Singing Drummer Mic Stand

Thumper

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I use an articulating arm mount, like what radio talk shows use. Mounted on hi hat stand with an accessory clamp.
 

Rockin' Billy

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I bought a really nice Countryman Isomax headworn cardioid mic at the 2000 NAMM show. It sounds great and was totally liberating, but the bleed from snare and cymbals is significant. Soundmen used to complain to me constantly, and I eventually got tired of hearing it. I reluctantly went back to a stand mounted SM57.

Just over 3 years ago, I was hired by a nationally touring Chicago tribute and have been required to sing on every song. The drumming is busy and all over the place, and being tethered to a stand mounted SM57 was a pain in the ass. I considered going back to the headset, but at one of our gigs (at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City) back in 2018, the tech had set up a Shure Beta 56a as my vocal mic. I had never seen one used as a vocal mic (toms and snare, sure), and the tech said, "Oh yeah, drummers love these". Man, was he was right! I loved it and immediately bought one, which I use exclusively now.

The 56 has changed my life as a singing drummer. It's tiny and routes the cable at a right angle from the capsule, along the mic stand. With a typical SM57 or 58, the mic itself is 6 1/2" long, and then the XLR connector and the cable is another 3" or 4". Even if you use a right angle connector to knock off a couple of inches, it's still an impediment, and many times I've hit the mic or the cable with a stick, dropping a few sticks along the way. I was always very conscious of it being in the way. To deal with this, I would end up keeping it angled off to my left side, and having to turn my head to sing. The 56 allows me to put the mic right in front of my face, and nothing sticks out or gets in the way. I've never hit it once, and it seamlessly integrates into my setup. From a drumming standpoint, I'm not even aware that it's there. It's the next best thing to a headset mic. I highly recommend it.

Hope this helps,
Chris


View attachment 482164
Yes! Exactly what I use as well.(mic)
 

TonyVazquez

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I can't get used to mic stands anywhere near me while I play and sing backup vocals in my band.
At rehearsal it's not much of a problem, because our living room space is small and I can choose
to use a mic or just shout my vocals into the air.

Whenever I have used a mic boom stand, I positioned it 90 degrees to my left ("9 o'clock")
so I'm signing directly to it while not seeing my kit as I play it.
Sometimes it works for me, but most times it gets in my way or distracts me while
I'm busy doing some syncopation.

Any mic and stands booming or hovering near me or over my face above me
just gets in my way. I move around a lot on my kit, including head-banging and hair-whipping.

During a live show, I tend to smack the mic with a stick or with my face, because I tend
to go "Animal" all over my kit with reckless abandon.
I'm thinking of investing in a Mic head-set that I can wear on stage during a show.

In the studio, I tried using a mic boom stand during the recording of my band's CD,
but the mic (an SM57) was picking up the snare as though the mic were an "overhead",
thus it sounded like a distorted "crack" in my vocal track.
We were recording live to 2-track stereo (with instruments going direct, and my drums
were mic'ed in a separate drum room).
So then, our studio engineer suggested that I do without the vocal mic and just sing out
into any of the drum mics and overhead mics in front of me.
Good call, because of course I was getting my "Animal" off on the kit during the recording
session - and so getting a good drum take was more important to me than my backing vocals.
My drum tracks turned out perfect, and my vocals Within the drum tracks didn't interfere
with the drum sounds; my voice sounded further away in the "background". A good mix.

If I weren't moving around so much on my kit I wouldn't mind the traditional mic boom stand.
Otherwise it just gets in my way.
 

latzanimal

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sptucker

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Another vote for the Beta 56A. I use it on a boom stand with a gooseneck, attached to my throne using a cool device called a Clamp-It. It's never in the way, but when I'm not singing (maybe 30% of a gig), I can easily swivel it from in front of my face. I burned through 3 CM-311s before settling on this setup about 5 years ago. CM-311 works ok, but it catches a lot of cymbals and snare and breaks if you look at it funny. The 56A is built like a tank and sound guys love it.

Not sure if you can find a Clamp-It anymore, but it's worth looking for. Here's what it looks like:

https://uedata.amazon.com/Clamp--Drummer-Mic-Stand-Holder/dp/B00H387CNK
 

jmcohen

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You guys sold me! I found a “Customer Return”, and therefore used, Shure Beta 56a on ebay. It looks like new. Bought it. I’ll try it on a standard boom mic stand first and go from there.
 

drums1225

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You guys sold me! I found a “Customer Return”, and therefore used, Shure Beta 56a on ebay. It looks like new. Bought it. I’ll try it on a standard boom mic stand first and go from there.
I think you'll like it. When I was using an SM57, I would set up a standard boom stand to my left and slightly behind me; let's say at 7 or 8 o'clock. Then I would raise it up pretty high, and angle the boom down toward me at around a 45 degree angle, so it was never in the path of my sticks. It's really not necessary with the 56a. I keep my stand at 9 o'clock and the boom is close to horizontal, angled very slightly downward.

Let us know how it works out for you!

