Snare wire problem

TonkaDrummer

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Just got my first black beauty snare. Wow, what a beautiful instrument. BUT...I'm having snare issues.

I've experimented with various tensions on the strainer and checked the tuning on the snare-side head. It's even and tight. Seems like I'm getting a lot of "after rattle" if that makes sense. The snares appear to be intact, nothing is bent or warped, and they're seating properly.

What gives?

Is this just such a "live" drum that I'm going to get that? Any recommendations on how to better diagnose or correct the problem?

Thanks!
 

shuffle

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Tighten your resno tight.
Kiss the snarewires after you make sure they're set up evenly on the head.
About all ive got
 

DanRH

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Keep in mind snares are meant to buzz. It's always been there...unless it's a rattle where something is loose and not just plain snare buzz. Also, I use Grosgrain ribbon (5/8" inch) instead of the plastic strips. I don't mess with cord.
 

varatrodder

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Tell me more about cord... more responsive? flexible? quicker?
It allows the snare wires to sit straight with less effort. With plastic strips or grosgrain ribbon you have to ensure the wires are set up perfectly straight since the straps restrict any side to side movement. With cord, you can disengage the throw, wiggle the snares around until they're fairly straight, and then when you reengage the throw they will self align.
 

Seb77

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It allows the snare wires to sit straight with less effort. With plastic strips or grosgrain ribbon you have to ensure the wires are set up perfectly straight since the straps restrict any side to side movement. With cord, you can disengage the throw, wiggle the snares around until they're fairly straight, and then when you reengage the throw they will self align.
With the angled endplates Ludwig uses, cord also pushes the wires up against the head. Creates a crisper sound at lower volume and lower wire tension.
 

Deafmoon

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Is the snare side head old? May be time for a new one. I believe a snare side head is 3mil thin, that can be stretched out over time. I just was tuning one I had on the snare for about 2 years and the dang head pulled out from the hoop. So, you put on another snare side head. Tune the heads up the way you normally would and then detune each tension rod surrounding the snare bed, butt side and throw off side, by half turn each. You can play with this after the wires are on. Definitely use cord, not strap. Gibraltar, Ludwig, Canopus all make great cords for wires. I shy away from thin cable like Purecussion Wires use, those crease at the bend and no longer pull correctly over time. Once you have the wires laid even, turn the throw off adjustment knob to as open as possible. This will give you adjustments to pull the wires when engaged. Once even and the cords are attached. Engage the throw off and tighten the knob as needed. Be careful not to choke the wires to the drum. Once you have it set place it with the kit and go from there tuning up or down on the surrounding snare bed lugs. If you still cannot get rid of the buzz, you may have sympathetic tuning amongst some other drums. This gets more involved as you need to find out where its coming from and have to work each tom to the bass drum individually. This usually means a complete kit retuning as well cause if you tune your tomes in fourths or thirds apart, addressing sympathetic tuning usually means you just changed those intervals.
 

Ron_M

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What varatrodder and Seb said. Using cord will change the endplate angle for the better so the wires will have better contact across the ss head. At least that’s my experience with Ludwig snare drums.
 

Philaiy9

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I just went through something similar with my lm402. Besides the tuning fixes others are recommending, 16-strand Puresound equalizers also helped cut down on the rattle. I tried changing to cord instead of straps but it didn't make any difference to my ear.
 

TonkaDrummer

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The head is new and tight, this drum is factory new. Cord sounds like it's worth a shot. I see that it's readily available at GC and other places.

Thanks for the input!
 
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Drumbumcrumb

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Best bet is the 10 yard length of Ludwig cord for $10. Enough there for many snare drums, and many wire changes and it’s the best cord IME.

16 strand wires are worth a shot. The best wire/cord combo I’ve found is the German type wires that have a little notch for the cord, and the blue (or orange) Ludwig cord.

When I get a drum from the manufacturer and it’s got the after buzz you describe, I just strip it down and start from scratch instead of going crazy chasing down the culprit. (The culprit is poor factory tuning, but there’re too many variables to tackle singly)

Take off the wires and both heads, reseat the heads and tune them up evenly. Reinstall the wires being careful to keep them centered at tension, and being pulled evenly/square. You may have to tweak the reso head tension up or down to make the snares play nice, but I don’t get into any of the backing off certain rods etc. Now you’ve got a head out of tune which causes its own set of issues. Different snare beds and edges act differently, each drum has a setup that it “likes”, you just have to find it!

Kenny Sharretts has tuned more snares than I’ve had hot breakfasts, you could do a lot worse (I think this is a C batter/F or G reso tuning. Relationship between heads changes snare wire behavior as well)
 

Seb77

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Not sure if this was mentioned: take a look at the soldering of the wires. Sometimes it's flawed, and some wires don't sit flat on the head or don't have the same tension as the rest. If that's the case, you need to replace the wires (I have returned wire sets becuase of this).
 


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