SHOULD I UPGRADE FROM Yamaha RC TO N&C

Dan Felix

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Hi everyone.

I am in a quandry and could use some feedback.

I have some NC snares and have hankered after a Horizon series kit for some time. Can't get them here down under; so naturally I can't try one in person. But several seasoned pro's, whose opinions I hold in high esteem, have told me they are the best drums they have played and recorded with.

So. What are you thoughts on selling a 2011 cherry wood Japanese RC (22x16, 10x9, 12x10, 14x14, 16x16) and using the funds to move into NC? Excellent condition yada yada....

I have played RC since 1995 and feel a change is needed from the all birch thing ( I am not a serial drum flipper). The only thing that I have felt compelled to sell them for is NC Horizon. I recently played some Craviotto shells in NYC but, sweet as they were, did not feel the call or urge to buy them. The only lure is the NC.

I play in and record jazz, rock, country and blues genres mostly. My other kit is an old 60s keystone which I will not be parting with!

Ok. Give me your knowledge and thoughts on the RC vs N&C question.

D
 

drawtheline55

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I have 2 RC kits and totally enjoy them but also have other kits and like them a lot, have never owned N&C but by all accounts they are top flight drums.
Have you had a chance to play them ?
and welcome to the forum.

Ben
 

Mn02

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You'd be going from high end drums to high end drums, so I doubt you'd be disappointed. The bigger difference will be the tone of maple as opposed to birch and probably more standard sizes (which may be beneficial in terms of comfort of positioning). Years ago I went from a 90s era recording custom to a mid 2000s Ludwig classic maple and size and sound was really the biggest driver and benefit. I loved the ease of positioning 107 and 128 rack Tom's and the boomy tone of maple was very refreshing after 20 years of playing birch drums.
 

DanRH

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Calling Mr Treviso and Junior! Ive never owned an N&C kit but have owned a few RC kits and currently own a newer version. They aint goin nowhere! Ive also owned two Craviotto kits and they are wonderful BUT, I no longer have them. To me, just too expensive a kit to take to a gig where other musicians are bumping into them all night. Also, Im just playing cover tunes, so...
Dont get me wrong, I have many real nice kits but N&C and Craviotto? For me, no.
 

zenghost

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I own a N&C Horizon kit and can relay a few observations.

N&C is one of the best drum companies to work with on spec'ing and building a drum kit. They provide very personalized service and are open to ideas and input on the build - Nick Jones and crew are truly exceptional in that regard.

N&C also affords you a wide choice of sizes and finish options, which is very nice compared to more restricted options from larger operations.

The N&C Horizons are nicely built drums with great attention to detail. They sound great, I perceive them as being a tad warmer (some type of "mahogany" provides the inner shell ply) and fatter in their sound profile compared to most kits I've played. The shells are Keller-supplied to N&C's specs. I do not find the Horizons to be superior in sound quality or profile to any of my other kits (Sonor beech, Jenkins-Martin spun glass, and Craviotto in mahogany and walnut) - just different - but I doubt they would disappoint anyone.

N&C has the best RIMS implementation in my opinion with their under the lug attachment points, which eliminates most of the annoyance of RIMS. Their Cool-mount tom brackets are cool, not a must-have by any stretch, but a neat idea. It would nice for N&C to have their own floor tom leg brackets and bass drum spurs, the generic ones they use are perfunctory, but not up to the level of the drums they are producing and consequently cheapen the kits in my opinion.

The hardware on the N&C kits is not my favorite and likely my biggest gripe. The lugs have delrin inserts that can be overly restrictive on the tension rods if you prefer to macro tune by feel like I do (and micro tune by ear), or simply prefer a more freely spinning drum key when changing heads. The inserts were ridiculously tight on my Horizon bass drum, which turned a simple head swap into an unexpected pain. This may or may not be much of an issue for you. I don't swap heads frequently by any means, but the N&C "tune-safe" implementation is not nearly as nice as Sonor's in my opinion.

That being said, N&C is a great company making great drums with options and customer service that exceeds most other companies. The Horizon series drums are an under-rated value for a higher-end kit as you get a lot for your money that goes beyond the drums themselves.
 

Murat

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Quality wise, you are going from a great set to another one. Sound is the main difference in my opinion. Horizons with the Maple/Mahogany combo is going to be way warmer than the Birch you are used to with its somewhat reduced mid range and boosted highs .

Funny thing is, an RC and a Horizon pretty much covers every recording and live situation I can think of ! I know that gets expensive though :)
 

MrDrums2112

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Noble & Cooley is my favorite drum company. I have a CD Maple kit that I use for everything from community theater gigs and jazz to rock. I have several snares, ply, solid shell, and alloy. I have no complaints, and cant see myself ever playing anything different, with the exception of vintage drums. And as others have said, their customer service is top notch. Good luck with the decision!
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

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Id go N&C.

Especially since youre dealing with power toms. The RCs can be nice, but IMO in live settings, no better than many of the current top end kits by Tama, Pearl, and Yamaha. No one in the audience cares if its a rare kit. They just care about the sound, and if they can be heard!
 

ludslingerwig

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apples and oranges. personally, i'd try to hang onto the apple if you can. you'll regret it later if you don't. IMO

also i would not classify the change if you do as an upgrade. just a different flavor
 
R

RickP

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I owned a Yamaha PHX kit and currently own the Noble and Cooley Horizon. The Yamaha PHX are fabulous drums, but the N&C Horizon kit fits my drumming wants better. The Horizon has lighter weight shells, is warmer sounding and holds its tuning better than any kit I have ever owned. They are resonant warm drums that have a great tuning range. I am especially fond of the bass drum sound. These are my all time favourite drums . They impress me every time I gig with them and my bandmates specifically ask me to bring this kit out.

The quality of build on the Horizon kits are very well done and the inner ply of mahogany and the mostly horizontal grain plies in the shell combine to provide a unique sounding set of drums.

79206113-D6C9-4B9F-BD32-EE7E2FE0D79F.jpeg
 

Dan Felix

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Thanks to everyone for chipping in. Perhaps my thread title was not right - hard to upgrade from the RC - rather it's a change of flavour I'm seeking and the maple/mahogany NC might turn out to be my new cornflakes!

Think I'll hold off until I get to the US again early next year and go play up to one in Massachusetts.

Thanks again!
D.
 


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