Snare Sound in a Practice Room Environment

kenshireen1

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My practice room is12x12 in my basement.
It is a finished room with wall to wall rug.

I play a 1960 supra... I have a washcloth spread out over the top head and changed the head from an ambassador to an Evans RC dot.
My "problem" is as follows:
When I play without any musical ear plugs the snare sounds HARSH. (it is well tuned)
If i use my musical ear plugs the snare and bass sound GREAT...obviously it is cutting out some of the high frequency decibels.

However, if someone comes in the room to listen they aren't going to have ear plugs.

Is there anything I can do to tone it down a bit?
 

rondrums51

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You'll figure something out, maybe some Drum Clips or some other muffling device.

Charlie Watts once said that drums are an acoustic horror because they sound so different in every room. We all deal with it on every gig we play.

I like Drum Clips. You can use one or two, depending on how bad the room is.
 

mtarrani

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You'll figure something out, maybe some Drum Clips or some other muffling device.

Charlie Watts once said that drums are an acoustic horror because they sound so different in every room. We all deal with it on every gig we play.

I like Drum Clips. You can use one or two, depending on how bad the room is.
As bad as drums are, pianos are worse. The pianist for whom I play in one band has to deal with house pianos and to add to that variable is how different each room is. Some are very lively with hard floors sans carpet with hard walls that bounce sound in every direction. The worse thing, though, is having the piano directly (or close to directly) under a ceiling fan. The oscillation and air movement wreak havoc with notes.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Not sure why an early Supra (COB?) sounds harsh. Even with that head (I'd go coated amb. over amb. snare side) and it being properly tuned, it should sound great, especially if COB.

What are the walls & ceiling made of (and how high is the ceiling)? Also you can get a bag of disposable ear plugs for dirt cheap for any "guests".....
 

kallen49

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I make muffle rings out of old heads, about 2” wide, use that on the snare,
I have access to sheets of discarded mylar at work so I cut them into circles for each Tom, reduces volume and saves wear on the heads. You could use old heads for this too.
 

kzoosteve

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Invest in room dampening...makes a huge difference....I have Auralex Bass traps and panels....Auralex is pricey but works well IMO...even the cheaper stuff will do wonders for you.

Steve
 

pocketwave

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Invest in a Yamaha EAD10. Your kit will sound like a professional drum tech set it up. Plus awesome features for practice.
 

cornelius

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Square rooms are really tough - it might help to treat the room some more...
 

bconrad

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Bass traps before carpet (DIY is better than Auralex, IMO). Strategic use diffusers and mid range frequency absorbers.
 

Mcjnic

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Feral cats ... their little furry bodies absorb an amazing amount of higher frequencies. And they’re fun to watch.

I kid.

I agree with the disposable ear plugs. Cheap. Plentiful. And sanitary.
 
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polycrescendo

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Or perhaps treat the ceiling if you haven't already. I have egg crate foam on the ceiling of my practice pod, it works pretty well.
 

hefty

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The the biggest problem I have with ear protection / plugs/ headphones what have you, after wearing them everything sounds harsh. It could just be your ears.
^This. And conversely if you play without ear protection first your ears kind of get "broken in" (for better or for probably worse) and things won't sound harsh. A good solution on a number of levels is to just always play with ear protection. Also the Yamaha EAD is awesome for practice as someone already said.
 

DanRH

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Personally I’m in the “Supras sound harsh” camp. I love my Ming Pure 6.5 in my studio. Of course, opinions are like... well, you know. I also agree with the EAD comment if you want consistent sound.
 

ThomFloor

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Square rooms are really tough - it might help to treat the room some more...
Exactly, you need to tame your room, not your snare. I bet the snare sounds great in a large club room or outdoor stage....after all its a Supra. It also comes with a muffler which helps a lot to fit the room you're in.

Blankets along walls, especially the wall behind and in front of you. Some foam here/there. How your drums are arranged helps too, if they are more in center of room than the corner. In such a small room its wise to wear ear protection anyway, whomever is listening.
 


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