Should a 5" solid wood snare sound Louder than a 5" Supraphonic

kenshireen1

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I always believed that the supra could cut through anything. Especially the Bonham model.
However, my 5 inch Nobley SS is louder and more piercing.
I know that steel and titanium are the loudest but I thought ludalloy was a close second.
 

JDA

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what top hoop are on each drum You can get pretty good crack out of a die cast irregardless of shell.
ahhh gretsch snare
 
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Elvis

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Supraphonic can be had with aluminim, brass or bronze shells, either hammered or not hammered.
Which Supra are we talking about here?
 

Fat Drummer

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Speaking just for myself... no, a solid single ply shell is going to always be louder than an Alumium Ludwig regardless of hoops (based on your stating it was "Ludalloy). I realize everyone's millage will vary, but solid ply snares are a world unto themselves.
 
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bellbrass

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That video was useful. Thanks for posting.
Just as I expected; I didn't think there would be much difference, and there wasn't. I think some materials, especially metal, "sound" louder to our ears, perhaps due to the harshness of the tone. And also, there's the dubious art of drum marketing: "Bell brass...the snare that will cut through walls of guitar amplifiers, so you can be heard...."
As the saying goes, "There are no loud snare drums, only loud snare drummers."
 

mpungercar

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That video was useful. Thanks for posting.
Just as I expected; I didn't think there would be much difference, and there wasn't. I think some materials, especially metal, "sound" louder to our ears, perhaps due to the harshness of the tone. And also, there's the dubious art of drum marketing: "Bell brass...the snare that will cut through walls of guitar amplifiers, so you can be heard...."
As the saying goes, "There are no loud snare drums, only loud snare drummers."
Agreed. I think most of the perceived "loudness" has more to do with the frequencies emitted from a particular drum than the actual volume of that drum.
 

kenshireen1

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what top hoop are on each drum You can get pretty good crack out of a die cast irregardless of shell.
ahhh gretsch snare
NC has their own DC hoop.. It is noway as heavy and thick as the gretsch...Supra has the classic TF
 

kenshireen1

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Supraphonic can be had with aluminim, brass or bronze shells, either hammered or not hammered.
Which Supra are we talking about here?
Ludalloy 400. I also have a HH bronze which I have not tested since it is 6 1/2
 

kenshireen1

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only if it's silver sparkle..................
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?? don't understand comment
 

backtodrum

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I have maple snares and two Ludwig 400 and 402 supra's and they by far are louder than any maple snare I own. It interests my how your maple snare is so much more cutting and louder that your Supraphonic.
 
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Hop

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That video was useful. Thanks for posting.
Just as I expected; I didn't think there would be much difference, and there wasn't. I think some materials, especially metal, "sound" louder to our ears, perhaps due to the harshness of the tone. And also, there's the dubious art of drum marketing: "Bell brass...the snare that will cut through walls of guitar amplifiers, so you can be heard...."
As the saying goes, "There are no loud snare drums, only loud snare drummers."
Agreed. I think most of the perceived "loudness" has more to do with the frequencies emitted from a particular drum than the actual volume of that drum.
I'd argue that there is an over simplification that one shell material is "louder" than another. I believe there is a relatively small percentage of the shell that would influence the total volume produced. However, I think the percentage would increase when we try to account for the overall tone produced - but not much more. The head is the most critical component to the drum, followed by the bearing edges . We could make reasoned arguments for the descending influences of rims, sticks (mass, velocity, etc.) , shells, hardware, etc., but I'll stay shell centric.

inter-webz said:
What is resonance? The reinforcement or prolongation of sound by reflection from a surface or by the synchronous vibration of a neighboring object.
What is a resonator? An apparatus that increases the resonance of a sound, especially a hollow part of a musical instrument. A resonator is a device or system that exhibits resonance or resonant behavior. That is, it naturally oscillates with greater amplitude at some frequencies, called resonant frequencies, than at other frequencies...
The shell acts as a resonator, it either reflects or absorbs a portion of the energy generated by striking the head and is thus responsible to for affecting tone. As it absorbs some of the energy and colors the tone it can be incorrectly perceived as a change in volume as mpungercar and bellbrass state above. The video clearly shows that there is little difference in volume produced between striking shells sizes and materials. It think if the video creator used an "Iron Byron" device, like that used to test golf clubs, to strike the drums we would see an even smaller delta in dB between the shells

Snare_SPL.JPG
 


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