Six Lugs, Eight Lugs, or Ten Lugs?

JohnnyVibesAZ

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Just by going on all the comments I've read here, it looks like 6 or 8 lugs are best for wood snares, and 10, and 12 lugs work best with metal snares. It's all about personal taste, though.
 

Drumstickdude

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I love it when this comes up it actualy gives me something to talk about on here! Anyway Who says there's no vintage radio kings with 10 lugs?!..........though would this have been called a radio king or an artist model?
 

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Drumstickdude

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It has 10 lugs, a solid shell, early niles serial number 5604, three point strainer but no bridges, normal standard but plate? I cant say if I notice that much difference in sound to my 40s Krupa 8 lug radio king.
 

Masecar

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Its just one factor though, isn't it? I think I prefer 8-luggers overall but IMO a Black Beauty or a Supraphonic doesn't quite sound like a BB or a Supra unless it has ten lugs.

Most of my snares have ten lugs, but the '59 Radio King and Dunnett Titanium are my current favorite snares, and they're both 8.
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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I love it when this comes up it actualy gives me something to talk about on here! Anyway Who says there's no vintage radio kings with 10 lugs?!..........though would this have been called a radio king or an artist model?
I don't think the Artist snares had solid shells, but they were still a nice drum. Mine had 8 lugs. I ruined it, playing in a LOUD cover band, and delaminated the shell, which made it toast, unfortunately.
 

Drumstickdude

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I don't think the Artist snares had solid shells, but they were still a nice drum. Mine had 8 lugs. I ruined it, playing in a LOUD cover band, and delaminated the shell, which made it toast, unfortunately.
They had a solid shell in 63 and 63 mines a 63 I'm sure. I'm interested to know exactly how your drum got ruined just by playing loud?
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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They had a solid shell in 63 and 63 mines a 63 I'm sure. I'm interested to know exactly how your drum got ruined just by playing loud?
Didn't know that about solid shell Artists.

I was recruited to play in a pop/rock band after just doing the jazz thing in high school. The drums never had mics, so I had to slam above the very loud amps. All I could do to survive was to get some very thick 3S model marching sticks, and slam the snare as hard as I could. After one summer of gigs, my big sticks looked like corn cobs, and I noticed a buzz coming from inside the snare shell. I took the batter head off and noticed that the shell had delaminated. The innermost play was blistered from the rest of the plies. I painted the inside of the shell with an oil-based paint my dad had, thinking that would save it, but too late. It was finished. I decided to buy a ten-lug Krupa Chrome Sound King, and to this day, was the best snare I ever owned, until a janitor knocked it over in the band room at college, and caved in the shell, right at the snare butt. Now you know 'the rest of the story!'
 

Drumstickdude

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Didn't know that about solid shell Artists.

I was recruited to play in a pop/rock band after just doing the jazz thing in high school. The drums never had mics, so I had to slam above the very loud amps. All I could do to survive was to get some very thick 3S model marching sticks, and slam the snare as hard as I could. After one summer of gigs, my big sticks looked like corn cobs, and I noticed a buzz coming from inside the snare shell. I took the batter head off and noticed that the shell had delaminated. The innermost play was blistered from the rest of the plies. I painted the inside of the shell with an oil-based paint my dad had, thinking that would save it, but too late. It was finished. I decided to buy a ten-lug Krupa Chrome Sound King, and to this day, was the best snare I ever owned, until a janitor knocked it over in the band room at college, and caved in the shell, right at the snare butt. Now you know 'the rest of the story!'
Yeah, I know the feeling of not being miked up trying to compete on volume with those damn guitar players! ive had loads of that, it's not so good for your technique either, I still find it difficult to play quiet. Ouch! What a nightmare for that artist snare, and the sound king I would want to kill him!
 

Iristone

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I feel that 8-luggers are easier to tune, while 10-luggers stay in tune better. Maybe it's because both my 8-luggers have vintage spring-loaded lugs and my 10-lugger has modern nylon-threaded lugs. It's not that easy to control variables in music :wink:
 

Seb77

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I feel that 8-luggers are easier to tune, while 10-luggers stay in tune better. Maybe it's because both my 8-luggers have vintage spring-loaded lugs and my 10-lugger has modern nylon-threaded lugs. It's not that easy to control variables in music :wink:
With fewer lugs, there is more pressure (at a given tuning) on the single t-rods; not sure if this leads to faster de-tuning or the opposite. I don't think the way the lug inserts are mounted matters here, the kind of inserts does though (for example some older Sonor inserts).
 

itsjjp

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Eight is great! Yes, the original Radio King has 8. 8 is all that is needed on a 14" drum. Yes, any more takes away some resonance. Some like that sound, some prefer a drier more controlled sound. 8 luggers hold their tune as well as 10 luggers in my experience. As for 6 luggers, I have always avoided those as those were typically student models and definitely don't hold tuning sufficiently on a 14" snare.
 

