SO, after re-wrapping vintage drums. . .

Old Dog

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I'm curious if you all choose to use a blade/exacto type knife to cut out holes. OR, do you drill. These old shells are very dry (vintage Premiers from the mid 60s) and not brittle, but I don't want to damage them.

BTW, this is Precision Drum wrap this time around. If I used Bum wrap, I would probably just use a blade.

I'm not sure which is technically "easier" to me---using a blade vs. holding a drill. I have some arthritis in my hands, and they DO get sore when I do this work.

Thanks everyone
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Drill from the inside out. I put blue painters tape on the outside to help not splinter or crack the wrap. You can use a bit a tad smaller than the hole so as to hit the shell.

Did you wrap it yourself? Each time Pr. has wrapped a drum for me, they drilled the holes, too.
 

K.O.

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I use a step bit drill. I poke a small awl thru from the inside to mark the holes then drill from the outside. The bit will push in on the wrap that isn't supported from underneath and center itself into the existing hole. You just have to make sure you only push the bit thru to the correct diameter of the original hole.

This is the system I've arrived at after years of experimentation. I just did another shell the day before yesterday with perfect results....anyhow, it works well for me.
 

Old Dog

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Drill from the inside out. I put blue painters tape on the outside to help not splinter or crack the wrap. You can use a bit a tad smaller than the hole so as to hit the shell.

Did you wrap it yourself? Each time Pr. has wrapped a drum for me, they drilled the holes, too.
I did wrap the drums myself. I've found I have a knack for it, just using HIGH QUALITY double sided tape. I enjoy the work believe it or not.

Yeah. A blade seems a little risky...
Yes, I was not perfect by any means when cutting holes into the bum wrap. I would cut "Xs" then "carefully" cut around. The blades I had at the time dulled WAY too quickly. Made it difficult.

I use a step bit drill. I poke a small awl thru from the inside to mark the holes then drill from the outside. The bit will push in on the wrap that isn't supported from underneath and center itself into the existing hole. You just have to make sure you only push the bit thru to the correct diameter of the original hole.

This is the system I've arrived at after years of experimentation. I just did another shell the day before yesterday with perfect results....anyhow, it works well for me.
I may try a step bit. I did buy a set last year that I have. The problem is, these are 50+yr old Premiers that DO NOT belong to me. My best bro's first kit as a kid 40 some odd years ago. I just don't want to mess anything up.


Thanks guys. I had not yet drilled from the outside. I will probably do a combo of your suggestions here. THANKS!!!
 

thin shell

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I use an appropriately sized brad pont bit from the inside. Works great and no need to poke a hole first. The edges of the bit slice through the wrap unlike a standard twist drill so there is very little chance of tearing the wrap. I don't like the idea of drilling anything from the outside. One slip and you have a nice scratch or cut in your new wrap.

I like step bits but don't like using them for many things on drums. You have to be very careful when you punch through. Go just far enough for the next step's edge to hit the surface and you can accidentlally enlarge the hole. I did this once redrilling a jagged hole I was going to plug. It put just enough of a bevel around the hole to leave a ring around the plug.
 

Old Dog

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I use an appropriately sized brad pont bit from the inside. Works great and no need to poke a hole first. The edges of the bit slice through the wrap unlike a standard twist drill so there is very little chance of tearing the wrap. I don't like the idea of drilling anything from the outside. One slip and you have a nice scratch or cut in your new wrap.

I like step bits but don't like using them for many things on drums. You have to be very careful when you punch through. Go just far enough for the next step's edge to hit the surface and you can accidentlally enlarge the hole. I did this once redrilling a jagged hole I was going to plug. It put just enough of a bevel around the hole to leave a ring around the plug.

THANK YOU! I like the sound if this approach better. I was certainly worried about a slip and scratch scenario from the outside. :blink: :banghead: I have pretty decent brad points I've been using for drum work anyhow. Awesome.

I will simply be slow and careful.
 

amosguy

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I use a step bit drill. I poke a small awl thru from the inside to mark the holes then drill from the outside. The bit will push in on the wrap that isn't supported from underneath and center itself into the existing hole. You just have to make sure you only push the bit thru to the correct diameter of the original hole.
Step drill in a hand tap holder will prevent going overboard and cutting the hole larger. I use a hand held tapered reamer from the outside for holes up to about 3/4", depending on the reamer. Cuts the wrap without damaging the shell.
 

idrum4fun

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I use an appropriately sized brad pont bit from the inside. Works great and no need to poke a hole first. The edges of the bit slice through the wrap unlike a standard twist drill so there is very little chance of tearing the wrap. I don't like the idea of drilling anything from the outside. One slip and you have a nice scratch or cut in your new wrap.

I like step bits but don't like using them for many things on drums. You have to be very careful when you punch through. Go just far enough for the next step's edge to hit the surface and you can accidentlally enlarge the hole. I did this once redrilling a jagged hole I was going to plug. It put just enough of a bevel around the hole to leave a ring around the plug.
I also use brad-point bits. I have plenty of wood scraps available to keep underneath the shell when drilling, which also helps to promote nice clean holes through the wrap. I've had Precision wrap many shells for me in the past and have them NOT drill the holes...simply because I want the fun of doing it myself! Yeah, it's included in the price, but I really like doing this myself! And, if I'm being honest, Precision chamfers the holes, while I prefer a nice clean cut without a chamfer. Just my personal preference!

-Mark
 


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