Should I save up to buy my dream drumset, even if the finish isn't in good condition?

NoMotivationDrummer

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Hey all!

(This is all theoretical BTW)

My dream drumset is an 80's TAMA Superstar in the aquamarine lacquer finish. I would absolutely KILL to have one of these drum sets, I almost don't care about the sizes. Problem is: They're somewhat rare and are REALLY EXPENSIVE. I'm talking $500.00 for a floor tom in okay condition. I really want to get my hands on one, but the only listings I've seen are for a 16x16 floor tom and a 16x14 floor tom. I also saw a listing for a full 3 piece (14, 18, 24), and it was WAY cheaper than buying the drums individually. ($900.00 + plus $150.00 shipping)

So I have a question: How does someone, with no stable income (I'm 14), possibly afford their dream kit when they are this expensive? I am also worried that with time, the kit will become harder to find in good condition and even more expensive! I have wanted one of these kits since I saw a listing.

Does anyone have any advice on how to bear the weight of being obsessed with a kit while being a kid with Tourettic OCD, Tourette's, and having problems on fixation,
 

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Squirrel Man

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I was industrious at your age, I had two paper routes and a Sunday church stand and at 15 I bought my first car with my own money.

I guess that's my recommendation, be industrious.
 

dtk

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I worked for my dad...he lent me the money...
 

mebeatee

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Well your scenario has probably been played out by everyone on this forum and will continue on forever so welcome to the club!!!! The line between wanting and needing can be very blurry at times and may be a blessing or a curse...;)
Here's a different take....emit good karma and use your power of will. The instruments will find you. The only thing that doesn't change is yeah things get expensive....but that's relative.
Some examples....
It took 2 tours of Canada to find a cymbal I wanted. I didn't "need" it per se but "wanted" it bad. When I was actively looking it was elusive and then in a casual conversation with someone...the cymbal just appeared....
For a couple of years I was looking for a certain kite that was no longer made...when I took a step back from the search 2 appeared online within one week so I scooped one.
A 26" bass drum...more or less on permanent loan...now resides in my living room....this from good karma.
At 16 I borrowed money from my parents to get (at the time) my dream kit.....a double set of silver sparkle Ludwig's (which I still have some 50 yrs later, among the other "dream" kits). I was very very fortunate to be able to pay them back as our little combo at the time had gigs every weekend as I recall.
The cool thing is you have a goal....which is quite paramount.....good on ya!!!
bt
 

lossforgain

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Short answer: yes.

Saving is always a good idea, because you need to have the money you want to use to buy the thing you want. As someone else already said, you may even change your mind as time goes on and find a new “dream set” to run after. My tastes have changed a lot since I was 14, which is about when I started drumming. But in any case, start saving. That way when you do decide on a set, you’ll be ready. And keep saving even after that! Having money in reserve is the best way to live.
 

A.TomicMorganic

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Short answer: yes.

Saving is always a good idea, because you need to have the money you want to use to buy the thing you want. As someone else already said, you may even change your mind as time goes on and find a new “dream set” to run after. My tastes have changed a lot since I was 14, which is about when I started drumming. But in any case, start saving. That way when you do decide on a set, you’ll be ready. And keep saving even after that! Having money in reserve is the best way to live.
This.
 

Houndog

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Have you played any of these drums to know that’s what you want ?
 

mfk252

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Short answer - the sound is the most important thing. Buying a used kit that has seen some mileage doesn't change that fact and often you can get something extraordinary at a price you can afford.

The Tama Superstars are high quality drums. I still gig with one Superstar kit, record with the second and rehearse with a third. None of them will win a beauty contest but since the shells are still round and the edges are true they hold their own in the sound department.

If I scratch any of them you can't really tell and it just becomes another part of that drum's story.

Save buying the quilted exotic wood drum kits for when you are much older and can afford them.
 

levelpebble

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So I don't know if I'm going to be tormenting you or encouraging you.

Aquamarines are out there; I would say 'highly uncommon' rather than rare. I have an original bop kit, 8x12 14x14 14x18, that I've successfully added to over the years. Got an 8x8 last month from Australia; here's a pic showing the color match with the 10 and 12 toms. Hard to match, as some are green and some are blue. They are worth finding. But then again so are all vintage superstars, especially in standard depths.

FB vintage tama groups will be a good resource for you.
 

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Polska

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Since I was in my 20's I wanted a candy apple red kit. Almost had one but missed it by 2 weeks. Then I saw ______ finish, loved it and bought it. Then I saw ______ finish, loved it and bought it. I'm 57 and still haven't owned a red kit. Obviously you have to like the finish, but you also need to like the sizes, the brand, the wood and the price. I'd keep your eyes and mind open. You'll surprise yourself.
 

laporte48

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I bought these Superstars new in 1980 and they are still in perfect shape and are great classic drums. My advise is to consider the mahogany or maple finish which are more available and affordable. Seems like the aqua marines were rare even in the '80's.
 