Ajbambino

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I think the difference in lugs is easy to pick out from a 6-lug vs an 8 or 10 (or even 12).

But the 8 vs 10 or even vs 12 is hard to pick out unless you're recording the snare and doing a side by side comparison (which even then, good luck having the same snare in all the different lugs).

If I had to put a preference I do think 8 lugs sound more livelier and resonant than 10 lugs. That, and I prefer tuning 8 lugs than 6, 10, or 12 lugs snares.

There was a previous statement about 10 lugs staying in tune longer than 8, and I can agree with that somewhat since pressure from the rimshots would be spread more equally across the lugs. Same with getting a more uniform sound on the 10 vs 8. You have more nodes to make it equal.

That being said, I have a 6, a few 8, a 10, and a 12 lug snare. My preference in drum in lugs is 8 but my favorite snare is the 12 lug since it's my baby.

It's the LP 8.5x14 Bronze Banda Snare (they stopped making the bronze and brass shells for this so I especially love it). Definitely something unique and wild and can crack like crazy - but relatively unknown as far as I know.
 

Monday317

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I was reading that the classic sound of the Radio King snare has eight lugs and not ten lugs. Maybe the extra two lugs "restrict" the resonance? It seems that eight-luggers are worth more than the "Super" Radio Kings, these days. I'd like to hear your thoughts on the number of lugs with ply shells, other wood material, and metals. How about twelve-lug snares? I know some of you have it down to a science.
This is a question not worth obsessing over IMHO; there's a video on the question at the YouTube Sounds Like A Drum channel that examines the issue pretty well. More lugs basically = more even tension on the rims and reduced shell resonance. For example, an Acrolite is generally less dry sounding than a Supraphonic.

For toms, small (up to 13" diameter) generally do fine with six lugs or less and should sound open and resonant. As you go to 14"-18" hanging/floor toms 8 or more lugs may be needed to separate boom from rumbling thunder--again, all a matter of the individual drummer's taste. For instance, my 10 & 13 hanging toms sport 6 lugs each (both ends of course), where my 16 is fitted with 9 lugs each end.

Up to a 22" bass drum, 8 lugs are OK. After that, I advocate 12.
 

gra7

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I think more lugs give a more focused less resonant sound on smaller drums - but in my experience 10 lug snares seem to hold their tuning better especially when tuned higher
 

FlowTom

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I reconfigure marching snares for use as drum kit snares and those are usually 10 or 12 lugs.
8 lugs is my comfort zone for a 14" snare. But 6 will get the job done if needed.
So when I tune a snare with 12 lugs, I mark the top of every other tension rod with a Sharpie.
I bring the head up to tension and pitch with 6 of the lugs, then bring the rest of the lugs up to equal tightness.
It saves a lot of chasing pitches around the hoop.
 

Ncrhythmman

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I like 10 lugs up & down on my 14" snare drums & 8 on my 13s....
Seems more Solid to me & the newer 8 lug 14s are usually a cheaper model.
 

lossforgain

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I enjoy both 8- and 10-lug snares, though if I have a choice I have tended toward 8-lug drums. My Summit snares are 8 lugs because that's what I chose, and it works well with the solid shells. Extra lugs would just put unnecessary weight on the shell.

Strangely, I recently had an 8-lug Black Beauty and found that I preferred the 10-lug sound on a brass Ludwig. The 8 was fine, but for some reason the 10s just made me happier. I kept a 10-lug clear brass Super in place of the 8-lug BB.

In 6-lug drums, my best experiences have been with Ludwig Pioneers. I am a huge fan of vintage Slingerland drums, but I have never met a 6-lug Slingerland that I enjoyed playing. And while it might be true that the sharp edges on Rogers shells help make the 6-lug Luxor snares more usable, I still find the tuning a bit squirrely. So if I had to play a 6-lug snare, I would pick a Ludwig. But I don't have to, and haven't kept any that I have owned in the past.
 

Sven62

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8... 10... I think the thing that makes the most difference in sound is metal vs wood... roundness of the shell... bearing edge quality and angle... Those things will affect the sound much more than number of lugs. JMHO
 


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