Safest way to clean cymbals

singleordoubleheads

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It's all personal opinion, but to me "patina" is another word for dirt or grime. I don't want patina on my teeth or my new car--why would I want it on an expensive musical instrument like a cymbal?
 

drummerjohn333

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singleordoubleheads said:
It's all personal opinion, but to me "patina" is another word for dirt or grime. I don't want patina on my teeth or my new car--why would I want it on an expensive musical instrument like a cymbal?
I recently picked up a 60s Zilly 22in ride....plenty of patina and....obvious dirt. Sounds great if you like that drier & warmer sound. At the same time, I always prefer a clean cymbal so that I can hear what the cymbal maker/manufacturer intended. I believe if I clean it, it will brighten it up - yet still maintain the sound that a 60s big 22in Zilly ride is known to have. How can it sound as intended when all those fine lathing grooves are filled with dirt? While we all like the shape/tone we achieve by a big 22 and a vintage Zilly - I also want to 'pretty' sound that is achieved by the fine lathing - when clean.
 

rikkrebs

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singleordoubleheads said:
It's all personal opinion, but to me "patina" is another word for dirt or grime. I don't want patina on my teeth or my new car--why would I want it on an expensive musical instrument like a cymbal?
I agree 100%, but that's just my opinion.
 

judge

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Re: Wrights Brass Polish

California Proposition 65 Warning: WARNING: This product contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and/or birth defects or other reproductive harm
 

drumrman2002

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The stuff that works best for me just to do a light 'maintenance cleaning' is Paiste cymbal polish. If I need to deep clean a cymbal like on my Paiste 404 black label crash I restored a few months ago, I use more aggressive cleaners. Those cleaners may remove the logo. Some good choices are:
A) liquid Barkeepers Friend and a fine bristle body brush
B) The Works tub & tile cleaner with the same brush
C) Twinkle Copper Cleaner/polish

After cleaning the cymbal, I usually give it a coat of Liquid Glass to protect it. It lasts quite a bit longer than the Paiste Cymbal Protector.
 

drummerjohn333

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drumrman2002 said:
The stuff that works best for me just to do a light 'maintenance cleaning' is Paiste cymbal polish. If I need to deep clean a cymbal like on my Paiste 404 black label crash I restored a few months ago, I use more aggressive cleaners. Those cleaners may remove the logo. Some good choices are:
A) liquid Barkeepers Friend and a fine bristle body brush
B) The Works tub & tile cleaner with the same brush
C) Twinkle Copper Cleaner/polish

After cleaning the cymbal, I usually give it a coat of Liquid Glass to protect it. It lasts quite a bit longer than the Paiste Cymbal Protector.
Be careful using any brush. I once used a "soft" toohbrush with liquid BKF. It scratched the hell out of the cymbal (which in this case was a B20).
 

kip

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I used to use a cleaner called ZUD but haven't seen it in years.
Last time I clean the metal, I used lime juice and water. Worked wonderfully.

crust the cymbal w a little salt, add tequila ....

:)
 

xsabers

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judge said:
Re: Wrights Brass Polish

California Proposition 65 Warning: WARNING: This product contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and/or birth defects or other reproductive harm
The Prop 65 list is close to 1000 entries long. It includes such harmful elements like:

Wood dust
Unleaded Gas
Salted Fish
Oral Contraceptives
Nitrous Oxide
Leather dust
Aspirin
Aloe Vera
Alcoholic beverages

Of course, it also includes some real bad actors, but this warning should be viewed through the lens of understanding that the product, when used as directed, has passed muster and been declared safe to use. Often times, the elements in question are only harmful if ingested, or ingested in massive amounts, or only harmful to pregnant women, etc. Chances are many household cleaners will include a Prop 65 or similar warning.

Of the four ingredients listed, I don't find any of them on the Pro 65 database. Here's what the US Dept. of Health and Human Services says about Wright's Brass polish:





Warnings:

For sensitive skin, wear rubber gloves. In case of eye contact, flush with water.



Acute Health Effects:

From MSDS
Primary routes of entry: Skin, eyes, inhalation
Eye Contact: Product is an eye irritant. In case of contact with eyes, flush eyes thoroughly with water and seek medical attention.
Skin Contact: Product is a skin irritant. Wear rubber gloves for prolonged use or if skin is sensitive.
Inhalation: Inhalation of ammonia fumes directly from bottle opening may cause irritation of the nose.
Ingestion: Product is not toxic.
Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: None given.



Chronic Health Effects:

From MSDS
None given.



Carcinogenicity:

The manufacturer's Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) does not state whether the ingredients are considered carcinogens or potential carcinogens.



Health Rating:

1



Flammability Rating:

0



Reactivity Rating:

0



HMIS Rating Scale:

0 = Minimal; 1 = Slight; 2 = Moderate; 3 = Serious; 4 = Severe;
N = No information provided by manufacturer; * = Chronic Health Hazard
 

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