Scale for weighing cymbals

JazzDrumGuy

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They should have a tare feature - once you put the tube on it and press tare, it zeros out so the tube weight is no longer registered.

Unfortunately I also have to use a tube, or water bottle, or whatever is handy. The reason is because my display is not lit and you just can't see the display with the cymbal on the scale. My mom-in-law has a fancy schmancy digital food scale with a LIT display which is awesome but by the 4-5th time of me bringing cymbals and such to her kitchen to weigh them, I figured it's better to just get my own......
 

bongomania

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I use any sort of tall cylinder like a spray can, or round container of slug repellent, or big mason jar. With most digi scales the tare function is included and super easy (just press a button); one way around not having an easy-to-use tare feature is to put the can/jar on the scale before turning it on. That way the scale will zero out with the weight of the can/jar there already figured in.
 

kdrumSTL

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Worth it to buy a scale for home use, especially at under $10. I've got a couple of them, I use a tall scotch whisky cardboard container to tare, then put the cymbal on top so that I can still read the weight. Can use it for postal weight measurements also, as a bonus.
 

Joe A

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I like the tare ideas. I simply shine a bright flashlight under the cymbal to read the weight.
 

Pounder

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I noticed a good price on those postal scales. Maybe I'll get one sometime. I don't actively search out cymbals like I used to, though. Even then it was a trip to the neighborhood post office, and conversion of the lbs oz to grams.
 

Dougie Stix

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I have to get one of these too. I have an old Zildjian ride that only has an old logo on it. A store expert could not identify what model it is. Thinking I can narrow it down if in knew its exact weight. It's a loud ride. I believe from the 60's. This forum gives me too many things to do!
 

zenstat

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I have to get one of these too. I have an old Zildjian ride that only has an old logo on it. A store expert could not identify what model it is. Thinking I can narrow it down if in knew its exact weight. It's a loud ride. I believe from the 60's. This forum gives me too many things to do!
Weight can be helpful to work out a model, but I would recommend you start by reading up on production eras first. Homework links. :glasses8:

annotated timeline (quick index)
hammering and lathing
bells
image gallery

That tells you how to recognize production eras from trademarks, hammering, lathing style, and bell details. Weights for the Medium Ride (for a given diameter) changed over the decades. Once you narrow down the production era then you can get into bell size and shape in combination with weight to identify a model. I haven't published a summary of all my data yet but if you give me something to work with (photos of the trademark stamp, any ink, photo from the top, photo from the bottom, profile photo) that is a start. Then we can add a weight into the mix. Even with all that there are many cymbals where we can't yet give a specific model with a reliable accuracy. :dontknow:
 
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