soft drumming vs hard drumming

BoHuggabee

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i don't necessarily mean volume here. hard drumming is improv style, play with your ear, don't really follow a specific structure, rhythm, and/or repetition. hard drummers, either clash or pull off some cool timings, rhythms, and whatever else. soft drumming caters to the idea that a song should follow a structure, and be consistent. i consider neil peart to have been a softer drummer because of what he could really do behind drums. he was always reserved and catered to the structure, or the idea of what a song should be. joey jordison being a hard drummer, that most of his older work wasn't catering to any standardized structure but what he created, and formed. a song can either be the same point repeated, or like a story where you have a start to an ending. drummers have to know how to express their talents, while knowing what the music requires. so when one balances hard, and soft styles, you get unique characteristics that are adherent to standardization. this is where tasty drumming is created.
 

Vistalite Black

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I get it. It's like soft punctuation vs hard punctuation, with the first being characterized by a lack of capitalization, even to start a sentence, and lots of commas in run-on sentences. Hard capitalization insists on proper usage. Sentences are short. I prefer hard drumming and punctuation!
 

BoHuggabee

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I get it. It's like soft punctuation vs hard punctuation, with the first being characterized by a lack of capitalization, even to start a sentence, and lots of commas in run-on sentences. Hard capitalization insists on proper usage. Sentences are short. I prefer hard drumming and punctuation!
where did this last month go so fast?
 

RIDDIM

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i don't necessarily mean volume here. hard drumming is improv style, play with your ear, don't really follow a specific structure, rhythm, and/or repetition. hard drummers, either clash or pull off some cool timings, rhythms, and whatever else. soft drumming caters to the idea that a song should follow a structure, and be consistent. i consider neil peart to have been a softer drummer because of what he could really do behind drums. he was always reserved and catered to the structure, or the idea of what a song should be. joey jordison being a hard drummer, that most of his older work wasn't catering to any standardized structure but what he created, and formed. a song can either be the same point repeated, or like a story where you have a start to an ending. drummers have to know how to express their talents, while knowing what the music requires. so when one balances hard, and soft styles, you get unique characteristics that are adherent to standardization. this is where tasty drumming is created.
I read that 4 times and still don't understand what you mean.
 

dirtysicks

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I read that 4 times and still don't understand what you mean.
Hard drumming= more improvisation, going in an out of time signatures and rhythms, more intricate setups to changes in the music playing "extras" (a la Dave Weckl, Todd Sucherman, Eric Moore, Chris Cole, Vinnie, etc.)
Soft drumming= playing for the song, more structured, mapped out and consistent, same show every time type of drumming (a la Steve Gadd, Bernard Purdie, Ringo, Charlie Watts, Peart, etc.)
 

Tornado

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Bo, is this a real term, or is this something you made up? I've never heard of hard/soft drumming outside of dynamics.
 

dcrigger

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Hard drumming= more improvisation, going in an out of time signatures and rhythms, more intricate setups to changes in the music playing "extras" (a la Dave Weckl, Todd Sucherman, Eric Moore, Chris Cole, Vinnie, etc.)
Soft drumming= playing for the song, more structured, mapped out and consistent, same show every time type of drumming (a la Steve Gadd, Bernard Purdie, Ringo, Charlie Watts, Peart, etc.)
Two thoughts -

1. I don't think arranging all of these elements into two camps makes any sense. It's not like any of these elements sit at one end or the other of some yardstick - labeled Free, Complex, Improvisatory, Busier at one end and Structured, Simple, and Pre-determined at the other. There is music and drum performances that are Free, Simple and Busy. Or ones that are totally highly Pre-determined, yet demand lots of improvisation. Or totally Improvised, yet Simple. And on and on. It just not that simple.

2. And why "Hard" and "Soft"? Why not "Orange" and "Chewy"???? Hard and Soft are words that actually mean something. Sure hard can mean difficult - but that doesn't make soft mean easy.

But mainly - i just don't see the point to trying to sort all of this into two boxes. I really don't see how any musical enlightenment, understanding or clarity comes from doing that.
 

dirtysicks

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Two thoughts -

1. I don't think arranging all of these elements into two camps makes any sense. It's not like any of these elements sit at one end or the other of some yardstick - labeled Free, Complex, Improvisatory, Busier at one end and Structured, Simple, and Pre-determined at the other. There is music and drum performances that are Free, Simple and Busy. Or ones that are totally highly Pre-determined, yet demand lots of improvisation. Or totally Improvised, yet Simple. And on and on. It just not that simple.

2. And why "Hard" and "Soft"? Why not "Orange" and "Chewy"???? Hard and Soft are words that actually mean something. Sure hard can mean difficult - but that doesn't make soft mean easy.

But mainly - i just don't see the point to trying to sort all of this into two boxes. I really don't see how any musical enlightenment, understanding or clarity comes from doing that.
To be honest, it happens all the time on the forum. Some just super simplify it and call it groovers vs choppers lol.
 

supershifter2

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Been playing since 1970 and never heard of such as soft or hard. Oh never mind.

I play what I think fits the song. Some songs like lots of fills and some songs dont. That called > feel , groove , in the pocket , etc.
 


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