Roasted shells?

jtpaistegeist

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Beefsurgeon

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This would be interesting. Roasted necks are said to be significantly more brittle than a standard neck--I wonder how that would affect the sound of a drum shell?
 

jtpaistegeist

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This would be interesting. Roasted necks are said to be significantly more brittle than a standard neck--I wonder how that would affect the sound of a drum shell?

I'm not sure about the brittle nature of roasted wood. There are acrylic and even glass shelled drums, so I would imagine a well constructed shell would hold up. A nice solid steam bent maple shell, then roasted might be something?
 

Beefsurgeon

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I'm not sure about the brittle nature of roasted wood. There are acrylic and even glass shelled drums, so I would imagine a well constructed shell would hold up. A nice solid steam bent maple shell, then roasted might be something?
I agree that it shouldn't be an issue in terms of the shell breaking or anything. There might be some problems with warping if you were to roast a fully formed shell though (Quick, someone bake their Craviotto at 300° and let us know!). Joking aside, I think it would definitely be feasible to roast a plank of wood prior to making a stave or block shell from it.

Here's a quick read about roasted maple guitar necks. I wonder if the recent surge in popularity is due to the search for aesthetic alternatives to Rosewood fretboards?
 

JazzDrumGuy

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What? Never heard of a roasted guitar neck. I read up on it and it sounds bogus to me. I'd have to play one side by side with my own guitars to tell, I suppose.

I then read the above link and I don't think I would like a roasted guitar neck. If it weakens the wood and makes it brittle, I could just see over tightening of the tension rods ripping off the lugs! Uh, no thanks......
 

Tornado

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Promark firegrain sticks are supposed to last a really long time, if that's the kind of roasting. The idea has some merit. Probably not a good idea for ply drums, just thinking about the effect of the glue. Maybe it would work on stave drums if the wood was roasted prior to assembly.
 

noreastbob

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Sounds like BS to me. Another case of dreaming up a new sales pitch. All you're going to do cooking wood is dry it to a bone. Then take it out and watch it re-absorb moisture to stasis. You could accomplish the same thing alternately storing the drums inside and outside. Why would you want to put a once living cell structure through that torture?
I bet they're gluten free though. And they could be good with sauce...
 

backtodrum

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All plywood for shells is already Kiln dried before the plywood layers are glued and placed in shell molds. They take the moisture level to a desired level for each ply long before they are glued into shells so that the shell does not de-laminate, move or split. All the term "roasted" means is they put guitar necks in a kiln / 300 degree oven and bring down the moisture level to the desired degree to further stabilize the wood in an effort to make it more resistant to environmental changes. So with that thought in mind, I would imagine all ply drum shells are already roasted, we just don't refer to them in that terminology.
 

thin shell

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All plywood for shells is already Kiln dried before the plywood layers are glued and placed in shell molds. They take the moisture level to a desired level for each ply long before they are glued into shells so that the shell does not de-laminate, move or split. All the term "roasted" means is they put guitar necks in a kiln / 300 degree oven and bring down the moisture level to the desired degree to further stabilize the wood in an effort to make it more resistant to environmental changes. So with that thought in mind, I would imagine all ply drum shells are already roasted, we just don't refer to them in that terminology.
Standard Kiln drying of hardwood is around 176 degrees F. This "roasting" method takes it to 300 degrees F so not the same thing.
 

thin shell

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bellbrass

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I thought the gradual opening of the pores, through aging, is what made the wood sound so much better, compared to new wood.
 

Tornado

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I thought the gradual opening of the pores, through aging, is what made the wood sound so much better, compared to new wood.
I thought it was supposedly the hardening of the wood as it aged.
 

backtodrum

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This article seems to spell out what "toasting" actually does without any hype.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/nov15/roast-your-own/

"Luthiers have long used roasted or tempered wood in stringed instruments because the roasting process pre-stresses the wood and caramelizes the sugars, sealing the pores and rendering them more resistant to moisture. "


This supplier goes into a little more detail.

https://americanspecialtyhardwoods.com/roasting/
Cool Article it sheds so much more light on the subject!
 

Tornado

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I rewatched a DW video, and they already heat theirs to 200 and press them at 2600 PSI in their shell molds. What's another 100 degrees for a few minutes?
 

noreastbob

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This article seems to spell out what "toasting" actually does without any hype.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/nov15/roast-your-own/

"Luthiers have long used roasted or tempered wood in stringed instruments because the roasting process pre-stresses the wood and caramelizes the sugars, sealing the pores and rendering them more resistant to moisture. "


This supplier goes into a little more detail.

https://americanspecialtyhardwoods.com/roasting/
Isn't this the same as annealing metals which is to DE-stress the material?
 

RIDDIM

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Would this work for drum set veneers, or would roasting render them too brittle?
 


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