Sanding off paint on bass hoops!

Jazzhead

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This might be a very easy question for you but since I don’t have experience doing this I wanted to ask you.
So I want to sand off the lousy touch up the previous owner did on some parts of the bass drum hoops, I only want to sand those parts off, not the entire hoop, most of the hoop has its original paint on it, so think as if the original paint on the hoop was worn and gone, what sand paper should I use to get to that look? Any tips?
 

amosguy

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Gonna need to sane the entire hoop or the touch up paint will look different in the new places. I start with 180 grit and mover to 220. No need to sand to bare wood. Primer is a idea, even over old paint to get new paint to adhere well. Also helps you know where the new paint has been sprayed. Paingint black over black can be a challenge to seeing full coverage. 2 coats of your favored black, depending if the original were shiny or matte type finish. Remember to tape off the inset if there.

All this IMHO and worked well for a decade of playing the restoration game.

Good luck.
 

Jazzhead

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Gonna need to sane the entire hoop or the touch up paint will look different in the new places. I start with 180 grit and mover to 220. No need to sand to bare wood. Primer is a idea, even over old paint to get new paint to adhere well. Also helps you know where the new paint has been sprayed. Paingint black over black can be a challenge to seeing full coverage. 2 coats of your favored black, depending if the original were shiny or matte type finish. Remember to tape off the inset if there.

All this IMHO and worked well for a decade of playing the restoration game.

Good luck.
Thanks for the tips, I am not refinishing the hoop or any part of the hoop, I am only sanding those spotty lousy touch up paint here and there and leave those parts with just the wood finish, do I still need to start with 180 grit and move to 220?
By the way, my hoops are not black, they are matte grey with black inlay.
 
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Drumbumcrumb

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For a distressed look (I think that’s what you’re going for) there’s no need to sand in steps... Just use the fine grained paper right off the bat, try a 320 or even 400 to start. Go down to 220 if you need to, I guess it depends on the size of the touches up spots and how much distressing you want to do. This way you take off only what you want, you have a lot of control and when it looks good you just stop.

You don’t want it sanded looking and uniformly scratched - you want it worn looking. Make sure to be random-ish, throw in some scuffs where needed to make it authentic looking, make some scuffs with the lower grit paper here and there... It’s a cool look, especially with inlayed hoops.

Maybe some form of clear coat on them after you’re done? Idk, something to think about.
 

Jazzhead

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For a distressed look (I think that’s what you’re going for) there’s no need to sand in steps... Just use the fine grained paper right off the bat, try a 320 or even 400 to start. Go down to 220 if you need to, I guess it depends on the size of the touches up spots and how much distressing you want to do. This way you take off only what you want, you have a lot of control and when it looks good you just stop.

You don’t want it sanded looking and uniformly scratched - you want it worn looking. Make sure to be random-ish, throw in some scuffs where needed to make it authentic looking, make some scuffs with the lower grit paper here and there... It’s a cool look, especially with inlayed hoops.

Maybe some form of clear coat on them after you’re done? Idk, something to think about.
My main objective is to get rid of that touch up paint, the original hoop paint is matte grey and the touch up paint is shiny glossy silver, mostly on the edges. So I want to sand them down and when it gets down to the wood just stop, I will try to make it look naturally worn paint on hoop, well it was that before he painted those parts.
So maybe start with a 320 to have better control of when I want to stop.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I agree I need to see it. If you just need to knock down the shine, without removing the paint, try a kitchen sponge (2 sided - foam and green scrubby side). Use the scrubby side - it should remove the shine without removing the paint. Do at your own risk. You can get stiffer abrasive sponges that are very stiff and those will for sure kill the shine/finish. I think if the matte good finish is good, it will look funky with worn wood-only parts.......
 

Jazzhead

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I agree I need to see it. If you just need to knock down the shine, without removing the paint, try a kitchen sponge (2 sided - foam and green scrubby side). Use the scrubby side - it should remove the shine without removing the paint. Do at your own risk. You can get stiffer abrasive sponges that are very stiff and those will for sure kill the shine/finish. I think if the matte good finish is good, it will look funky with worn wood-only parts.......
No I need to remove the paint, the paint is silver, not really grey. I noticed the entire outer side was actually repainted in this glossy silver finish but the inside is the original matte grey Premier finish. Not sure what I will do. I will send pics.
 

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