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Ludwigboy

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I was industrious at your age, I had two paper routes and a Sunday church stand and at 15 I bought my first car with my own money.

I guess that's my recommendation, be industrious.

At 14, I did exactly what Squirrel Man did; I also had 2 paper routes and saved the money for a beat up pieced-together Stewart/MIJ set .. I wanted a 60's Ludwig Oyster black pearl set but didn't have the money ; I also bought my own car (a 69 Pontiac convertible) just shy of 17 with the 2 papers routes and a part time job at a gas station.
It is great that you have a goal to get this kit ...I don't know if you have a part time job or not...but if you don't...this goal may spurn you on to get a job; you will also appreciate the kit more when you pay for it with your own money ... good luck :D
 

OldSticks

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Hey all!

(This is all theoretical BTW)

My dream drumset is an 80's TAMA Superstar in the aquamarine lacquer finish. I would absolutely KILL to have one of these drum sets, I almost don't care about the sizes. Problem is: They're somewhat rare and are REALLY EXPENSIVE. I'm talking $500.00 for a floor tom in okay condition. I really want to get my hands on one, but the only listings I've seen are for a 16x16 floor tom and a 16x14 floor tom. I also saw a listing for a full 3 piece (14, 18, 24), and it was WAY cheaper than buying the drums individually. ($900.00 + plus $150.00 shipping)

So I have a question: How does someone, with no stable income (I'm 14), possibly afford their dream kit when they are this expensive? I am also worried that with time, the kit will become harder to find in good condition and even more expensive! I have wanted one of these kits since I saw a listing.

Does anyone have any advice on how to bear the weight of being obsessed with a kit while being a kid with Tourettic OCD, Tourette's, and having problems on fixation,
Remember, we listen to drums, when the player is good, not because he's playing a good looking set, but because he's a skilled player. ! I would much rather listen to a tremendous drummer on a crappy, rusted set, than listen to a mediocre drummer on a beautiful set. Control what you can. Right now you don't have much control over your money. That's OK, you're 14, that will change. 2 things you can control are practice time and effort, and "dreams". Keep dreaming, and PRACTICE! If you practice 60 min/day, increase to 2 hours, 3 hours is better. I practice at least a hour a day, sitting on a rug on a tile floor (my "practice pad"), in addition to anytime playing the set. Some days I don't play the set, but I seldom miss a day "on the floor". I believe I've learned fundamentals, and gained more skill and stability playing on the floor than I have on a set. I got my first "set" in '64. My older brother bought me a cheap, used bass drum and snare, so I'd quit playing his saxophone. I bought one used set after another, each one a little better than the last, and practiced. It's not the drum set, it's the drummer. In 1980 I ordered my dream set. Think of drumming as a process that improves with your practice. If you continue to practice and dream about being a good drummer, you'll get the drums you want in 5 years you might learn there's a set you like even better than the Tama. All these things can change in time. One thing that won't change: you'll never be a great drummer if you don't spend the time and effort to practice and learn. Trust me, if you're a great drummer playing a so-so kit, you'll get a lot more interest than a great set with a so-so player. To play, you need good musicians that want to play with you because they're interested in how you play. I've got a touch of OCD. It presents some difficulties, but I try to obsess on fundamental skills. I can lock on a beat or a fill, and obsess on it till it's MINE. Meanwhile, save and save, because nobody's giving away good drum sets. Dream and practice to become a really good drummer, and the rest will come together for you.
Much love, and practice, practice, practice. Keep a kind heart inside you, and the other issues really don't matter. If anybody doesn't like you because of Tourette's, that's their problem, keep on keeping' on. They probably won't make a good friend for anybody else, either. JM
 

boomstick

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As some others have said, your "dream kit" may well change before you know it. When I was 15-16, I bussed enough tables to buy mine, but sold it in my 20s. I sometimes think about jumping back in time and telling my young self: "No, don't buy that kit. Buy this one!" and I'd still be using it today.
Does anyone have any advice on how to bear the weight of being obsessed with a kit while being a kid with Tourettic OCD, Tourette's, and having problems on fixation,
To echo what OldSticks was getting at above, I would try to refocus that obsessive energy on your practice/playing. Do enough of that, and you might end up making any kit sound awesome.

If you need to channel that energy in a gear-related direction, maybe think about getting an affordable kit and trying to get the best possible sound you can out of it. Experiment with head choice, tuning, different snare wires, different mounting options. Also really focus on your kit setup, getting everything into optimal positions. There is great satisfaction to be found in getting a lower end kit to sound and feel amazing, and after all that experimentation, your "dream kit" might be something else entirely.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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At 14, I had a CB700 junky kit, a Tama snare, a set of junky Zildjian hats and an 18" crash ride. It was okay but I didn't know better.
As I've become an adult, I own plenty of dream kits now. But I've worked hard for it.

My suggestion is 1) find a rich uncle, 2) get a paper route, 3) sell everything you have if you really are serious, or 4) just deal with it being a dream and in the meanwhile build up your chops and get better until you get more $$.
 


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