Rocket Shells snare restoration

Denzelicious

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*First time posting here.*

Hello, all you skin beaters! ;)

I was going through some of my old gear, and I came across my Rocket Snare that I purchased in the early 2000's. After stripping the hardware and looking closer, I noticed that there are a few cracks, chips, and some lug rash in the clear coat(?) that I'm assuming was caused by overtightening the top head.

My question is, does anybody have any recommendations on how I can repair the cracks, and imperfections around the shell so that I can restore this beauty to like new condition?

Any help getting her back to her old glory would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time, and have a great day!

- On a side note, I'm wanting to replace the old chrome hardware with white, but I'm having a difficult time finding colored lug options other than tube lugs (I don't mind tube lugs, just would like some different options). The rims are chrome diecast, and in decent shape. Would I be better off stripping the chrome plating and painting white, rather than searching for white hoops? If so, any recommendation on type of paint?
 

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thin shell

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You are probably going to have to sand the clear coat down all the way. That will probably end up destroying the blue finish underneath unless you are very careful. Powder coated hardware fell out of fashion quite a while ago so if you want white hardware you are probably going to have to do it yourself. You can get it powder coated and they will bead blast everything before applying the finish. You could paint them yourself but paint won't hold up well.
 

Denzelicious

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You are probably going to have to sand the clear coat down all the way. That will probably end up destroying the blue finish underneath unless you are very careful. Powder coated hardware fell out of fashion quite a while ago so if you want white hardware you are probably going to have to do it yourself. You can get it powder coated and they will bead blast everything before applying the finish. You could paint them yourself but paint won't hold up well.
You're probably right, Thin Shell. I'm hoping to find a way around sanding out the entire shell, but that may be the only way.

So, you don't think there's a way to maybe just sand out the bad spots (dremel/sand paper), patch with a clear epoxy, and sand/polish to match, or something like that? I'm a fairly handy person, but I'd still be petrified to ruin the finish (or worse yet, the carbon fiber) by going at the entire shell.
 

thin shell

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A Dremel should not even be a consideration. It will burn through that finish in a blink of an eye. The finish on drums is exactly like a high end paint job on a car as far as prep and application. It requires a lot of skill and practice. I mean no offense but the fact that you have been considering a Dremel as an appropriate tool for this repair tells me you don't have that level of expertise to repair this finish.

If it were a lacquer then you would feather sand down the cracks and apply some new lacquer as it can melt and blend in with the old finish. That is most likely some sort of polyester finish which won't do that. You maybe able to the same polyester but I don't think it will be as invisible as a lacquer finish. This is assuming you have a lot of experience working with these types of finishes.
 

Denzelicious

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A Dremel should not even be a consideration. It will burn through that finish in a blink of an eye. The finish on drums is exactly like a high end paint job on a car as far as prep and application. It requires a lot of skill and practice. I mean no offense but the fact that you have been considering a Dremel as an appropriate tool for this repair tells me you don't have that level of expertise to repair this finish.

If it were a lacquer then you would feather sand down the cracks and apply some new lacquer as it can melt and blend in with the old finish. That is most likely some sort of polyester finish which won't do that. You maybe able to the same polyester but I don't think it will be as invisible as a lacquer finish. This is assuming you have a lot of experience working with these types of finishes.
Well here's the reply I got back from now Rocket Composite's CEO. Notice he mentions "grinding" out the crack. ;) I do not have the expertise on finish repair as you mentioned, which is why I'm asking for advise on here, but please don't make assumptions about my skills based off of my suggestion of a certain tool.

"Hi Dennis,

Beautiful snare drum! Did you buy this from us at NAMM?

Unfortunately, we are no longer manufacturing drum shells. The cracks in the clear coat are superficial only, but they are very difficult to repair. We have had moderate success in the past grinding out some of the crack and refinishing with a surfboard type resin, but it may cause more damage than good.

Sorry I could not be of more assistance,

Regards,


Paul Hewitt - CEO, BSME
Rocket Composites, Inc.
ISO 9001:2015 / AS9100D"
 

Dumpy

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Welcome to the forum!

You could grind out the crack very carefully by hand using 80 grit sand paper very carefully. Paul is right that it may cause more damage than good. This is a ten foot pole thing for me.

Without talking to Paul, my guess (as an experienced composites repair and fabricator) is that they finished the outside of the shell with something that doesn’t expand/contract well, which is easy with a plastic (meaning non flexible) material. Finishing composites can be tricky from my own experience. I always sent my builds out to a painter. There are a multitude of reasons why that clear is cracking.

If it were mine, I would either learn to live with it, or scuff sand the whole thing and prime and paint; I would most likely send it to a person experienced with composites finishing, either a Corvette painter or a goalie mask painter.
 
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JazzDrumGuy

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Wooden steering wheels have similar issues. There are kits and tips out there on car forums and YT....search for them.
 


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