Shopping e-drums, your recommendations please?

cribbon

Very well Known Member
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
1,300
Reaction score
614
Nice set up wolfereeno, I dig the lights. And thanks for chatting about Reaper and the VST's too. I need to learn this stuff.

Anyway I've talked myself into the TD-27. I'm hoping I can swing it by Xmas or so.
Ian S,

I'm probably gonna get slammed by all the e-kit vets/experts here, but a couple of years ago, I was in exactly the same situation as you. I was an e-kit virgin, been an acoustic drummer all my life, never had more than a passing interest in electronic percussion and studiously avoided anything that plugged in or required power (I know zero about electricity except that I'm terrified of it). I just wanted an e-kit to practice on at home, didn't need nor want something to gig out with and wanted to keep it simple and cheap as possible.

My brothers-in-law have a zero-acoustic rock band (no amps, everybody direct in, including all guitars and e-kit) and needed me to fill in when their drummer quit, taking his mongrel e-kit with him. They're all very tech savvy guitarists and one of them went online to get some info on what they could get used that would fit their requirements. They were advised that a cheap and acceptable kit would be a used Roland TD9 (this is where I expect the derision to begin), so they found one online and bought it. I listened to youtube videos of guys going thru all the sounds and told them what sounds to use to make two user kits that would get us thru the gigs.

I had such a blast playing it live that I subsequently picked up another used TD9 for myself to use strictly as a home practice kit - it's nowhere near state-of-the-art anymore, but it's plenty good for what I (and you) want an e-kit for. Because of that, when I got it, I set it all up on a much sturdier Pearl rack and made the left side cymbal my ride and centered the hi-hat so I could use it to practice left-hand lead. The only upgrade I did was to get a KT10 pedal. Sure there are many more better sounding e-kits out there, but I do just fine with the TD9, which is basically like a dinosaur into today's e-drum world. It's fine for my needs, which are essentially yours.

The band's TD9 (extra tom pad & cymbal pad, conventional hi-hat stand)
PlanB-TD-9-001.jpg



My used TD9 w/ KT10
IMG_0132.JPG
 

jazzerone

Very well Known Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2006
Messages
534
Reaction score
168
Location
New Mexico
SACRILEGE!! SACRILEGE!! A TD-9!?! You've got to be kidding! What, they were out of Tupperware and storage containers at the store!? A TD-9??? You might as well go out and kill yourself right now...

On the other hand, I used a TD-10 for about 10 years before I finally retired it last month, and it was more fun than anything I ever paid $350 for, except that one time in Vegas, but that was back when $350 could get you.... well, never mind. Wrong forum...

Here's what me and every other e-drum snob in this place thinks: If you have been called to regularly sub in for Tony Royster Jr, you should probably invest in something better than the TD-9. If, on the other hand, you want to do what most of us do, which is sit under some headphones, put on some old Steely Dan and try to keep up with Steve Gadd, enjoying yourself without causing the neighbors to launch a missile strike at your house, then you should buy whatever you like and can afford.

The TD-9 was, and remains, a nice instrument, suitable for all manner of e-drum fun-having. The TD-10 has more drum kits on board, sounds better and costs more. As does the 20, the 30, the 50, the newly released 70 and the Mimic Pro.

Guess what? Ferraris cost more than Fords, but when you're sitting side by side on the 405 in a traffic jam, they're both going the same speed. Whatever that means.... you get my point.
 

Ian S

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2020
Messages
143
Reaction score
155
This is valuable discussion. Thank you so much.

I probably get carried away making excuses, and rationalizing jumping in at the mid-high end.

I've decided to wait until around xmas and pay down my CC a little more before purchasing anything, so I have some more time to study things and think it over.


I think for me the most important factor is reliable and accurate triggering. I'm willing to pay a bit more to avoid dealing with hot spots/machine gunning/unregistered strikes. There are other things I seem to be somewhat attached to as well, which are only available on higher end kits, so it's still the way I'm leaning. But same time it's worth stepping back to think, I'm not taking this e-kit to a stadium gig. It's really just for quiet practice at home, at least for the foreseeable future.
 

cribbon

Very well Known Member
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
1,300
Reaction score
614
SACRILEGE!! SACRILEGE!! A TD-9!?! You've got to be kidding! What, they were out of Tupperware and storage containers at the store!? A TD-9??? You might as well go out and kill yourself right now...

On the other hand, I used a TD-10 for about 10 years before I finally retired it last month, and it was more fun than anything I ever paid $350 for, except that one time in Vegas, but that was back when $350 could get you.... well, never mind. Wrong forum...

Here's what me and every other e-drum snob in this place thinks: If you have been called to regularly sub in for Tony Royster Jr, you should probably invest in something better than the TD-9. If, on the other hand, you want to do what most of us do, which is sit under some headphones, put on some old Steely Dan and try to keep up with Steve Gadd, enjoying yourself without causing the neighbors to launch a missile strike at your house, then you should buy whatever you like and can afford.

The TD-9 was, and remains, a nice instrument, suitable for all manner of e-drum fun-having. The TD-10 has more drum kits on board, sounds better and costs more. As does the 20, the 30, the 50, the newly released 70 and the Mimic Pro.

Guess what? Ferraris cost more than Fords, but when you're sitting side by side on the 405 in a traffic jam, they're both going the same speed. Whatever that means.... you get my point.
This is exactly the "e-god" response I was expecting, salted with some unexpected humor.
 


Top