Slingerland bass drum leg suggestion

BEBdrummer

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I recently purchased a 1970’s Slingerland Kit with a 24” bass drum. It only has the two front bass drum legs and they are hard to work with, i.e. they don’t tighten down so easily and stay in place. The back legs have been removed as well as the brackets. Any suggestions for good replacement legs or other advice? I gig with this kit and I’m more interested in functionally vs. historical accuracy.
 

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K.O.

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The brackets strip out. The solution is to put in steel threads via devices called helicoils. You could do it yourself or take them to a machine shop to do. Once that is done the factory spurs should work pretty well. Not quite as well as modern spurs but not bad. Finding another set to put back on would help as well. You might be able to find a stripped out set for a reasonable price then get all four helicoiled and you're good.

Historic accuracy is one thing but resale value is another. If you plan to keep the set forever then that doesn't matter but if you ever go to sell the set then having drilled it for modern spurs could have a significant impact on what you could sell them for (and Slingerlands tend to be undervalued to begin with). They are your drums but that is something to keep in mind. New spurs and other mods might increase the functionality greatly but such things tend to impact the value negatively in a significant way. Anyone willing to pay top dollar is going to want things as original as possible. If they are already "player grade" due to other mods then have at it.
 

CSR

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Jim Petty makes exact replacements:
 

Rich K.

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You could also take the mounts you have and re-tap them to a larger thread and use aftermarket wing bolts. Since yours are stripped already, you won't be doing any damage.
Also, INDE makes a spur replacement setup that you may be able to use the existing holes from the Slingerland spur mounts.
 

K.O.

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I don't think the Inde setup will work on the slingerland style mounts because of how the holes are oriented.

The problem with these is that the steel T-bolts are threaded right into the pot metal brackets and over time the harder steel wears away the zinc casting. If you just retap it for a larger bolt you just start the same process again. The helicoil solves this because it is a threaded steel insert that taps itself into the existing hole ( once drilled out to the correct size). Once done you have steel on steel threads and nothing to worry about. Also it looks original. I bought a set of Slingerland spur brackets at the last Chicago show and didn't even realize they'd been repaired with helicoils until I looked at them very closely a few weeks later. I was actually glad that was the case since that means my worries are over for this set of spurs.
 

drumgadget

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I don't think the Inde setup will work on the slingerland style mounts because of how the holes are oriented.

The problem with these is that the steel T-bolts are threaded right into the pot metal brackets and over time the harder steel wears away the zinc casting. If you just retap it for a larger bolt you just start the same process again. The helicoil solves this because it is a threaded steel insert that taps itself into the existing hole ( once drilled out to the correct size). Once done you have steel on steel threads and nothing to worry about. Also it looks original. I bought a set of Slingerland spur brackets at the last Chicago show and didn't even realize they'd been repaired with helicoils until I looked at them very closely a few weeks later. I was actually glad that was the case since that means my worries are over for this set of spurs.

A good example of a part that should have had helicoil inserts when originally manufactured. This is a cost issue, and certainly not limited to drum hardware ..... although our hardware is particularly susceptible to thread stripping because of rough treatment (over-tightening) and the crappy, brittle pot metal used in the castings. Helicoils are ideal for fasteners that are tightened/loosened over and over, but not necessarily too tightly. The insert really does not increase the net tensile strength of the thread, but does greatly improve durability.

Mike
 

CaptainCrunch

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Also, FWIW, a memory lock of some kind or even just a humble hose clamp will take a LOT of pressure off those screws, helicoil’d or not. Slingy simply asked too much of their bass and FT mounts in the first place. Ludwig Rocker spurs (well, a good portion of them) are basically the same as Slingy and suffer the same ills.
 

Rich K.

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Jim Petty makes exact replacements:
Petty screwed me on a set of Slingerland spurs... can't recommend dealing with this guy.
I think the OP need brackets, not spurs.
 

Rich K.

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I don't think the Inde setup will work on the slingerland style mounts because of how the holes are oriented.

The problem with these is that the steel T-bolts are threaded right into the pot metal brackets and over time the harder steel wears away the zinc casting. If you just retap it for a larger bolt you just start the same process again. The helicoil solves this because it is a threaded steel insert that taps itself into the existing hole ( once drilled out to the correct size). Once done you have steel on steel threads and nothing to worry about. Also it looks original. I bought a set of Slingerland spur brackets at the last Chicago show and didn't even realize they'd been repaired with helicoils until I looked at them very closely a few weeks later. I was actually glad that was the case since that means my worries are over for this set of spurs.
yes, the helicoil is a much better solution. I bought a kit and did it myself, but it wasn't so easy as the inside isn't open ended and I had trouble breaking off the end piece (if you have a helicoil kit, you'll know what I mean). If you're handy or can have a pro do it, it makes them better than original.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I have a 70's 14x24 bass - I pound it hard (but only in the house, not gigging) and it has yet to move. It has 4 brackets but only 2 legs (in front)......hmmm.....

I agree with K.O. re: keeping it original vs. drilling, but if you are willing to drill new holes, the Gibraltar folding spurs work well. I don't think that drum/kit is going to be a vintage collector's item soon, though. The Gib. legs are a bit heavy, but they should hold your bass drum and about $40. Look around....I put a link below....

If you're playing mystery gigs with slick floors, I'd consider getting a basic carpet, too (under $20 at Home Depot) and adding velcro to the bottom of your bass pedal, as once it's clamped onto the hoop, the weight of the kit will anchor the rug and the bass won't move as the pedal velcro will be attached to the rug, too.

 

rpludwig

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just do the helicoil and be done...do the same on your bass drum cymbal bracket and floor tom leg brackets...couple hours on the bench and move on...2 cents.
 

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