Sonor SQ2 - Birch, Beech, or Maple?

Steech

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Or this one
$3100 is an incredible price. I keep looking at them. Wait. I’m confusing it with a different listing, this one is a lot more than $3100.
 
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dingaling

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I would get 8, 10, 12, 14FT, 16FT in heavy beech and bass in 18+22 and snare in 5+6.5 in thin maple. Not sure about finish.
I can’t stand that fake rosewood so I’d probably get a painted finish. Not sure of color, they do amazing sparkle finishes too. I saw a green sparkle designer that was amazing.

I think much like a car, the minute you take ownership the resale value would be lowered quite a bit as it’s custom to what you want so make sure it’s your forever kit.

These are so expensive I can’t afford one unless I sold most of my vintage kits to fund one, which I’m not totally against but not right now.

One of the great thing about Sonor’s are the undersized shells. I think that’s their magic.
 

peter

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...something else to consider when getting inner and outer veneer… it counts toward the total ply count; meaning that a thin beech shell is 2 ply veneer and 2 ply beech. ALPI is the majority of the finishes and that’s made from poplar. That means your thin beech shell is half poplar...
View attachment 531331
I was taking a closer look at the chart you referenced, and it's actually a bit worse than that:

A thin shell with both inner and outer veneer is actually only 1/3 the wood you have spec'd. Or, an even more depressing way of looking at it is that only 1 out of the 5 mm total thickness (snare/toms) is birch/beech/maple. At least there are minimum two veneers which are real wood; scandi birch (the best one of all IMO), and silky oak.

Happily, Sonor does the finest, most tasteful sparkle lacquer finishes I've ever laid eyes on :)
 

Steech

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Since it takes a year to get them, you should probably make up your mind pretty soon. hehe
Or look for a used one that gets you the closest to your dream config. And then ask if you can do a payment plan :).
 

T_Weaves

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Or look for a used one that gets you the closest to your dream config. And then ask if you can do a payment plan :).
I got mine used (barely) and they got here in 8 days! SWEEEEET! not bragging........... (maybe a little) hehe
 

Steech

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I got mine used (barely) and they got here in 8 days! SWEEEEET! not bragging........... (maybe a little) hehe
Nice! That’s the way to do it. Sonor actually does produce a small number of kits based on the most popular configs and sells them to dealers specifically for the purposes of quick sales with zero wait, so if you’re looking for say a medium maple or beech in standard sizes you can get one from Sweetwater etc in a week vs waiting for your own custom kit for at least 7-12 months.
 

peter

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Just one more thing from the configurator... when selecting shell thickness, Sonor says:

"Do you want a full, mellow tone with high volume? Then a medium or heavy shell is for you. If you prefer more brilliance and great flexibility in sound then a vintage or thin shell is recommended."

While a full, mellow tone, and high volume is fairly easy to climb... What on earth do they mean by "brilliance and great flexibility in sound"?

My understanding is that a thinner shell will sharpen the attack, and lower the preferential tuning range of the drum. This hardly seems to be best described as "brilliance". Plus, some have said that the vintage shells have a more limited tuning range where the toms respond optimally, so I assume the "flexibility" they're referring to does not have to do with tuning range.

Any guesses from those with thin and/or vintage shell experience?
 

storsav

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"Flexibility" may mean any head will sound pretty good pretty easily.
"Brilliance" maybe means resonance. I could see how thin shells with higher tuning on the heads will really have some overtones and speak quickly.
 

Steech

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Just one more thing from the configurator... when selecting shell thickness, Sonor says:

"Do you want a full, mellow tone with high volume? Then a medium or heavy shell is for you. If you prefer more brilliance and great flexibility in sound then a vintage or thin shell is recommended."

While a full, mellow tone, and high volume is fairly easy to climb... What on earth do they mean by "brilliance and great flexibility in sound"?

My understanding is that a thinner shell will sharpen the attack, and lower the preferential tuning range of the drum. This hardly seems to be best described as "brilliance". Plus, some have said that the vintage shells have a more limited tuning range where the toms respond optimally, so I assume the "flexibility" they're referring to does not have to do with tuning range.

Any guesses from those with thin and/or vintage shell experience?
Thin shells have a wider tuning range, a more open sound, more resonance, but less volume and attack/punch. Vintage shells supposedly have more volume and attack due the reinforcements, but I have heard that this is not true and that they are muddier than any of the other shell types. You’d get a lot of the benefits of the thin shells with medium shells plus more attack, presence, and volume, with slightly less of a tuning range.
 


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