School me on Rogers Powertone snare drums

Drum Play

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Ok..what i know about vintage drums you can fit in a thimble. I'm reading books..ex. guide to vintage drums, but i'm lost. I've seen fullerton powertone snare drums go for about $150.00, then i see wood ones go for more than $400. Can someone please explain the logic. Again as i said i'm new to vintage drums and trying to fully understand the market. I had a chance to get a good looking powertone for $125.00 in nashville but didn't, thinking i'd have the chance again but no luck. Oh the powertone was a fullerton.
 
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RickP

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The wood models were made in smaller quantities therefore they are more rare. This accounts for the price differential. If you really want to see a large difference between metal she'll and wood shell snares check out the Dynasonics.

The Powertone snares regardless of shell material are really nice sounding snare drums. My personal preference is for the chrome ove brass metal shell models.
 

troutstudio

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Powertones are all great. But I think the wood shell version is about the the best 5" vintage wood drum made. It all came together for Rogers in that drum as far as I'm concerned. $00.02
 

MrDrums2112

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Agree with everything above - wood shell PowerTones are more rare and demand more money. The lower price on the Fullerton could be because that is a later era drum, and Fullerton is when Rogers quality started to drop off (others more knowledgeable about Rogers may chime in here, I'm only guessing). I have a Dayton era COB 5x14 that I really like. The PowerTone is a great snare drum, and if you can get one in good condition for $150 then you really can't go wrong at all.
 

FFR428

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If you can find a 8 lug wood Tower snare those are still pretty good deals. Same shell as the Powertone just a different throw and butt. The Powertone swivo throw is a direct bolt on if you prefer that strainer. The Tower butt is a little wider bolt pattern though. Great snares! Don't limit yourself to Fullerton era drums. Cleveland and Dayton are also very nice unless your looking to buy a match for a Fullerton kit. This one was a gift from a very good friend. A keeper! :happy11:
 

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rhythmace

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Metal Powertones are Brass shells, and have a great all around sound. As Dan said, they give interesting harmonics with rim shots. They are not an "open" sounding drum, like a Supraphonic. Member, FloydZking didn't like that aspect of the metal Powertone, that I sold him. They are "contained." I now have a deep metal Powetone, and it is not "closed." I like it a lot better than my 5". Wood Powertones are different animals. They are very crisp and are high pitched. They put the word "snares" in a snare drum. Powertones come with 20 strand wires. Tower snares have 16. Most don't have the original wires anyway though. I have my 5" wood Powertone set up next to a 5.5" solid wood Maple DW snare, with 10 lugs. The DW sounds so much lower in pitch. All of the Rogers snares are high quality, throughout, and tune easily. As always, hear before you buy. Ace
 

tommykat1

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The Powertone is my favorite snare by a good margin. I have 5" and 6.5" Dayton COBs, and a number of 5" Cleveland wood models. My favorites are the early Cleveland 3 ply versions, though the later 5 plies sound good also. The COB models are cannons, especially the 6.5." The 6.5 is too much drum for most of the gigs I play.

My go-to snare for my 1967 Londoner 5 is a 5" Cleveland 3 ply blue sparkle. It's my favorite snare of the 15 I have, and that includes my Dynasonics, both wood and COB. Lately, I have been playing my Dayton 5" COB Powertone with my Gretsch Renown kit.

Why are these drums so great? First, they are 8 lug snares, and I think this is the single most important aspect of their wide open sound. IMHO, 10 lugs choke the drum, which is why I'm not a Dynasonic or Superten fan. They are too dry. The Powertone has a lot of range and depth from the center of the drum to the rims. Second, they have an incredible tuning range. You'd be hard pressed to make this drum sound bad, regardless of what your preferences for tuning snares are.

I got my first Powertone from Jollity Drum Farm a number of years ago. I remember opening the box and setting it up. From the moment I started playing, I had a huge smile on my face. And it wasn't even in proper tune with itself! It sounded even better after I tweaked it with new heads and a proper tuning. This is the one. My favorite. Has original wires, too:

Powertone Collage.jpg
 

troutstudio

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tommykat1 said:
The Powertone is my favorite snare by a good margin. I have 5 and 6.5" Dayton COBs, and a number of 5" Cleveland wood models. My favorites are the early Cleveland 3 ply versions, though the later 5 plies sound good also. The COB models are cannons, especially the 6.5." The 6.5 is too much drum for most of the gigs play.

My go-to snare for my 1967 Londoner 5 is a 5" Cleveland 3 ply blue sparkle. It's my favorite snare of the 15 I have, and that includes my Dynasonics, both wood and COB. Lately, I have been playing my Dayton 5" COB Powertone with my Gretsch Renown kit.

Why are these drums so great? First, they are 8 lug snares, and I think this is the single most important aspect of their wide open sound. IMHO, 10 lugs choke the drum, which is why I'm not a Dynasonic or Superten fan. They are too dry. The Powertone has a lot of range and depth from the center of the drum to the rims. Second, they have an incredible tuning range. You'd be hard pressed to make this drum sound bad, regardless of what your preferences for tuning snares are.

