Stave drum building

Jvmalan

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I am a first time builder. I want to build an 8 sided stave drum. Each side of each stave needs to be beveled at 22.5 degrees. What is the most accurate way to set this angle on a table saw? I have read about digital angle gauges that attach magnetically to the blade, but they are only accurate to .2 degrees. Is this close enough? Is there a better way? Any advice is appreciated.
Thanks, john in Cincinnati
 

latzanimal

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You can also get a router bit. Most angle gauges are pretty accurate.

On a side note, I would reconsider only using 8 staves. The stave will need to be fairly thick to have enough material to remove when turning. Also, that's a lot of wood relying on strength along the grain...
 

swarfrat

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I've not built one but a neat trick I saw is to use an even number of segments, glue up two halves, and then saw or sand the halves to make them perfectly flat, then glue the two halves together. This accounts for any accumulated error if you end up being 11.24 degrees instead of 11.25 degrees.
 

Jvmalan

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You can also get a router bit. Most angle gauges are pretty accurate.

On a side note, I would reconsider only using 8 staves. The stave will need to be fairly thick to have enough material to remove when turning. Also, that's a lot of wood relying on strength along the grain...
Thanks for your reply. I should have been clearer about what I’m making. Some people call it a cajon conga. 24 to 29” tall with tapered staves. Usually 6 sides and a 1/8” birch plywood top. See picture.
6A68C51E-DC75-4CE7-BAFC-599F05DEA006.jpeg
 

Jvmalan

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You can also get a router bit. Most angle gauges are pretty accurate.

On a side note, I would reconsider only using 8 staves. The stave will need to be fairly thick to have enough material to remove when turning. Also, that's a lot of wood relying on strength along the grain...
Use a router to cut the bevel? I can’t seem to find one that cuts 22.5 degrees. ?
Thanks
 

cworrick

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Use a router to cut the bevel? I can’t seem to find one that cuts 22.5 degrees. ?
Thanks

If you want to go to 16 sides 11.25 degrees
 

Barden

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Thanks for your reply. I should have been clearer about what I’m making. Some people call it a cajon conga. 24 to 29” tall with tapered staves. Usually 6 sides and a 1/8” birch plywood top. See picture. View attachment 537822
That's fun.
You'll be making a compound cut and need a tapering sled for the table saw, but you probably already know that. Most people I see attempt this use some test material (MDF?) on a slightly smaller scale to verify the miter angle.

I did it with four sides out of baltic birch plywood, but I made the joints locking miters.
 

Jvmalan

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That's fun.
You'll be making a compound cut and need a tapering sled for the table saw, but you probably already know that. Most people I see attempt this use some test material (MDF?) on a slightly smaller scale to verify the miter angle.

I did it with four sides out of baltic birch plywood, but I made the joints locking miters.
Yes, I have plans for a sled so I can cut the taper and bevel in one pass.
plan to test fit with scrap. Hopefully can test bevel angle without the taper, bevel both sides of a 1x4 then cut into 2-3” pieces. once I nail down the angle I will cut it into the front of the sled and use that to set angle from then on. Do you think the .2 degrees of a digital angle gauge is close enough? Haven’t purchased the gauge yet, any suggestions?
Thanks John
 

davezedlee

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I am a first time builder. I want to build an 8 sided stave drum. Each side of each stave needs to be beveled at 22.5 degrees. What is the most accurate way to set this angle on a table saw? I have read about digital angle gauges that attach magnetically to the blade, but they are only accurate to .2 degrees. Is this close enough? Is there a better way? Any advice is appreciated.
Thanks, john in Cincinnati
draw one on a piece of paper, using a corner as your 90 degrees

 

Barden

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Yes, I have plans for a sled so I can cut the taper and bevel in one pass.
plan to test fit with scrap. Hopefully can test bevel angle without the taper, bevel both sides of a 1x4 then cut into 2-3” pieces. once I nail down the angle I will cut it into the front of the sled and use that to set angle from then on. Do you think the .2 degrees of a digital angle gauge is close enough? Haven’t purchased the gauge yet, any suggestions?
Thanks John
Well, 8 sides = 8 joints = 16 cuts. You could be multiplying 0.2 degrees by 16 for a total error of 3.2 degrees, but that's worst case scenario. With the small test pieces you'll be able to dial it in closer than that. And as you walk the angle in, you can recut the same test pieces for a smaller and smaller octagon as you only care about the angle and not the total radius.

I have the wixey angle gauge and haven't noticed it to be that inaccurate, but if I was making a stave setup I would only use it to get in the ballpark before fine tuning the angle like above.
 

Jvmalan

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I was planning on several test cuts to zero in on the angle. Wixey was one I’ve been reading about but I imagine with any of them you can only get close. Test cuts is the only way to get it exact.
Thanks again j
 

healthie1

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I haven't made a stave shell yet, but watched a lot of videos. I've seen guys cut the angle on a skillsaw they've jiggered into a make-shift tablesaw - I imagine it's one of those projects that you do a few times before you get it.

I know I'll be using 2x4's for at least my 1st stave drum.
 


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