Rogers sixties metal Dynasonic questions

frankmott

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I just got this Dynasonic. It's in pretty good shape, just needs to be cleaned up and re-headed. The snare frame is completely intact (one wire is missing). I'm probably going to end up selling it (I'm keeping the rest of the set!). When did Rogers go from 5-line to 7-line (or the other way around?)? Is one more desirable than the other?
Thanks in advance.
 

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evolving_machine

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I have a 5" and a 6 1/2" Chrome over Bronze Dynasonic. Both of mine are 5 line drums. I am not sure when the 5 or 7 line came out, and I heard that the 7 line were more desirable. I like using the 6 1/2 for jazz because I can raise the tension on the batter head and still get a deeper sound. For rock, I don't need the batter to have as much bounce. I am using Aquarian Modern Vintage on both of the drums batter heads. The coating is incredible. Especially when compared to the Remo coating that wears out faster.
 
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levelpebble

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I have a 5" and a 6 1/2" Chrome over Bronze Dynasonic. Both of mine are 5 line drums. I am not sure when the 5 or 7 line came out, and I heard that the 7 line were more desirable. I like using the 6 1/2 for jazz because I can raise the tension on the batter head and still get a deeper sound. For rock, I don't need the batter to have as much bounce. I am using Aquarian Modern Vintage on both of the drums batter heads. The coating is incredible. Especially when compared to the Remo coating that wears out faster.

Chrome over Brass, not Bronze. The 7 line are far more sought after, they ran until about 66/67, so one could say 'pre-CBS', but I don't think there's necessarily a direct connection. 5 liner's ran through til the end.
 

amosguy

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I doubt that anyone can blind test both shells and tell the difference.
 

frankmott

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Thanks again for the help. I took it apart and cleaned it up a bit -- hardly a fine detailing, but I got most of the decades-long schmutz off. It's clean, as in not dirty (as opposed to "minty").
I understand the function of the snare bridge (even though I think it's over-wrought). But what do the black strings do? I put them back exactly as I found them, but I can't figure out what they're function is. The entire mechanism seems like "a solution in search of a problem," which has been a common failing in the drum industry for decades it seems.

EDIT (2 minutes later): I think I figured it out. First, I have the snare-side hoop on backwards. Second, fixing it won't be that much of a problem because the strings hold the snare bridge to the hoop so one can more easily change heads! (am I right?) But I have to re-thread the whole fussy thing now.
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DanC

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The black 'strings' should be elastic bands. They are there to pull the frame away from the head when the snares are 'off'. This is done to eliminate any rattling of the snare frame when the drum is played with the snares off. I have never found the rattling to be a problem, and the elastics were not used in the later years, so there ya go.....

The wires need to be snugly tensioned in the frame, and the frame adjusted to only lightly contact the bottom head - just enough to get a crisp snare sound. And 'crisp' is the operative word: these drums are masters of rudimental playing and light-fingered types of jazz. Fat backbeat monsters they are not.

I love Dynasonics for their history and beauty, but an 8-lug Powertone is what works for me....
 
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evolving_machine

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Chrome over Brass, not Bronze. The 7 line are far more sought after, they ran until about 66/67, so one could say 'pre-CBS', but I don't think there's necessarily a direct connection. 5 liner's ran through til the end.
Thanks, I had cymbals on my mind.
 

idrum4fun

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The black 'strings' should be elastic bands. They are there to pull the frame away from the head when the snares are 'off'. This is done to eliminate any rattling of the snare frame when the drum is played with the snares off. I have never found the rattling to be a problem, and the elastics were not used in the later years, so there ya go.....

The wires need to be snugly tensioned in the frame, and the frame adjusted to only lightly contact the bottom head - just enough to get a crisp snare sound. And 'crisp' is the operative word: these drums a masters of rudimental playing and light-fingered types of jazz. Fat backbeat monsters they are not.

I love Dynasonics for their history and beauty, but an 8-lug Powertone is what works for me....
DanC hit the nail on the head with the elastic bands! As an FYI, they were installed after a fine drummer, Ed Thigpen, liked to "hand drum" on his Dynasonic and found that this caused the snare frame to rattle. As mentioned in the "Rogers Book", this became a design challenge and the elastic bands solved the problem. As mentioned, the vast majority of drummers, including myself, never had this issue. The bands didn't last long...and there's no real need for them, other than if you want your Dynasonic to look like the picture in the 1968 catalog!! Let's just say that installing them correctly is a real pain!

-Mark
 

boucherdv

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DanC hit the nail on the head with the elastic bands! As an FYI, they were installed after a fine drummer, Ed Thigpen, liked to "hand drum" on his Dynasonic and found that this caused the snare frame to rattle. As mentioned in the "Rogers Book", this became a design challenge and the elastic bands solved the problem. As mentioned, the vast majority of drummers, including myself, never had this issue. The bands didn't last long...and there's no real need for them, other than if you want your Dynasonic to look like the picture in the 1968 catalog!! Let's just say that installing them correctly is a real pain!

-Mark

That is an interesting bit of history. Thigpen was a great drummer. Do you happen to know when the first frames drilled for the elastic bands showed up? I seem to recall them fading out in the Big R era.
 

mattmalloy66

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My 7 line is relatively early with a 4 digit serial number. Probably `66. It did have the remains of the black elastics on it when i found it.
It does have 2 strands of the snare wires cut off by the previous owner who bought it new.
Any good original condition Dynasonic whether, 7 or 5 line, is a great drum.
I don't think I would ever sell mine.
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Matched Gripper

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The black 'strings' should be elastic bands. They are there to pull the frame away from the head when the snares are 'off'. This is done to eliminate any rattling of the snare frame when the drum is played with the snares off. I have never found the rattling to be a problem, and the elastics were not used in the later years, so there ya go.....

The wires need to be snugly tensioned in the frame, and the frame adjusted to only lightly contact the bottom head - just enough to get a crisp snare sound. And 'crisp' is the operative word: these drums are masters of rudimental playing and light-fingered types of jazz. Fat backbeat monsters they are not.

I love Dynasonics for their history and beauty, but an 8-lug Powertone is what works for me....
Sounds like a pretty fat backbeat to me.

 

DanC

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Here's a thread from 13 years ago, from the Forum, and it contains some comments from 2 of the Forum's heavyweights: the late, great Tommy Wells, and John Frondelli, who sadly no longer visits here.

The magic of the studio being what it is, the answer will surprise many of us as it surprised me way back then:

 


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