Sound proofing the FLOOR of a practice space?

drummers_need_coffee.exe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2019
Messages
121
Reaction score
33
Location
Burlington, Vermont
I'm hoping to rent out a space to practice with some friends downtown where I live. The price is right, it's in a great location in town, and has good space. The landlord is open to it being used as a music playing spot.

The thing is, it's above a tea house. I'm thinking that the best way to ensure our new landlord's continued support is to avoid complaints from our neighbors. To that end, I plan to put up noise-cancelling foam on the walls and maybe ceiling. But the floors could be tricky, especially considering the business right below...

Rugs can only get us so far... I was thinking about a raised platform for the drums, and packing it full of noise cancelling foam? Anybody have some suggestions or experience here?
Thanks!
 

Tmcfour

DFO Veteran
Joined
May 23, 2008
Messages
2,266
Reaction score
526
Location
Philadelphia
Yep, building a floating floor is the best way. Air space is the best way to sound proof anything, you are trying to combat sound waves so depending on the wave form you have to do different things. The tennis balls is a great idea I hadn't heard of before. You need to isolate the floor you are set up on from the floor underneath it as much as possible to eliminate vibrations transfering from one surface to the next. Another good way to isolate for sound proofing is staggering 2x3s and using insulating foam sheets (pink bubbly looking material that comes in a roll and is about 3mm or so thick) to back the 2x3 where it is resting against the surface it is nailed to.... eh, I hope that makes sense it would be easier to explain with a picture. Haha
 

dtk

DFO Master
Joined
Oct 6, 2005
Messages
8,334
Reaction score
324
Location
Needham MA...
You might also look at that foam flooring they use around ice rinks. It should absorb some vibration but the floating floor seems like a great idea....might also be good to talk to the Tea House and see if they'll let you know when they're dead hours are/closing...and that they should come to you before the land lord for quicker resolution...
 

amosguy

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,236
Reaction score
269
Location
Redmond, WA
Gonna need more than putting the drums on an islation pedestal. Bass guitar wave forms will be hard to isolate as well. Unless you do a full coverage floating floor of some type, it would be a waste of time. Sealing around the edges against the wall will be critical. As an engineer pointed out to me for one project, it only take a small hole in the hull to sink a boat.

Any common heat vents will also provide a path for sound.
 

gwbasley

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Messages
2,692
Reaction score
303
Location
Holiday, Florida
Many of the 60's and 70's studios were built with a 2X4 or 2X6 riser filled with sand, depending on how much weight the floor joists could handle.
 

blueshadow

Just Shuffling along
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
13,133
Reaction score
991
Location
North of Austin, Texas
Playing after normal business hours is obviously going to be the best way to
avoid complaints from neighboring establishments
such as the Tea House.
That won't cost you a dime.
I think this is the answer, mostly the other stuff you're talking about will help with how the room sounds and might help with some of the vibrations but the sound will still make it's way downstairs.
 

dcrigger

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
5,221
Reaction score
1,334
Location
California
I think this is the answer, mostly the other stuff you're talking about will help with how the room sounds and might help with some of the vibrations but the sound will still make it's way downstairs.
exactly - as foam product do next to nothing in blocking transmission of low frequencies. A low frequencies are going to be the main thing that bothers your downstairs neighbors. And keeping those low frequencies out of the buildings shared structure is significantly difficult... meaning very expensive.
 

JazzDrumGuy

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
8,023
Reaction score
1,091
Location
Pebble Beach, CA
I agree with Snappy. We used to rehearse in a pizza parlor. We waited until it closed (typically Fri. @ 10PM) and then set up and would jam all night long. Yeah, it was the 1st floor, but still, in a somewhat residential neighborhood, we never got complaints. The cops never hassled us either......all was good.
 

drummers_need_coffee.exe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2019
Messages
121
Reaction score
33
Location
Burlington, Vermont
So some good news... did some sleuthing. The space (which I'm not checking out in person until Monday) is not only NOT directly over the tea house (thank god), but also on the 3rd and top story, AND in the corner of the building. So that minimizes the extent of sound isolating that will be necessary in general. It's directly above a dentist office that's only open a few days a week, and even then, while we're all at work anyway.

As far as isolating the drums, I think I'll put them in a corner where the other side of the wall will be outside (since it's a corner office). I'm planning to build a riser out of high density wood panels, supported by hockey pucks stacked 2 high. I will glue acoustic foam to the underside of the platform but not allow it to touch the floor. I will build the platform large enough to accommodate the bass guitar amp, so that's up from the floor too.

Well, these are my plans... you know what they say about the best laid plans. We'll see if anything ends up working out!
 
Last edited:

blueshadow

Just Shuffling along
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
13,133
Reaction score
991
Location
North of Austin, Texas
Everything you ever wanted to know about acoustics and what to do about them is here:

Be prepared to go deep down inside the rabbit hole :) I wanted a drum space at home until reading through some of the projects and realizing how expensive it was going to be. Sounds like you're set though with the space going to work out. Before you build your platform you might check out what some have done on the sayers forum, you might find something that works better.
 


Top