I got my first Powertone from Jollity Drum Farm a number of years ago. I remember opening the box and setting it up. From the moment I started playing, I had a huge smile on my face. And it wasn't even in proper tune with itself! It sounded even better after I tweaked it with new heads and a proper tuning. This is the one. My favorite. Has original wires, too:

Powertone Collage.jpg
I just love those Jollity drums in the woods shots . . . :)
 

tommykat1

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troutstudio said:
The Powertone is my favorite snare by a good margin. I have 5 and 6.5" Dayton COBs, and a number of 5" Cleveland wood models. My favorites are the early Cleveland 3 ply versions, though the later 5 plies sound good also. The COB models are cannons, especially the 6.5." The 6.5 is too much drum for most of the gigs play.

My go-to snare for my 1967 Londoner 5 is a 5" Cleveland 3 ply blue sparkle. It's my favorite snare of the 15 I have, and that includes my Dynasonics, both wood and COB. Lately, I have been playing my Dayton 5" COB Powertone with my Gretsch Renown kit.

Why are these drums so great? First, they are 8 lug snares, and I think this is the single most important aspect of their wide open sound. IMHO, 10 lugs choke the drum, which is why I'm not a Dynasonic or Superten fan. They are too dry. The Powertone has a lot of range and depth from the center of the drum to the rims. Second, they have an incredible tuning range. You'd be hard pressed to make this drum sound bad, regardless of what your preferences for tuning snares are.

I got my first Powertone from Jollity Drum Farm a number of years ago. I remember opening the box and setting it up. From the moment I started playing, I had a huge smile on my face. And it wasn't even in proper tune with itself! It sounded even better after I tweaked it with new heads and a proper tuning. This is the one. My favorite. Has original wires, too:

Powertone Collage.jpg
I just love those Jollity drums in the woods shots . . . :)
Ha! Yep, Trout, those pics are from Bobby Chiasson that I assembled into a collage. He includes them with every drum he sells.
 

RyanR

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rhythmace said:
Metal Powertones are Brass shells, and have a great all around sound. As Dan said, they give interesting harmonics with rim shots. They are not an "open" sounding drum, like a Supraphonic. Member, FloydZking didn't like that aspect of the metal Powertone, that I sold him. They are "contained." I now have a deep metal Powetone, and it is not "closed." I like it a lot better than my 5". Wood Powertones are different animals. They are very crisp and are high pitched. They put the word "snares" in a snare drum. Powertones come with 20 strand wires. Tower snares have 16. Most don't have the original wires anyway though. I have my 5" wood Powertone set up next to a 5.5" solid wood Maple DW snare, with 10 lugs. The DW sounds so much lower in pitch. All of the Rogers snares are high quality, throughout, and tune easily. As always, hear before you buy. Ace
Great response (no pun intended)! Thanks!

-Ryan
 

rhythmace

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100_0308.JPG Thank you too. My Rogers totem pole. I had a full blown case of DrumForum/E-bay/GAS. I bought 3 more before I got a grip. Ace
 

Titletown Tim

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Ace,

Would this be your definition of a snare roll?

Very nice! That green glass baby looks especially nice!
 

maxb2k

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tommykat1 said:
My go-to snare for my 1967 Londoner 5 is a 5" Cleveland 3 ply blue sparkle. It's my favorite snare of the 15 I have, and that includes my Dynasonics, both wood and COB. Lately, I have been playing my Dayton 5" COB Powertone with my Gretsch Renown kit.
I was expecting to see bread & butter lugs. When did Rogers move to the 5 ply shell lay up? Were most Tower model snares 3 ply?
Thanks
 

tommykat1

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maxb2k said:
My go-to snare for my 1967 Londoner 5 is a 5" Cleveland 3 ply blue sparkle. It's my favorite snare of the 15 I have, and that includes my Dynasonics, both wood and COB. Lately, I have been playing my Dayton 5" COB Powertone with my Gretsch Renown kit.
I was expecting to see bread & butter lugs. When did Rogers move to the 5 ply shell lay up? Were most Tower model snares 3 ply?
Thanks
Only some very, very early Powertones had the B&B lugs. Very rare.

The 5 ply shells came out in 1967 or thereabouts just before the move to Dayton. There are Cleveland 5 ply shells.
 

SwivoNut

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I drive a 21-piece big band every week with a COB Powertone and it's "get your kids off the street" awesome!!!
 

tommykat1

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SwivoNut said:
I drive a 21-piece big band every week with a COB Powertone and it's "get your kids off the street" awesome!!!
+1. I'm using my 5" Dayton COB Powertone with my Gretsch Renowns in favor of the 6.5 x 14 maple snare that came with the set.
 
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RickP

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SwivoNut said:
I drive a 21-piece big band every week with a COB Powertone and it's "get your kids off the street" awesome!!!
Swivo,
What batter head are you using on your COB Powertone for your Bog Band gigs ?
 


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