Seeking input from those who have played a N&C Alloy Classic snare

cochlea

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For the past 3 years I've been playing a 6.5x14 Craviotto snare almost exclusively. It can do so much that I ended up getting rid of the few other snares I owned, except for a vintage Ludwig Pioneer that is a perfect match for my 60's Ludwig kit. I recall reading an interview with Kenny Aronoff in MD many years ago where he said that every drummer should have, at a minimum, one wood and one metal snare drum. There are times when I'd like something a bit more bright and ringy than my Craviotto, so I'm contemplating picking up a metal snare. I really like the sound of aluminum snares but they often come across as "warm" and "fat," which my Craviotto does really well. I'm intrigued by the Noble & Cooley Alloy Classic based on the reviews I've read. I'm also enamored by the Noble & Cooley company, it's long history, customer service, and attention to detail. My question is whether the Alloy Classic will sound significantly different (which is what I'm looking for) than a solid shell maple drum? If so, which option would be better -- the 4.75x14 or the 6x14?
 

multijd

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I tried one years ago and thought it was the best snare Id heard up to that point. Very sensitive and with great tone. It was a bit expensive for me at the time but if I had the chance now I would very likely grab one. I tried the 4.75. I cant comment on a comparison to a single ply.
 

Neal Pert

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Yeah, it's definitely a pretty big contrast, though your choice of heads will play a role, too. But yeah-- if you tune them both the same with the same heads, it's a big contrast. Having owned both, I'd say hands down go with the 6 x 14. I liked the 4.75 but not as much-- it is the one Noble and Cooley I've owned that I thought didn't have a lot of tricks up its sleeve. Still a great drum, mind you.
 

cochlea

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When you mentioned bright and ringy, my first thought was brass not aluminum.
Yeah, that has been my thought all along but I want to rule in or rule out the N&C Alloy Classic before moving on to other options such as the Ludwig Black Beauty.
 

Neal Pert

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Following up: I mean, if you are hearing a Black Beauty in your head, get a Black Beauty. Don't get an Alloy Classic hoping it'll be a Black Beauty.

I also find that, for instance, the Yamaha Recording Custom Brass is really far away, sonically, from the solid shell maple drums I have
 

clowndog

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I own the Alloy in 4.75” along with a lot of solid shell snares. The Alloy is a great snare that is very precise with relatively quick decay. On the dryer, darker spectrum of metal snares. It is a chunkier thicker sound from a metal snare that can approach the sound spectrum of wood if tuned appropriately. Good news is it can also definitely sound like an aluminum snare so I love it’s versatility. Hope that helps.
 

MrDrums2112

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I have the 4.75x14 alloy classic and I love it (I have not played the 6x14 yet). It’s cast aluminum, and it’s a very lively drum. You can tune it up to the stratosphere, or it can go low and fat sounding. It is quite a contrast from the solid shell drums, though with the right heads it does sound “woody”. I really like the Evans EC1 Reverse Dot head on this snare, personally. You can find them used for a more reasonable price.
 

cochlea

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Following up: I mean, if you are hearing a Black Beauty in your head, get a Black Beauty. Don't get an Alloy Classic hoping it'll be a Black Beauty.

I also find that, for instance, the Yamaha Recording Custom Brass is really far away, sonically, from the solid shell maple drums I have
I'm not sure if I'm hearing a Black Beauty in my head or not, but if I were to pick up a metal shell drum, I don't want it to sound like a wood drum. I've read many a review of various metal drums that proclaim a "woody"quality. I would be looking for something that it is more "bright" with a definitive crack. I'm just curious if these are qualities of the Alloy Classic.
 

cochlea

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I'm not sure if I'm hearing a Black Beauty in my head or not, but if I were to pick up a metal shell drum, I don't want it to sound like a wood drum. I've read many a review of various metal drums that proclaim a "woody"quality. I would be looking for something that it is more "bright" with a definitive crack. I'm just curious if these are qualities of the Alloy Classic. It's so difficult to figure this out when there are no places nearby to try one of these out.
 

Ptrick

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I own the Alloy in 4.75” along with a lot of solid shell snares. The Alloy is a great snare that is very precise with relatively quick decay. On the dryer, darker spectrum of metal snares. It is a chunkier thicker sound from a metal snare that can approach the sound spectrum of wood if tuned appropriately. Good news is it can also definitely sound like an aluminum snare so I love it’s versatility. Hope that helps.
Started formulating a reply, this one covers it. Had a 6x14 for almost 20 years.
 

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