia for us
 

DrummerJustLikeDad

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I m the same as you.
Someone once told me I’m Bidextrous
( a person who varies )
Ambidextrous is a person with equal facility with both hands and arms
Some useless trivia for us
I can write with my antlers. I’m bambidextrous. :reindeer:
 
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thin shell

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OK, so Ringo appeared to us in early February 1964, and he played differently: matched grip, sideways on the Hi-Hats, and as we've been told, playing lefty on a righty "kit". Ask any other drummer at that time, and it'd be who their teacher was, how they developed coordinated independence, their skill at reading charts, etc. With Ringo, however, it was just "I'm playing lefty on a righty kit" and "I was raised by elders who felt lefty was wrong". Oh, yeah, and he stated he could not play the part on "Rain" again. His obvious greatness as a drummer, playing for the song, incredibly solid backbeat, projecting personality, etc. leaves the question of "Why not do it the right way?" Well, maybe it is just some version of "not so much training as to hurt my playing"...but it seemed to me at the time "What is he DOING?"
What constitutes "the right way"? The right way used to be to have a separate drummer playing the bass drum with a hand held beater and a separate drummer playing snare and maybe even others playing cymbals, toms and traps. Once the bass drum pedal was invented then the bass drum player lost his job and the drummer could do snare and bass drum. Once the modern drum set was invented then the drummer was playing all of the drums, cymbals and a lot of the traps. Was it the right way before or after. There is no "right way" to play the drums.

I have read that at a young age Ringo's grandfather taught him to write with his right hand so he became ambidextrous. Playing the drums right handed would be very useful in that he could sit in with other bands easily. If he had learned to play lefty he would not have been able to do that and may have never attained the notoriety that lead to him being asked to join the Beatles.
 

Obiwandrumobe

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I have read that at a young age Ringo's grandfather taught him to write with his right hand so he became ambidextrous. Playing the drums right handed would be very useful in that he could sit in with other bands easily. If he had learned to play lefty he would not have been able to do that and may have never attained the notoriety that lead to him being asked to join the Beatles.
--------------------.------------------------------------------------
Actually, it was Paul's grandfather

brimley.jpg
 

Johnny D

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I m the same as you.
Someone once told me I’m Bidextrous
( a person who varies )
Ambidextrous is a person with equal facility with both hands and arms
Some useless trivia for us
It's also called "Mixed-handed." Doing different things with different hands. I play drums lefty, guitar lefty (really badly), eat, brush my teeth, and a few other things.
I write and throw with my right hand.

I have read that at a young age Ringo's grandfather taught him to write with his right hand so he became ambidextrous. Playing the drums right handed would be very useful in that he could sit in with other bands easily. If he had learned to play lefty he would not have been able to do that and may have never attained the notoriety that lead to him being asked to join the Beatles.
Ambidextrous is the ability to use both hands equally. Ringo is not ambidextrous. He does some things left-handed and some things right-handed. I'm the same way.
 

Ludwigboy

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I agree. People fixate on the lefty playing a righty kit way too much. He plays like a traditional righty, other than leading his fills lefty. That definitely puts a spin on things, but he plays like a righty drummer. I think it's hard for some people to come to grips with the fact that Ringo actually had/HAS a lot of chops and technique. He was/IS a GREAT drummer! Period.


It was the complete opposite for me. I'm a lefty and started playing in 1972 on a right handed kit, playing the hi hat with my left hand and bass drum with my right foot, until about six months into playing, a drummer friend told me I should switch my kit around to a traditional lefty set-up, which I did. That was 47 years ago. I wish I'd stayed with a righty set-up and keep telling myself I should try and learn that way. And like Ringo, I write with my right hand. As does Carter Beauford, who also plays left-hand lead on a righty kit. It's called "mixed handedness." Fellow DFO'r @Bun Carlos falls into the category of a lefty playing a righty kit.
I agree, I think Ringo has a lot of chops and technique..... I think of him also as an "instinctual" drummer; just knows which fill to use that really fits the song ; I find it is is hard to replicate him on the side to side stroke on the hi-hat; the cymbal sound going through the recording compressor/limiter doesn't help ....:)
 

TheBeachBoy

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I’m a lefty who plays a righty kit. I play ball right handed too. But I write with my left hand and hold my fork with my left. But only about a year ago did I realize that most right handed people hold their fork with their right, but switch when it’s time to cut, fork goes to the left, steak knife in the right. I keep my fork in the left hand and cut with the right hand. But I’m not ambidextrous; if I try to write with my right, total scribble. And I always felt more natural keeping time with my right hand and putting my right foot down on 1 so who knows?
I used to switch the fork to my right hand after cutting food but now I just leave it in my left hand. Incidentally, I also hold it in "traditional" grip when it's in my left hand. My band noticed that during a meal break at a wedding we played. I'm a righty in most things but I'm comfortable using my left for lots of stuff, and I think drumming helped with that.
 

rhythmace

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I agree, I think Ringo has a lot of chops and technique..... I think of him also as an "instinctual" drummer; just knows which fill to use that really fits the song ; I find it is is hard to replicate him on the side to side stroke on the hi-hat; the cymbal sound going through the recording compressor/limiter doesn't help ....:)
Ringo pretty much stopped doing that at one point.
 


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