Rogers Dyno-Matic Hi-Hat Stand (RDH7) Review

rstange1

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In another thread, I was singing the praises of the new Rogers hardware based on experience with my Dyna-Sonic reissue snare and Dyno-Matic bass drum pedal -- both keepers for sure. So, when I had a chance to pick up a new Rogers Dyno-Matic hi-hat stand (RDH7) at a discounted (Black Friday) price, I jumped on it and placed my order. Following are my initial impressions:

Pros:
  • On the light side of medium weight. Not as light as a Yamaha Crosstown or DW Ultralight, but not a strain on your gear bag (or back).
  • Funky retro design with styling and functional queues reminiscent of my vintage Rogers swan leg stand.
  • Quick release clutch is a nice feature at this price point.
  • Spring tension is easy to adjust and there are four settings.
  • The memory lock for the top tube is minimalist but effective, and although not something I've seen on vintage gear before, has a definite vintage vibe.
  • The tilter screw for the bottom hat is knurled like you would expect, but is also machined as a hex screw AND Rogers threw in a hex key so you can give the screw a little extra snugness once you have your ideal tilt dialed in.

Cons:
  • Once my favourite hats were mounted, first playing impressions were underwhelming. The whole thing felt sluggish and hard to modulate. Adjusting the spring tension didn't help, so I started looking for other adjustments but came up short.
  • The angle of the footboard relative to the floor is quite shallow. Your foot is almost horizontal by the time the hats engage if you have an inch or more of gap between top and bottom hats when opened. This feels very unusual and contributes significantly to the sluggish feel.
  • I was excited to see that the pull-chain is attached to the footboard with a drum-key-ready pull screw. Unfortunately, that excitement evaporated when I realized there wasn't any way to adjust the length of the chain to get more angle on the footboard. More on that later.
  • That funky retro design looks good on stage (or even from ten feet away), but up close, there are a number of modern design elements (like the wing screws) that detract from the vintage vibe and/or are over-built (heavy).
  • Speaking of heavy, that fancy quick release clutch is quite substantial. At 180 grams it is almost twice the weight of my vintage Rogers clutch (which is unfortunately too small for the new pull-rod). I swapped in a clutch from my DW Ultralight stand and my lightest set of hats, and that sluggishness I referred to diminished by about half.
  • The chrome on the pull-rod has some random imperfections, so fine-tuning the location of your top hat can be bumpy, inconsistent and frustrating.
  • The tripod legs do not fold and unfold easily.

Verdict:
Compared to the other Rogers gear I own (vintage Celebrity set with all the hardware, reissue Dyna-Sonic snare and Dyno-Matic bass drum pedal), the Dyno-Matic hi-hat stand is a disappointment. I knew going in that it had a vintage vibe much in the same way a new Mustang or Camaro is reminiscent of their predecessors from the '60s. So I didn't expect a reissue like the amazing Dyna-Sonic snare drum, but I did expect a companion (in quality, adjustability and execution) to the excellent Dyno-Matic bass drum pedal. From ten feet away it looks the part, but up close and in use, it just doesn't measure up.​

Epiloge:
That footboard angle was driving me nuts! I was looking at ways to remove links from the chain or otherwise adjust things and got an idea. Right behind the spot on the footboard where the pull-chain fastens is a machined-in slot for a toe-stop. The hi-hat stand doesn't come with a toe-stop, but the bass drum pedal does. So, I borrowed the toe-stop from my bass drum pedal and used that as the receiver for the pull screw that fastens the chain to the footboard. That shortened the effective length of the chain (raising the footboard angle) and gave me some adjustability to fine tune.​
With a more normal footboard angle, playing the hi-hats now feels much better. I need to give it some time to see if all of that sluggishness is really gone and not just a placebo effect. And I'm hoping I haven't introduced an unreasonable amount of stress on the chain with my improvised mounting method. Time will tell...​
 
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rstange1

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Here are some photos regarding footboard angle. First zero the level:
IMG_1753.jpeg


The angle of the new Dyno-Matic:
IMG_1758.jpeg


And for contrast, the angle of my vintage Swivo-Matic:
IMG_1757.jpeg


And for reference, the angle of my DW Ultralight:
IMG_1759.jpeg
 

rstange1

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Here's my work-around for the Dyno-Matic footboard angle. This is how the chain attaches to the footboard:
IMG_1760.jpeg


And the footboard with the chain removed:
IMG_1752.jpeg


Here's the toe-stop from my Dyno-Matic bass drum pedal:
IMG_1761.jpeg


And the chain attached to the toe-stop:
IMG_1762.jpeg


Adjusted to its extreme, I've almost doubled the footboard angle:
IMG_1764.jpeg


For now, I'm running in the mid-point of the adjustment range:
IMG_1767.jpeg
 

rstange1

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Here's a wingscrew and tube lock comparison between Dyno-Matic and Swivo-Matic:
IMG_1749.jpeg

IMG_1756.jpeg


And a peek at the spring adjustment on the Dyno-Matic:
IMG_1750.jpeg


Here's the Dyno-Matic memory lock (I love this, it's so simple!):
IMG_1770.jpeg
IMG_1771.jpeg


And the tilter screw, 1/8" Allen key, etc.
IMG_1772.jpeg


And finally a little wingscrew comparison -- new Rodgers to new Gibraltar:
IMG_1773.jpeg
IMG_1774.jpeg
 

maxb2k

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Excellent review rstange1. Now that you have your pedal more dialed in could you compare and contrast with your vintage swivomatic hihat specifically regarding foot action, which one is more responsive, and how the two compare weight wise? Also, does the foot stop present any kind of obstruction ?

Thanks, Max
 

Johnny Blonde

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I thought the same thing when I first saw the angle of the foot board, " No way is this ever going to be comfortable!" I exclaimed. Looks pretty flimsy as well. On the other hand, it worked for Bonzo, so maybe...

I loved it the minute I set it up. I've got several hi hat stands that may be considered superior, Ludwig Pro, Iron Cora and are most certainly bigger and heavier but I come back to the Rogers everytime. The footboard has never been an issue. I love the combination of this hi hat stand with the Speed King, they just feel good together. Never switching.
 

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Shovel&Pale

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Just got mine and I have to say I am underwhelmed. The whole thing just seems cheap. I've been using the strap drive pedal and absolutely love it. It almost weighs as much as the stand!

I'm also disappointed to see the lack of spikes on a modern stand. They at least could have put the same sort of backing that's on the bottom of the pedal on the bottom of the down post. If you were really laying into it on the wrong surface, it will slide.

Sticking with my Gibraltar Pro Lite. My daughter can have this one.
 
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amosguy

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I like the stand just fine myself. But your idea to change the footboard angle will inspire me to see what I can come up with myself.

I like to have a splash above my hats (saves a stand) and have put an extension on the original swivomatic stand rod I also use. Easy since Rogers provides the extension rod for just this purpose. Imagine my surprise to discover that the new rod is not the standard thread, or even a 6 or 8 mm size rod. It is 7 mm, and finding a double nut and thread stock to make the extansion was a challenge. Not usual off the shelf parts. Took some hunting but I did find what I needed. Had to buy 36" thread stock, so if anyone wants to add to theirs, let me know. I have plenty left over.
 


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