Chris
 

bpaluzzi

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For my rehearsal kit, I use my main Latchlake Mic King stand with an extra arm and swivel clutch hanging off of the horizontal boom that is holding my stereo overhead. It’s absolutely perfect, and I wish I could find something show-portable with the same performance. Unfortunately the big counterweight is both what makes the LL a pain to carry around AND what actually makes this possible. Harumph:)
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89224160-1B25-492D-BF7B-807B4FD3293F.jpeg
 
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vintagedrummersweden

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I use a Shure SM58 on a boom stand, placed low on my left side slightly behind me, pointing upwards.
Pretty uncomfortable but works for the small amount of backing vocals I provide, and doesn't get in my way since I'm quite "extrovert" with my arm movements...
 

phdamage

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i sang and played drums in a band that toured pretty heavily for 10 years and tried many different things. best for me was boom coming down over my left shoulder (i play right handed) with mic pointed at me, parallel to the floor. a little off to my left was best. it made me over to it just ever so slightly to sing, but made playing without singing less obtrusive. should note, i probably sang around 30% of the time - shared vocal duties with guitarist.

i've seen a million different things. headsets always seem ridiculous to me. aside from looking a bit silly, they have the added disadvantage of loudly capturing all huffing and puffing after songs. they're also always (almost?) condensers, which are far more sensitive, so lots of added bleed. i do have a friend who plays with just a simple, straight stand sticking up between his legs, just in front of the snare. unsure if i'd do it, but seems to have the smallest chance of failure while playing - no drooping boom stands, and not too much bleed.

from a sound perspective, ideally you want the back of the mic pointed straight at your snare, but this is totally in the way for most players.
 

swarfrat

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I look at mic stands and think - I know I need to spend more than I have, but I'm not buying a $500 mic stand and I don't want to spend $130 and find I just bought a fancier piece of junk and you have to spend $xxx instead. Also - it doesn't seem like a reliable heavy duty mic stand should cost thought much. Especially for the home studio where lots of weight/overbuilt is perfectly acceptable/desirable.
 

RobbiefromAtlanta

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16B47C42-F69F-480F-9D76-BD1CF57AD588.jpeg


I use a 3 legged boom mic stand with a goose neck attachment. I use a Shure Beta 56a with a special mic cable that has an on and off switch built in.
 

tnsquint

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I always used a standard steel base mic stand with a boom and gooseneck coming straight over my head. I added a weight lifting base to the stand base so no worries about falling over and not requiring me to carry a single really heavy mic base.

The caveat was that I disabled the vertical clutch on the stand and instead added a memory lock to the upper section so I could, very easily push the mic out of the way and bring it back with no resistance at all. The entire boom would just swing out of the way.

The 56 is a great idea by the way.
 

CherryClassic

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View attachment 482879

I use a 3 legged boom mic stand with a goose neck attachment. I use a Shure Beta 56a with a special mic cable that has an on and off switch built in.
Exactly: I don't sing but in an old forum some one was having trouble with stability problems and I suggested this same arrangement and for more stability using a long DW Doggie Bone Arm mounting the mic stand to the vertical pole of his throne. He said it worked and liked it.

Just a thought,
sherm
 

aparker2005

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Beaufords swinging boom mic he knocks around with his stick is the coolest drummer singing mic I've seen.
 

jmcohen

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I have been practicing with the Shure Beta 56a all week and it seemed fine, but wanted to try it out with the boys in the band before I reported back to you.

Today we practiced and it sounded on par with my SM58. I am a mediocre singer at best, but have vocal parts in 80% of our tunes, so it has to at least make me sound no worse than the ‘58. That is a huge success in my book. The mic is very unobtrusive and does not pick up my drums or cymbals at all.

I used a lightweight mic stand and it definitely won’t make the cut. I listened to you guys and have the mic stand over my left shoulder. Because the stand is lightweight I don’t have the boom extended very far. This resulted in me whacking the stand with my tambourine. I’ll order one with a metal base for stability and I’ll be set.
Now I just need to practice my singing so I don’t sound like Bob Dylan impersonating Tom Petty with a head cold.
Thanks again for the input.

Josh
 

MillerMav

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Beaufords swinging boom mic he knocks around with his stick is the coolest drummer singing mic I've seen.
My dad who plays left hand on a right kit (like Beauford) and has been doing so for IDK 65 years or so always had a mic setup like Beaufords with a overhead and gooseneck. I think because when they play their chest is open it makes that positioning easier. Eventually I would like to figure out a way to mount an INDe BR3 to my floor tom and get a goose neck overhead thing going off of that. But I don't do a lot of singing in my band at this time.
 

kallen49

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I played over a hundred bar, banquet and wedding gigs between 2010 and 2019, sang lots of harmony and one to three lead vocals per night, (including “Wicked game”, “Honky Tonk Woman”, “Shut up & Dance”and “Sledgehammer”). I use a Shure SM58 with a switch (usually left mic on all the time as my overhead amplification while always using a bass drum mic and sometimes a 3rd snare/hats mic).

I use a typical tripod mic stand, custom trimmed the boom to an exact length,
always with a gooseneck, coming from over the top of my head,
never needed weights because the ever changing stage dimensions dictated that my mic stand could sometimes be on my left but sometimes on my right. Gooseneck stays attached to my mic stand.
Most important advice I can offer;
I always carry a spare gooseneck in my hardware bag for gigs that supply the P.A. Inexpensive insurance.
 


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