Spainish American War?

wingnutz

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I just seen this and was intrigued. This old bass drum with the drum head painted over black. Looks to of once said "Fifteenth Pennsylvania Infantry". Any experts here have any idea if this is a period correct drum before the turn of the century or maybe was just a drum commemorating that division. No badges or tension rods.
 

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kdgrissom

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I suspect that this is a parade drum (due to the enlarged lettering) used at veteran/reunion gatherings. Most of the civil war drummers and fifers (and later buglers) were quickly rolled into the medical corps.
 

wingnutz

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I suspect that this is a parade drum (due to the enlarged lettering) used at veteran/reunion gatherings. Most of the civil war drummers and fifers (and later buglers) were quickly rolled into the medical corps.
That was kinda what I was thinking. More of a parade drum rather than anything that was actually used wartime pre-1900. I'm far from being any expert but I was thinking this was maybe a early1900s drum? Too bad it was painted over.
 

wingnutz

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Any idea on a make? If i pick it up like to find period correct hardware if any can be had.
 

kdgrissom

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Noble and Cooley were making drums for the Civil War and afterwards. They would probably know the significant builders of that era. My guess is that a Pennsylvania regiment would want drums from their home state as a point of pride, since allegiance to the state was stronger than to the country in that era.
 

Elvis

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+1. Likely N&C, or a local PA wood worker. Some drums were made by small cabinet shops who's names are lost to history.
I'm thinking the triangular hole was a broken spot, possibly where he strap anchored.
I'd keep the hole and file the corners round. Just like a cymbal, it keeps cracks from forming.
Good spot to drop a mike into and now you don't have to worry about ported heads. =)

Elvis
 

wingnutz

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That hole gives it character, I think I'd leave it. I am wondering on the possibility if that black paint would come off without removing the lettering. It's up for auction soon, I'll take better pictures if I win it. That's a good read on the 15th Infantry.
 


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